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Public Document 



No. 2 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 




PORT 
OF THE 
1THENT OF EDUCATION 
YEAR ENDING JUNE 30 t 1965 



ISSUED IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 2 OF CHAPTER 69 

OF THE GENERAL LAWS 



PART I 







VOLUME 129 



■£- I If ■ <m 



0- 



37 9 7 A7 3 



ANNUAL RETORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

PART I 

Y««r Ending June 30 % 1965 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 



V 



• • • «» •• . . . • . 



196H-1965 
TA3LE Of COVTEMTS 



Annual Report of Board of Education 

Roster of Department of Education 1-14 

Former Members, Sacratarias and Comraiaa loners of tha Board of 

Education, ......... ••••• IS* 

Commissioner's Report to tha Board of Education. 17-400 

Board of Collegiate Authority 47-U-9 

Division of Elementary and Secondary Education* 50-36 

Secondary Education • , • • • , 54-58 

1 dance 59-62 

Academically Talented, , • • • 

Phyaical Education, Health, and Safety, , 64-66 

Business and Office Education 67-68 

Elementary Education 69-71 

Conservation Education, , «• 72-73 

Science and Mathematics 74-60 

Modern foreign Language Education, , , , , . , " I- ' 

Music Education 

Compensatory Education 8S-86 

Division of Special Education, •• • 87-97 

Mentally Retarded Children 87-89 

Physically Handicapped Children 90 

Deaf Children 91-9? 

Blind Children 93-9*1 

Partially-Seeing Children 95 

Speech Handicapped, Hard of Hearing, end Aphasic Children 81 

Emotionally Disturbed Children 97 



f 



-2- 

Division of Teacher Certification and Placement 98-103 

Division of Civic Education 104-114 

Division of Immigration and Americanization 115-141 

Division of the Blind 142-171 

Division of Library Extension • • 172-179 

Teachers* Retirement Board ••••••••••••••••••••• 160-222 

School Building Assistance Commission 223 

Division of School Lunch Programs, 224-235 

Division of University Extension 236-265 

Division of Vocational Education... 266-296 

Division of Research and Statistics 297-304 

State Aid 305-306 

Superintendency Unions and Regional School Districts 307-318 

Educational Television, 319-322 

Statistics 

Financial Report of the Department of Education - Year 

Ending June 30, 1965 323-348 

Vocational Education 

Roster of State-aided Vocational Schools - (Table 1)..... 349-358 

Consolidated Financial Statement by Types of Schools - 

(Table 2 ) 339-368 

Consolidated Summary of Receipts & Expend itures-( Table 3) 369-373 

Tabulation of State Reimbursement for Vocational Education 

(Table 3a) 374-381 

Earnings of Vocational Agricultural Pupils - (Table 5)... 382 

Vital Statistics by Types of Schools - (Table 6) 383-394 

Federal, Smith-Hughes and George Barden Funds - (Table 7) 395 

Statistics of Teacher-Training - (Table 8) IM*t1 

Registration and Employment of Minors 14 to 16 Years of 

Age - (Table 9) 399-400 



f 



„ 1 



EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORY 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
200 Newbury Street, Boston 02X16 



BOARD Or EDUCATION 
Tarn Expiree 

1967 Dr. Loo C. Donahue, Chairman, 12 Benton Rood, Somerville 

1970 Dr. Jawea R. Killian, Jr. 9 Vice-Chairman, Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology, Cambridge 
1973 Mr. Stuart Hacmillan, Secretary, IS State Street, Boa ton 

1965 Dr. William E. Park, Simmons College , Boeton 

1966 Mr. Joseph Salerno, 73 Tremont Street , Boeton 

1968 Mr. Philip Driacoli , hMftefeif Univeraity, Waltham 

1969 Mr. Thomae D. 0* Connor, 239 Main Street, Cambridge 

1971 Dr. Abrara L. Sachar, Brandeia University, Valtham 

1972 Dr. Alexander Brin, 2S1 Cauaeway Street, Boeton 



Dr. Owen B. Kieraan, Cowmiasioner of Education and Executive Officer 



BOARD OF COLLEGIATE AUTHORITY 
Ex Officio, Dr. Owen B. Kiernan, Commissioner of Education, Chairman 
Ter« Expiree 

1965 Dr. William E. Park, Simmone College, Boaton 

1965 Hies Mildred C. Thelen, Welles ley High School, Welleeley 

1966 Very Reverend John T. Corr, C.S.C., StonehlU College, 

North Easton 

1966 Mr. Joseph Salerno, 73 Trenont Street, Boeton 

1967 Dr. Leo C. Donahue, 12 Benton Road, Somerville 

1967 Dr. Louie Menand, III, Bradford Junior College, Bradford 

1968 Mr. Philip Driscoli, Brandeia University, Waltham 

1968 Dr. Martin Lichterman. 5 Constitution Road, Lexington 

1969 Mr. Thomaa D. 0* Connor, 9H Otis Street, Hinghaa 

1970 Dr. James R. Killian, Jr., Maaeaehuaette Institute of 

Technology, Cambridge 

1971 Dr. Abrem L. Sachar, Brandeia University, Waltham 

1972 Dr. Alexander Brln, 251 Cauaeway Street, Boaton 

1973 Mr. Stuart Macmillan, IS State Street, Beaton 




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# 



STATE BOARP FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 
THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 
and 
Ex Officio, Dr. Owen B. Kiernan, Commissioner of education 



ADMIHI r r 'T ^TAFF 

Thomas J* Curt in f Deputy Commissioner of Education 

Philip 3« Cashiean, Assistant Commissioner of Education 

Edward A. Silpatrick, Business Agent 

Gerald Pt Lambert, Coordinator, Federally- Aided Educational Program 

Frank V« Callahan, Assistant Uuslness Agent 

William J« Wallace, Senior Attorney 

Helen A* Smith, Supervisor of Personnel 

John J. Callahan, Jr., Supervisor in Education 

Janes E* Burke, Agent, Board of Collegiate Authority 

!>• Anne TUomau, Education information officer 

ICatherlne F, Murphy, Secretary to the commissioner 

Mary E. McKay, Assistant Secretary, Board of Education, and Secretary, 

Board of Collegiate Authority 
Mary L« Sullivan, Administrative Assistant 



DIVISIONS AND OFFICES OF THE DEPARTMENT 

DIVISION OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Everett G« Thistle, Director 

Joseph E, Killory, Assistant Director 

Joseph E. Beatable, Senior Supervisor, Guidance, Counseling and Testing 

Warren E, Benson, Senior Supervisor, Guidance and Plscement 

Francis J. Farrenkopf, Senior Supervisor, Culdanee, Counseling and Test in e 

Ernest A« Frechette, Senior Supervisor, Modern Foreign Languages 

Lawrence A. Ovlan, Senior Supervisor, Secondary Education 

John V. Packard, Senior Supervisor, Science 

James R« Powers, Senior Supervisor, Modern Foreign Languages 

Jesse 0. Richardson, Senior Supervisor, Science and Mathematics 

Stewart 3, Sargent, Senior Supervisor, Science 

John T. Schomer, Senior Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Allie W, Scrupgs, Senior Supervisor, Compensatory Servicea 

Ralph H. Coleon, Supervieor, Health, Safety and Phyalcal Education 

Raymond L. Gehling, Supervisor, Conservation Education 

John A. Geovania, Supervieor, Secondary Education 

William Hewson, Supervisor, Guidance, Counseling and Testing 

William F. Kelly, Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Robert M # Lacey, Supervieor, Music 

Robert L. Manning, Supervisor, Business and Office Education 



Elementary and Secondary (Continual) 

Ernest J« Massone, Supervisor, Modern Foreign Languages 
Thomaa F, Williams, Supervisor, Mathematics 

Vincent J, Worden, Supervisor, Guidance* Counseling and Tasting 
Anthony J* Zarella, Supervisor, Guidance, Counseling and Teat ins 



■ i .1 ■. ■ ' 



DIVISION OF VOCATIOMAL EDUCATION 

Walter J* Narkham, Direct or 

John F« Shea, Assistant Director 

Garrett T* Barry, Senior Supervisor, Private Trade Schools 

James E« Burke, Agent, Board of Collegiate Authority 

James L« Burka, Senior Supervisor, Trade end Industrial Education for 

Beys end Men 
Thomas M # Burke, Senior Supervisor, Vocational Art Education in Industry 
Anthony V # Cipriano, Senior Supervisor, Manpower Development and Training 

Program 
John Connolly, Senior Supervisor, Manpower Development and Training Program 
Francis J. Lombard, Senior Supervisor, Vocational Administration 
William J. McConnell, Senior Supervisor, Trade and Industrial Education for 

Boys and Men 
John P. Morlne, Senior Supervisor, Occupational Information and Vocational 

Guidance 
Grace L. Mangle, Senior Supervisor, Practical Nurse Education 
Robert F« Nolan, Senior Supervisor, Surplus Property Distribution 
Jesse A« Taft, Senior Supervisor, Agricultural Schools and Departments 
Joseph Barbero, Jr., Supervisor, Manpower Devel opm e n t and Training Program 
William P. Boland, Jr#, Supervisor, Trade and Industrial Education for 

Boys and Men 
William J« Butler, Supervisor, Manpower Development and Training Program 
Matthew E* Cardosa, Supervisor, Vocational Administration 
Dorris M. Closs, Supervisor, Household Arts Schools for Girls and Women 
John W. Fitsgerald, Supervisor, Trade and Industrial Education for Boys 

and Men 
Gedemen J* Gribouskl, Supervisor, Agricultural Schools and Departments 
Alfred F* Hoy Is, Supervisor, Trade and Industrial Education for Boys and Men 
Theodore A* Janiak, Supervisor, Vocational Administration 
Helen J, MeClintock, Supervisor, Adult Homemaking and Craft Education 
Mary I. McKay, Supervisor, Distributive Education 
Agnes H. O'Neill, Supervisor, Household Arts Education 
Raphaela A* Plcueci, Supervisor, Practical Nurae Education 
Ruth M # Shea, Supervisor, Trade and Indue trial Education for Girla and Women 
Homer V. Judge, Part-time Assistant Supervisor, Agricultural Schools and 

Departments 

In Service Training for Veterans 

■ ■ « 1 1 1 i . ■ i 1 1. ■ ■ . ■ 

Jamas E # Burka, Agent, Board of Collegiate Authority, and Senior Supervisor, 
Veterans 1 Training 

■ Supervisor, Veterans* Training 



DIVISION OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION 

franklin ?. Hawkeo, Director 

Donald J* Geary, Senior Supervisor In Education 

Walter F. Keavey 9 Senior Supervisor in Education 

Themes S, Hutebcaon, Supervisor in Education 

Otto Kiessling, Supervisor in Education 

Robert L, NcGrew 9 Supervisor in Education 

Harold F # HcNulty, Supervisor in Education 

Leo r. A* Murphy f Supervisor in Education 

Nary K# Prendergast, Supervisor in Education 

Paul 0. Reilly, Supervisor in Education 

Carlo A* Simeoll, Supervisor in Education 

Edward T* Sullivan v Supervisor in Education 

Kcleey B. Sweatt, Supervisor in Education 9 and Coordinator, Audio-Visual 

Services 
Carroll F# Towey, Supervisor in Education 
Robert 3« Wentworth, Supervisor in Education 
William U. Goudey 9 Jr. 9 Assistant Supervisor in Education 
Harold V # McAuliffe 9 Assistant Supervisor in Education 
Melville l\» Rood, Jr., Assistant Supervisor in Education 
Spencer D. Eddy 9 Organ lain* Extension Instructor 
Rionard J* Barrett 9 Organising Extension Instructor 
Gabriel R» Passero 9 Organising Extension Instructor 
Patricia Hollander, Organising Extension Instructor 
Earl E. Adrcani, Univerelty Extension Instructor 
L« Champion Cellar, University Extension Instructor 
Christina S« Hatch 9 University Extension Instructor 
Joyce A. Tully 9 University Extension Instructor 



DIVISION OF SPECIAL EDUCATION 

William A» Philbrick, Jr., Director 

Nicholas It Wells 9 Senior Supervisor, Mentally Retarded Children 
Thomas H. Browne, Supervisor, Emotionally Disturbed Children 
Helen I, Collins 9 Supervisor 9 Physically Handicapped Children 
Anthony V. DeLeo 9 Supervisor, Mentally Retarded Children, Bridgewater 

State College 
Catherine G, FitsGerald 9 Supervisor, Mentally Retarded Children 9 Springfield 
William F. Frary 9 Supervisor, Guidance, Placement 9 and Follow-up of Retarded 

Children 
Harjorie J. Frye, Supervisor, Blind and Partially Seeing Children 
John H. Gray, Supervisor, dentally Retarded Children, Worcester State 

College 
Marianne C. HcKeon, Supervisor 9 Deaf Children 
William I, 0* Brian 9 Supervisor , Mentally Retarded Children 
Herbert Drew, Supervisor, Mest&lly ^•tareed Children, Worcester State 

College 
Wilms A, Hull, Assistant Supervisor, Blind and Partially Seeing Children 



DIVISION OF CIVIC EDUCATION 
Margaret M # Gear an. Director 



Lawrence M. Bonglovanni, Senior Supervisor 
Franc U R« Mac Dona Id, Supervisor 



DIVISION OF TEACHER CERTIFICATION AND PLACEMENT 
John P. McGreil, Director 
David L. Fitspatrick, Supervisor in Education 



DIVISION OF RESEARCH AND STATISTICS 

Raymond S. Dover, Jr. , Director 

John Toroaian, Senior Supervisor in Education 
Frank H. Livak 9 Senior Supervisor in Education 
William J. Crowley, Supervisor in Education 
Glenn A* Myers, Supervisor in Education 
Thomas P. Lenane, Assistant Supervisor in Education 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

Board of Library Commissioners 

Term Expires 

1968 Richard J. Sullivan, Chairman, Reading 

1989 Mrs. Lydia Goodhue, Secretary, Welles ley 

1968 George D. Blackwood, Arlington 

1968 Mrs. Amy Bess Killer, Pitts field 

1970 James F. Francis, New Bedford 

V. Genevieve Galick, Director 

Alice M. Cahill, Assistant Director 

M. Elisabeth Flynn, Senior Supervisor of Public Library Development 
Charles V. Adams, Supervisor of School Libraries 
Betty H. Flagg, Supervisor of Field Services 
Catherine R. McCarthy, Supervisor of Field Services 
Barbara A. Murphy, Library Reference Assistant 



Library Extension (Continued) 

Julia N# Hlgglns, Regional Bookmobile Librarian, fall River 
Grace M. Baker, Regional Bookmobile Librarian, Greenfield 
Marjorie E. Haselton, Per.ional Bookmobile Librarian, North Reading 
Barbara L. Moray, Regional Bcokaobile Librarian, Pittsfield 
Cornelia B, Church, Regional Librarian, Greenfield 
Rachel M. Sullivan, Regional Librarian, North Reading 
Marianne H. Rowe, Children's Library Specialist, Greenfield 



OFFICE OF SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAMS 

600 Washington Street, Boston 02111 
512*8890 

John C. Stalker, Director 
Thomas B. Donoghue, Assistant Director 

, Supervisor in Education 
Frances t$ Cullen, As a 1st ant Supervisor 
James J. McGrath, Supervisor in Account inr 
Michael J. Rolli, Supervisor of Distribution 
Joseph J, Bunevith, Field Agent in Accounting 
Joseph A« Cella, field Agent in Accounting 
Robert R« Cleary, Field Agent in Accounting 
Bruno Maule, Field Agent in Accounting 
Angele A« Sbardella, Field Agent in Accounting 
Marjorie E. Cow lea. Field Representative in Nutrition 
Louise Frederick, Field Representative in Nutrition 
Ruth H. Taber, Field Representative in Nutrition 
J. Bernice Bourell, Field Representative in Nutrition 



DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

73 Tremont Street, Room 20!) , Boston 02108 

227-071B 



Members of the Board 
Term Expires 

1988 Gemma Valenti, Chairman, Medford 

1965 Bernard Harmon, Brookline 

1965 Carol Offenbach, Melrose 

1966 Robert E. Patenaude, North Adams 

1967 Mary E« Tvomey, Belmont 
1967 Eleanor Davoren, Milford 



Teofilia K. Tattan, Supervisor of Social Service 



r 



7 

Social Workers 

Carolyn D. Jeckym Marl or ie 8. Reynolds 

Dryna Lanaky Of A. Scutell 

District Immigration Agents 

Andrew W. Ansara, Uvranct John A, Mclnnee, Springfield 

Daniel J. Donahue, Fall Fiver n*emnd B. Meduski, Worcester 



DIVISION OP THE BLIND 

1M Court Square, Boston 02106 
523*0200 



Advisory Board 
Tarn Expires 

1967 Gregory Khacbadoorian, Chairman, Arlington 

1969 George Alevixos, Boston 

1966 Edward J. Waterhouse, Watertown 

1969 Daea Moore, Braintraa 

1969 Hsthan L. Shapiro, Randolph 

John F. Mungovan, Diractor 

George Curt in # Supervisor of Individual Services 
Fradarick Greehan, Supervisor of Rehabilitation 
Michael Sullivan, Suparvisor of Research and Statistics 
Thomas O'Donnell, Supervieor of In-Service Training 
Ethel Fredrick, Supervisor of Aid to the Blind 
Hary McLaughlin, Supervisor of Children's Services 
Fay Callero, Supervisor of Home Teaehers 



SCHOOL BUILDING ASSISTANCE COMMISSION 

86 Broad Street, Room 618, Boston 02110 

H26-8863 

Ex Officio, Owen B. Kiernan, Commissioner of Education 

Term Expires 

1971 Arthur F, Eldridge, Chairman, Shelbume Falls 

1971 Gabriel L. DiBsttista, Hil'ord 

1971 John E. Deady 9 Dorchester 

1971 Harold Holmquist, Boylston 

1971 Albert &• Humphrey, Great Harrington 

1971 T. David Woodbury, Milton 

Simeon J* Domes, Administrator 



I 



.... 8 

TEACHERS' RETIREMENT BOARD 

09 Broad Street, Boston 02110 
U20-5U97 

Members of the Board 

Ex Officio f Owen B. Kiernan, Chai 



Tern Expiree 

IfM Rsynon W. Eldridge, Brookline 

1967 Helen H. Theinert, Springfield 



Joseph B. Carroll, executive Secretary 



' I VISIOH OF YOUTH SERVICE 

XH Somerset Street, Boston 02108 
727-2733 

Youth Service Board 

Tern Expires 

1970 John D # Coughlan, Director of Division and Chairman of the 

Youth Service Board, Melrose 
Laura C, Stroradahl, Assistant to the Director 
196S Cecelia McGovem Field, Chestnut Hill 

1971 Joseph W. Zabriakie 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON SERVICE TO YOUTH 



• 



Elsa Siipola, Vice-chairman, Northampton 
Edgar Gross nan, tfewton 
John R. Mullen, Wollaston 
Reverend Villiaw H, Roche, Boston 



1970 
IMfl 

IfM 

iJoft 

19*6 

IfM Fred S. Fahey, Oalton 

Itfl Janes R* Goonan, Kingston 

196B ank ^alters, -fatertown 

19G8 

1970 Francis R. Carroll, Worcester 

1970 ,ine A. Drey, Deerfield 

1970 Gillian V« Francis, Boston 

Itfl John D. O'Connor* Jestf ield 

1970 Janes H. Quirk, Yarmou 

1970 Alberts Roosa Turner, Boston 



<J 






Youth Service (Continued) 
School 

Industrial School for Cirla 

Industrial School for Boys 

Lyman School for Boys 

Reception- Detention Can tar for Cirls 



Inst i tuts for Juvanilo Guidance 
Judga John J. Connolly Youth Center 

Residential Treatment Unit 
West field Detention Center 
Worcester Detention Center 
Stephen L. French Youth Forestry Camp 



Superintendent 

Elisabeth Van Waters, Lancaster 

John Haatinpa, Shirley 

Francis Ordway, Westborousji 

Beatrice R« Inpenere 

105 South Muntinrton Avenue 

Boaton 

John Ball, South Br id re water 

Francis H. Maloney v Jr* 

*»50 Canterbury Street, Boaton 

Patrick F. Creoden, Oakdale 

Edward Coyne 

Paul T. Leahy 

Uiam HaeDonald v East Brewster 



Term Expires 

1969 
1966 
1966 
1966 
1967 

1967 
1967 
1968 

1968 

1968 
1969 
1969 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE FOR EDUCATIONAL TELE . 



William M. Powers, Chairman, Superintendent of Schools, Meedham 

John 3. Chaffee, Superintendent of Schools, Welles ley 

Robert D, Russell, Superintendent of Schools, Longmeadow 

**• Qordan Swan, Chairman of the School Committee, Hilton 

Thomas J, Curtin, Deputy Connies ioner of Education, Commonwealth 

of Massachusetts 
Hart Fassenden, Headmaster, Fessendan School, Newton 
Horace W. Hewlett, Secretary, Amherst Collepe, Amherat 
William J. Cunningham, Assistant Superintendent of Schools, 

Beaton 
Rt. Rev. Konsignor Albert W. Low, Superintendent of Schools, 

Archdiocese of Boston 
William F. Young f Superintendent of Schools, Braintree 
Horman Harris, Education Director, Museum of Science , Boston 
Robert J, McCartney, University of Massachusetts 



Louise G, McHamara, Acting Director of the 21 Inch Classroom 

Phyllis K. Hyde, Assistant to the Acting Director 

30 Franklin Street, Boaton 02110 
5U2-2U1U 



♦ 



BOARD OF EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE 1() 

Ex Officio, Owen B. Klernan, Commissioner of Education 

Ex Officio, John W. Lederle, President of the University of Massachusetts t 

Amherst 
Ex Officio, Helre iiol.it , President, Massachusetts Higher Education 

Assistance Corporation, Boston 
Ex Officio, Daniel . *Leary, Chairman, Lowell 



Tern Expires 

1966 Salvatore Camelio, Beaton 

1966 . Henry Goguen, Leominster 

1966 Harry Olins, Boston 

1967 Andrew J. Torrielli, Fielmont 
1961 Harold C« Case, Boston 

1968 Reverend Vincent McQuade, Andover 

1969 Charles S. Johnson, Bedford 



Conrad L. Kohler, Executive Secret ar; 



MEDICAL, DENTAL, AND NURSIVG SCHOLARSHIP BOARD 



Tern Expires 



1966 Raymond P. Harold, Chairman, Worcester 

1966 <3eorge A. Michael, D.3C. , Secretary, Boston 

1965 Sante faldarola, M.D # , Springfield 

1965 Joseph Martins, Fall River 

1965 Ivor P. Hussy, D.M.D., Orange 

1966 <oae P, DeSuze, Concord 

1966 leaner A. Gaffney, Jamaica Plain 

1967 Hyaan Duby, M.D., Plymouth 



DIVISION OF STATE COLLEGES 
John Cillespie, Director 
Francis X« Cuindon, Assistant Director 
State College President 



William F. Looney 566-«»5U5 

Bridge water Adrian Roodileau 697-6161 

Fltchburg James J. Hammond 3-GU17 

Framlngham D. Justin McCarthy 872-3501 

Lowall Daniel H, O'Ler U5B-6951 

forth Adams Eurene L. Freel 663-6582 

Salem <>rick *. **It 7U5-0 

Westfield Leonard J, Savl^nano 562-9906 

Worcester Eugene A. .'uUivin 756-5121 

Massachusetts College of ^bert L. Bertolli 73U-?'U:> 

Massachusetts Maritime Academy A. ^anford Limouse 7< 9-5731 

50 Franklin Street, Boston 0211 
542-2970 



1! 



SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS TECHNOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, NORTH DARTMOUTH 

997-9321 



TRUSTEES 



Terns Cxplr«» 

1960 Joseph K. Souse, Chairman, Hew Bedford 



1965 Albert C, Hartal, Vice-Chairmen, New Bedford 

1965 William F, Carney, Secretary, : >ertmouth 

1966 Robert J. Naple, Treasurer, Tall "iver 
1965 George E. Carij?nan, New Bedford 

1965 Joseph Dswson , Jr. # South Dartmouth 

1965 Paul 0. LsBelle, Jr., North Dartmouth 

1966 Arthur F.. Flts^erald, Lexington 
1966 William F. Lonf, Jr., Fall Plver 

1966 Lydia 3. Nunes, Hew Bedford 

1967 Philip J. Aesiran, Taunton 
1967 Robert W. Nelson, Attleboro 
1967 James Pilkington, West port 
1967 Ralph A. Roberts, Fall River 
1967 Sherwood J. Tarlow, Newton 

Joseph L. Driecoll, President 



LOWELL TECHNOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF MASSACHUSETTS 

45H-7811 

TRUS. 

Ex Officio, Her Honor, Ellen A. Sampson, Mayor 

Ex Officio, Owen B. Kieroan, Commissioner of Education 

Term Expires 

1966 

1967 John J. Delmore, V ice-Chairman, Lowell 



Utl 

1965 
1965 
1965 
1965 
1966 
1966 
1966 



1967 
1967 
|M1 



Saeruel Pinanski, Chairman, Brook line 

John J. Delmore, Viee-Chairman, Lowel 

Thomas T. Clark, Andover 

Harold W. Leitch, Andover 

Francis P. Madden, Winthrop 

Timothy F, Meehon, Lowell 

Irene K. Mitchell, Dracut 

Alvan IU Benjamin, Boston 

Israel Cohen, Newton 

Jemes T. Curtis, Lowell 

rjuund A. Wesolowski, Sh: 
Joseph A* DeMambro, Chest) 



— —-"—— -" — ■ - — » — — 

Slgmund A. Wesolowski, Shirley 
Joseph A. DeMambro, Chestnut Hill 
Joseph P. Donahue, Jr., Lowell 
Lawrence R. Laugh lin, Chelmsford 
Anne D. Minahan, Lawrence 



Martin J. Lydon, President 



1^ 



IVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, 
5H5-0111 

TRUSTEES 



Ex Officio, 


Ex Officio, 


Ex Officio, 


Ex Officio, 


Ex Officio, 


Ex Officio, 


Term Expires 


1966 


1966 


1967 


1967 


1968 


1968 


1969 


1969 


1969 


1969 


1969 


1970 


1970 


1971 


1971 


1972 


1972 



His Excellency, John A. Volpe, Governor 

Owan 3, Kiernan, Commissioner of Education 

Charles H. McNamara, Commissioner of Agriculture 

Alfred U Frechette, M.D. , Coram iesioner of Public Health 

Harry C« Solomon, M.D. , Commiss loner of Mantel Health 

John W. Laderle, President of the University 



Dennis M. Crowley, Boston 

Martin Swelg, Winthrop 

Frank L« Boyden, Deerfiel 

George L, Pumphret, Dorchester 

Harry Dunlap Brown, Morth Chatham 

John H, Hai#is, Jr., Greenfield 

Most Reverend Christopher J» Weldon, Springfield 

Fred C, Emerson, A?awam 

Edmund J. Croce, Worcester 

Hugh Thompson, Milton 

Calvin H. Plimpton, Amherst 

Joseph P. Healey, Arlington 

Frederick S. Troy, Boston 

Robert D. Gordon, Lincoln 

Louis M. Lyons, Cambrldre 

Caroline Rowland, Boston 

John J» Maginnis, Worcester 

OFFICERS OF THE TRUSTEES 



Kis Excellency, John A, Volpe, President 
Frank L. Boyden, Chairman, Deerfield 
Robert J* McCartney, Secretary, Amherst 
Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer, Amherst 



John W. Lederle, President 



BOARD OF REGIOHAL COMMUNITY COLLEr 

Ex Officio, Owen B. Kiernan, Commissioner of Education 

Ex Officio, Joseph L. Driscoll, President, Southeastern Massachusetts 

Technological Institute 
Cx Officio, D # Justin Mc Carthy, President, State Callage at Framings* 
Ex Officio, John W. Ledarle, President, 'Jniversity of Massachusetts 



13 



Community Colleges (Continued) 

Term Expires 

1970 Kemit C» Morrissey, Chairman, Norwood 

1965 Daniel England, Jr., Pittsfield 

Ittfl George D« Blackwood, Arlington 

1J6G Pave rand Raymond Swords, l»J* a forces tar 

1967 Margaret P. Bair.br id?e, Wat art own 

1960 William J« Dean, Holyoke 

1968 

1969 Thaodora Chase, Dover 
1969 

1970 Henry Foley, Jamaica Plain 
1970 Roger L. Putnam, Sr. , Petersham 

William G # Dwyer, President 
John V, Costello, Executive Director 
727-2976 

REOION'AL COMMUNITY COLI 



Berkshire Community College, Plttsfield 
Thomas T, ^'Connell, President 
W3-4446 

Cape Cod Community College, Hyannia 
E. Carleton >lickerson. President 
775-1582 

Greenfield Community College, Greenfield 

Lewis # Turner, President 

774-U37* 

Holyoke Community Collepe, Hoi yoke 

fleovz* E. Frost, President 

536-162U 

Massachusetts Bay Community College, Boston 
John F. MeKenzie, President 
262-1300 

Mount Wachusett Community College, Gardner 

Arthur F # Haley, President 

632-1280 

Northern Essex Community College, Haverhill 
Harold Bentley, President 
372-8501 

North Shore Community College, Beverlv 

Harold . lively, Preaident 

927-2121 

:insifaaond Community College, Worcester 
Paul G. Preus, President 
756-5703 



L4 



ADVISORY BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY 

Cx Officio f John tf« Lederle, President, University of Massachusetts 

Ex Officio, Martin J. Lydon, President, Lowell Technological Institute 

I x Officio, Joseph M # Souza, Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Southeastern 

Massachusetts Technological Institute 
Zx Officio, John Gillespie, Director of the Division of State Collates 
Ex Officio, Kerwit C. Korrissey, Chairman of the Board of Regional Community 

Collepes 
Cx Officio, Owen 3* Kiernan, Commissioner of Education, Chairman 

Appointees of His Excellency the Governor t 

Tern Expires 

1965 Samuel L. Lowe, Jr., Newton 

1966 Frank W. Crimp t lilton 

1967 Mrs. 3ruce 3. Benson, Amherst 
19*8 Eliot K # Cohen, ilewton 

1969 William H. Bixby, Waban 

Richard V # McCann, Executive Director 
267-9S50 



% 



rORHER MEMBERS WARD Of TTOUCATTON OR T 

ADVISORY BOARD 



15 



Jama* ::. Carter 
Emerson Davis 
Edmund Dwi 



ORIGINAL MEMBERS— 1837 

ward A* Mewton 
Robert Rantoul, Jr. 



Robbins 
Tared Sparks 



APPOINTED SIMM 



George Putnam 
Charles Hudson 
George M* 3r iggs 
William C. Bates 
John it James 
niisha Bartlett 
Heraan Humphry 
Stephen C. Phillips 
Barnes Sears 
Edwin H. Chepin 
lenry 3. Hooker 
Stephen P. Webb 
Thomas Kinnicutt 
Joseph W. Injrraham 
John A« Bolles 
George B. Emerson 
Charles K. True 
Hark Hopkins 
Edward Ot heraan 
Isaac Davis 
Alexander H. Vinton 
George S. Boutwell 
Henry Wheatland 
Hosea Ballou 
Ariel Parish 
Cornelius C. Felton 
Alonso H. Quint 
William A. Stearns 
Huasell Tonlinson 
Erestus 0. Haven 
David H. Mason 
John P. Marshall 
Enory Washburn 
Abner J. Phipps 
Jajses Freeman Clarke 
Williaoi Rice 
John D. Philbrick 
Jeremiah E. Burke 



Samuel T. See lye 
George T. Wilde 
Gardiner G. : bard 
Alonso A. Miner 
Harry Chapin 
Constantine C. Esty 
Edward B. Cillett 
Phillips Brooks 

-Istopher C. Huasey 
Charles B. rdce 
Elijah B. Stoddard 
Horatio '\ .<ni~ht 
Abby W. May 
Charles Francis Adams 9 Jr. 

Iton B. Whitney 
Thomas W. Higginson 
Admiral P. "tone 

aciB A. Walker 
Edward C. Carripan 
Horace E # Scudder 
Elmer H, Capen 
Kate Gannett Wells 
Alice Freeman Palmer 
Oeorre I, Aldrirh 

or^e H. Con ley 
Joel . Her 
Franklin Carter 
Clinton 0, FJchwond 
Caroline Hasard 
Albert E. Winship 
Thomas B. Fitzpatrick 
Frederick P« Fish 

r»ah Louise Arno] 
Simeon B. Chase 
Levi L. Con ant 
Frederick W. Hamilton 
Paul H. Hanua 



James Chalmers 

Margaret 3 lattery 

Samuel L # Powers 

Michael J. Downey 

George H. Wrenn 

Arthur H. Lowe 

Ella Lyman Cabot 

Grace S, Mansfield 

Henry 3. Sawyer 

Walter V. - uffee 

Lincoln Filene 

Mary E. Murray 

P« A. O'Comnell 

Roger L. Putnam 

Thomas H, Tullivan 

Kathryn A # Doyle 

Mrs, Anna M. Power 

Ada L. Cowst<^ 

Dr. Francis T. Spaulding 

Mrs, Flora Lane 

Bancroft Beatley 

John J. Walsh 

. ^edican 

Hon, Michael H. Sullivan 

David D. t . . 
. Walter F. Downey 
. Frank L. Boyden 

Grac« A, Buxton 
. John Gregory 

Dr. Owen B. Klernan 

Mrs. Julia M. Fuller 

Allan ?. Finlay 

Hon. Frank W, Tomaaello 

°t. Rev. Msjrr. Cornelius 
T. H. Sherlock 

Mrs. Alice M. Lyons 

Mrs. Robert A. Pederson 

Dr. John W. McDevltt 






( 



EX-0FTICII8 - 



16 



Edward Everett 
Marcus Morton 
John Davis 
Ceorp.a N. Brings 
George S. Boutwell 
John H. Clifford 
Emory Washburn 
Henry J* Gardner 
Hathaniel P. Banks 
John A* Andrew 
Alexander H. Bullock 



William Claflin 
William 3. Washburn 
Wllliaa Gaston 
Alexander H. Rice 
Thomas Talbot 
John D« Long 
Benjamin F. Butler 
George D. Robinson 
Oliver Ames 
John Q* A. Braokett 
William E. Russell 



Trederlc T. Greenhalge 
Roger Wolcott 
W. Murray Crane 
John L. Bates 
William L. Dourlas 
Curt i3 Guild, Jr. 
Eben S. Draper 
ene N. Foss 
David I. Walsh 
Samuel w # McCall 
Calvin Coolidge 



EX-OFFICIIS - LIL'UTENAHT-* ■ 



George Hull 
Henry H. Childs 
John Reed 
Henry w. Cushman 
Elisha Huntington 
Wllliaa C. Plunkett 
Simon Brown 
Henry W. Benchley 



Lohalet Trask 
John Z, Goodrich 
John Nesmith 
Joel Hayden 
Willi am Claflin 
Joseph Tucket 
Thomas Talbot 
ftoratio G # Knight 



Byron Weston 
Oliver Ames 
William Haile 
Louis A. Froth inghasi 
Robert Luce 
Edward P, Barry 
Grafton D, Cushlng 
Channinr l« Cox 



SECRETARIES OF THE BOARD 



1837-1648 

1849-1855 
1856-1160 
1861-1876 



Horace Mann 
Barnas Sears 
George 3. Bout we 11 
Joseph White 



1877-1893 John W. DicV;.rson 

1894-1902 Fran' I. : 11 

1903-1904 C. B. Tillin*hast 

1904-1315 George H. Martin 



1909-1915 
1916-1935 
1935-1938 



COMMISSIONERS OF EDUCATION 



David 
Payson Smith 

James G. Reardon 



1939-1943 
1943-1946 
1946-1957 
1957- 



Walter F« Downey 
Julius E. Warren 
John J* Desmond, Jr. 
Dr, Owen B. Kiernan 



1 7 



t 



I 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of 

THE COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION 



JUNE ■ 1965 



IcS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Introduction 1 

State Progress 1 

Federal Gains 3 



Improving Instruction 7 

Computer Project 8 

The Academically Talented 9 

The disadvantaged 11 

Education and Race Relations 13 

Center for Research and Development 14 



An Ever Widening Focus 15 

Authority of the Commissioner 17 

Basic Education for Adults 18 

Regional Centers 19 

The Question of Automation 22 



Legislation 23 

Acts 25 

Resolves 26 



Conclusion 27 



, 



1<) 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Education 



ANNUAL REPORT 
of the 
COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION 
June 30, 1965 



The application of any measuring device, precise 
or otherwise, would record 1965 as a milestone year. 
Truly significant history was made in the field of educa- 
tion both on the state and national levels. Unprecedented 
progress was realized in spite of turbulent conditions 
which were observed in every month of the year. The fact 
that major problems remain with us involving burgeoning 
enrollments, taxes, civil rights, and many others is a 
guarantee that the years following 1965 will be no less 
challenging. 

STATE PROGRESS 

On June 28, just two days before the close of the 
Commonwealth's fiscal year, the Governor signed into law 
Chapter 572. This far-reaching legislation will take its 
place among those consequential acts in our educational 
history beginning with the famous colonial laws of 1642 
and 1647. Its official title is "An Act to Improve and 
Extend Educational Facilities in the Commonwealth," but 

Publication No. 270 approved by Alfred C. Holland, State Purchasing Agent. 



£<> 



in its broadest dimension it touches on every aspect of 
school and collegiate operations. Chapter 572 is the direct 
result of a $250,000 state-wide survey conducted by the 
Massachusetts Education Study Commission. The original 
request for such a study was initiated by the Department in 
1960, and reasons therefor will be found in the Commissioner's 
Annual Report under date of June 30, 1961. The overriding 
needs might be listed briefly as coordination in the field 
of public higher education, the vesting of broader powers 
in the Board of Education to establish and enforce standards 
through an effectively strengthened Department of Education, 
and the recognition by the Commonwealth of its obligation 
to assist in underwriting education locally — hopefully in 
the amount of not less than 40C on each education dollar. 

The new statute establishes three Boards, viz., 
a Board of Education, a Board of Higher Education, and an 
Advisory Council on Education. Their primary responsibility 
is to maintain quality programs of education for the chil- 
dren, youth and adults of Massachusetts. In seeking this 
most worthy goal the new Board members may be assured of 
the complete and continuing cooperation of the Commonwealth's 
Department of Education. However, as impressive as this 
new machinery may be, it will not function without appro- 
priate fuel. In this case, the fuel must be a massive 
infusion of dollars. Unless adequate financial support is 



1 

'41 



immediately forthcoming, our efforts over the past five 
years become academic with little meaning or purpose. 

FEDERAL GAINS 

Last year's Annual Report dealt at some length 
with the role of the Federal Government in the educational 
enterprise. Specific reference was made to federal aid 
programs which earned for the 88th Congress the unofficial 
title of "The Education Congress." The two most important 
enactments included substantially increased assistance for 
vocational and higher education. For those who complained 
that the largest segment of American education was over- 
looked, i.e., elementary and secondary schools, the action 
of the 89th Congress must represent a most welcome change. 
For the first time in history a sizeable allotment of 
federal monies (more than $1,300,000,000) has been earmarked 
for strengthening and improving educational quality and 
educational opportunities in the nation's elementary and 
secondary schools. Enacted as Public Law 89-10, five 
separate titles are designed to: (1) strengthen elementary 
and secondary school programs for educationally deprived 
children in low income areas, (2) provide additional school 
library resources, textbooks, and other instructional 
materials, (3) finance supplementary educational centers 



«. 



2iJ 



and services, (4) broaden areas of cooperative research, 
and (5) strengthen State Departments of Education. 

Subject to appropriation, Massachusetts initially 
should receive approximately $20,000,000 broken down as 
follows: Title I -- $13,998,754; Title II -- $2,622,125; 
Title III -- $2,581,226; Title V -- $477,050. Title IV 
funds are not earmarked for states but will be reserved 
for the establishment of research and development labora- 
tories on a national basis. However, in conjunction with 
several distinguished partners including our renowned 
institutions of higher learning, the Department already 
has filed a petition for the establishment of such a 

regional laboratory here in Massachusetts. 

- 
Although the several titles are important, par- 
ticularly Title I with its provisions for disadvantaged 
children and youth, Titles II and V represent unique 
breakthroughs in previously neglected areas. The former 
deals with positive recognition of the increasingly 
critical need for adequate library resources and services. 
For reasons beyond the comprehension of most thinking 
citizens, libraries — which represent the very heart of an 
institution of learning--are regarded as luxuries. 
Nationally on the elementary school level, 47% of the public 
and over 50% of the non-public schools have no library. 
Others listed in the "have library" category offer facilities 



<:;{ 



and services which can only be described as pitifully inade- 
quate. Secondary schools are not appreciably better off than 
those in the elementary category. Quality in school library 
programs has the highest of correlations with students' 
academic achievements, and Title II offers hope for an 
effective local-state-federal partnership in underwriting 
decent libraries. 

Title V represents the other significant breakthrough 
by providing desperately needed funds for strengthening 
State Departments of Education. Although there has been 
universal acceptance of the fact that education is a State 
function, few states have properly financed these important 
agencies. Alternatives to strong State Departments are local 
leadership arrangements with only a few communities providing 
consistent quality, or an unacceptable and indefensible 
federal system of education. Today, the professional staff 
of this Department is spread so thin that service to school 
systems can only be rendered indirectly via bulletins and 
publications, through area workshops, seminars and conven- 
tions, with only occasional time reserved for individual 
teachers, and administrators at the local scene. 

The Commonwealth's first and most illustrious 
Commissioner, Horace Mann, noted the time and responsibility 
disparities in his own case as early as 1840. In pleading 
for support of the Department's earliest counterpart and the 






( 



< 



SJ4 



new Board of Education he wrote as follows: 

Unless, therefore , the friends of Education, 
in different parts of the State, shall proffer 
their cordial and strenuous cooperation, it is 
obvious, that the great purposes , for which the 
Board was constituted, can never be accomplished. 
Some persons, indeed, have suggested, that the 
Secretary of the Board should visit the schools, 
individually , and impart such counsel and 
encouragement as he might be able;--not reflecting 
that such is their number and the shortness of the 
time during which they are kept, that, if he were 
to allow himself but one day for each school, to 
make specific examinations and to give detailed 
instructions , it would occupy something more than 
sixteen years to complete the circuit; --while the 
period, between the ages of four and sixteen, 
during which our children usually attend school, 
is but twelve years; so that, before the Secretary 
could come around upon his track again, one entire 
generation of scholars would have passed away, and 
one third of another. At his quickest speed, he 
would lose sight of one quarter of all the children 
in the State. 



The phenomenal growth of Massachusetts since those 
early days obviously has compounded the problem of pro- 
fessional visitation and assistance. With each passing 
year additional thousands of students and teachers add to 
the weight of the task and the remoteness of its accomplish- 
ment. For this reason the implementation of Title V of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 196 5 offers a 
bright ray of hope. With new monies, far more effective 
service procedures can be established at Department 
Headquarters in Boston as well as regionally. More will 
be said later in this Report on regional centers. 



<55 



IMPROVING INSTRUCTION 

The strengthening of administrative and super- 
visory services on both the State and local levels share 
a single goal, that of improving instruction. Among the 
numerous statutory and professional responsibilities of 
the Department is one to seek out and disseminate the 
better practices. A specific charge to the Commissioner 
can be found in Chapter 69, section 1 of the General Laws: 

He shall collect and distribute information 
as to the condition and efficiency of the public 
schools and other means of popular education and 
the best methods of instruction; shall suggest 
improvements in the present system of public 
schools . . . 

In responding to the above charge, Department 

officers must be sensitive to innovation, particularly the 

determination as to which of the newer practices are mere 

fads and which are truly defensible. Unfortunately, funds 

have never been adequate for this purpose. Massachusetts 

and the forty-nine sister states spend only a fraction of 

1% on research and development. By way of comparsion, 

many business and industrial firms commit over 10% of their 

annual budgets to research and development activities. In 

spite of fiscal limitations the Department participates 

continuously in seeking out better ways of doing things, 

with greatest emphasis on curriculum design. Sometimes 

this is done alone, at other times in partnership with local 



J2tf 



8 

school systems, institutions of higher learning, and 
allied educational agencies. The constraints of time and 
space prevent a complete listing of all activities of this 
type, but the following list may provide the reader with 
an idea of the scope and depth of the effort. 

Compute,*. Pn.oje.ct 

This project, the first formal program of its kind 
in the nation, is aimed at determining how computer- 
aided instruction can be used to improve the teaching of 
mathematics and problem solving at elementary, junior 
and senior high school levels. The system will consist 
of a network of teletypewriter terminals connected to 
a multiple access digital computer in the Cambridge 
facilities of Bolt Beranek and Newman, Inc., one of the 
country's leading research and scientific organizations. 
By means of easily learned programmed languages called 
Telecomp and Toll 1, students in the sixth grade at 
Belmont's Kendall School, in the ninth grade at 
Lexington High School, Brookline High School, and 
Phillips Academy in Andover, and in the eleventh grade 
at Westwood High School, can call upon the computer to 
solve proglems in math, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, 
or even higher disciplines. 

Sponsored by the U. S. Office of Education under 






I 



Z7 



the Curriculum Improvement Program of the Cooperative 
Research Bureau, the $176,000 study will be a major 
activity of the Department's expanding program of 
research and development in new teaching methods and 
techniques. It should give students a powerful tool 
that will enable them to explore both simple and complex 
mathematical relationships without becoming involved in 
long, tedious computations that might take many hours 
or class periods to perform manually. If we can develop 
the proper classroom procedures for the use of the com- 
puter, we may succeed in extending the high school stu- 
dent's grasp of the mathematical sciences well into the 
college level. It is not unreasonable to anticipate 
that every school in the state might someday be tied to 
a computer, not only for the teaching of mathematics 
but as a teaching aid for other subjects as well. 

The Academically Talentad 

Fundamental to the success of the American educa- 
tional enterprise is the acceptance of the equality of 
opportunity concept. Our schools must meet the needs of 
all the children of all the people. This means that no 
segment of the school population can be neglected. Pro- 
grams must be developed for the physically and mentally 
handicapped, the emotionally disturbed, and those whose 



<58 



10 

behavior and performance are at normal levels or deviate 
only slightly from the norm. 

Massachusetts has long been a leader in providing 
such programs and many "firsts" have been credited to 
us. However, adequate provision for those who are 
categorized as gifted or superior has progressed at a 
disappointing, snail-like pace. Too many have accepted 
the premise that academically talented students will 
"get by anyway," and the lowest of priorities has been 
accorded their needs. Other communities have settled 
for a single program caring for just a handful of stu- 
dents, but one which can be cited for purposes of 
publicity at appropriate times. 

In recent years the Department re-expressed con- 
cern for the apparent neglect of the talented and steps 
were taken to do something about it. In 1960 a Study 
Commission was appointed and following a comprehensive 
survey specific recommendations were presented to the 
General Court (See The Education of Academically 
Talented Pupils -- authorized by Chapter 61 of the 
Resolves of 1960) . Among these was a matching plan 
whereby the State and local community would share costs. 
An initial State grant of $250,000 was requested to 
establish pilot projects. This past year legislative 
action was taken but only in the amount of $50,000. 



Hi) 



11 

A modest start has been made and projects approved for the 
public school systems of Arlington, Greenfield, Marblehead, 
North Adams, Sharon, Woburn, Hingham, Haverhill, Taunton 
and Union #39 (Granville, Sandisfield, Southwick and 
Tolland) . 

More significantly, a Supervisor for the Academically 
Talented has been added to the Department staff. Pre- 
viously these important responsibilities had to be carried 
on a marginal time basis by others in the Division of 
Elementary and Secondary Education. With the present 
momentum, substantial gains are anticipated on a state- 
wide basis in the immediate future. 

Tkz VJ6 advantaged 

Equality of opportunity sounds an even more impera- 
tive call to action when one considers the education of 
the disadvantaged. In an earlier section of this Report, 
mention was made of the Elementary and Secondary Education 
Act of 1965. Its aim is to alleviate the economic and 
cultural ills of the less fortunate. The President noted 
the close relationship between poverty and the lack of 
educational development when he launched this country's 
"war on poverty" several months ago. Specifically, the 
Act is designed to help those children whose family income 
is less than $2,000 annually. Although many citizens 



30 



12 



assume that such a program is geared solely to the 
needs of several southern states and a few of our - 
larger cities, the fact remains that all areas will 
become beneficiaries. It is interesting to note 
that Massachusetts, as one of the more affluent states, 
does not have a single community that lacks families 
in the $2,000-or-less income bracket. 

Once again, the Commonwealth took appropriate 
action in meeting certain needs of disadvantaged 
children and youth before the Congress or legislatures 
in a majority of our sister states acted. A companion 
measure to the statute on the academically talented, 
Chapter 650 of the Acts of 1964 authorized programs 
on the basis of state "community partnership. A 
similar amount was appropriated, i.e., $50,000 under 
a matching formula, and to date the following towns 
and cities have been awarded grants: Springfield, 
Easton, Holyoke, Sharon, Arlington, and Boston. 

For purposes of coordination, the Board of 
Education has assigned a Supervisor for Disadvantaged 
Programs to the Division of Elementary and Secondary 
Education, and we look to an increasingly effective 
program for these worthy young citizens. 



31 



13 



Education and Race Relation* 

Last year's Annual Report devoted considerable 
space to the work of the distinguished Advisory 
Committee on Racial Imbalance and Education. On 
April 15 the Committee presented its final report 
(a 132 page document entitled., Because It Is Right-- 
Educationally ) and because of state and national 
demand, several thousand have been published in 
printed form. In addition, a 16 page scriptographic 
summary has been developed which may be found with 
the main report in state, local and institutional 
libraries under the title. Highlights of "The Kiernan 
Report . " 

Among other recommendations of the Advisory 
Committee was one to offer a course in race relations 
for professional and layman alike. Under a $125,000 
grant to the Department by the U. S. Office of Educa- 
tion, such a course will be offered this fall on 
educational television. Originating on WGBH-TV 
(Channel 2) , subsequent broadcasts will be made avail- 
able to other parts of the nation through educational 
television network facilities. Several institutions 
of higher learning including the University and our 
State Colleges, and a number of school systems will 
offer credit for this teacher-training endeavor. 



3^ 



14 

The course, which constitutes national recognition 
of the Department's leadership in the sensitive field 
of human relations, will consist of a series of lec- 
tures and panel discussions by leading social scientists 
and educators. Topics to be televised will include 
the concept of race, the nature of prejudice, the 
history of the Negro, federal and state responsibilities 
regarding civil rights, as well as techniques and 
methods for educating underprivileged children and 
youth . 

Ce.nte.1 Von. Re.6za>ick And Ve.ve.lopme.nt 

Several years ago the writer in collaboration 
with the U. S. Commissioner of Education and the Dean 
of Harvard's Graduate School of Education, attempted 
to find a source of funds to be used in setting up 
a research and development center. Its primary pur- 
pose was to provide a clearinghouse service for 
research and curriculum materials. Particular emphasis 
was to be placed on field testing some of the newer 
practices and disseminating the results on a state-wide 
or regional scale. The latter point had as its imme- 
diate objective the elimination of an indefensible lag 
in getting school systems to accept and put into 
practice better methods and materials. 



33 



15 

Unfortunately, anticipated federal financing did 
not materialize at that time, but the project was not 
forgotten. Utilizing another set of partners, a 
similar center was authorized this year and a $2,400,000 
five year contract consumated with the U. S. Office of 
Education. The center will concentrate on a major 
research effort to determine how individual, social, 
cultural, and other differences affect learning. Its 
official name will be the Center for Research and 
Development on Educational Differences and it will be 
located on the Harvard campus. In addition to Harvard 
and the Commonwealth's Department of Education, the 
partners are five cooperating school systems (Boston, 
Cambridge, Concord, Lexington, and Newton) , Educational 
Services Incorporated, the Association of Independent 
Schools, the New England School Development Council, 
and others. 

AN EVER WIDENING FOCUS 

Not too many years ago, teachers and administrators 
could concentrate on the business of the school. This is 
not to say that problems were nonexistent, or that programs 
were more narrowly conceived and defined. As a matter of 
record a review of the Department's Reports beginning in 



.4 1 



16 

1838 will reveal many recurring issues. This fact was 
underscored when we republished, in conjunction with the 
Fiftieth Anniversary Convention, the program for the 
First Annual Conference of Massachusetts Superintendents 
of Schools held in 1915. Among topics scheduled for 
discussion were: Consolidation of Schools, Transportation 
of Pupils, Measuring Efficiency in Supervision, Pro- 
fessional Standards Among Superintendents, State Certifica- 
tion of Teachers, Improvement of School Administration, 
and Why Every School System Should Include A Kindergarten. 

The most significant change affecting the pro- 
fession today, involves controversial and perplexing 
issues which extend well beyond the schodl and its 
adjacent playground. The focus has been broadened to 
include issues affecting mankind everywhere — from assisting 
struggling new nations to resolving problems of a complex 
society in the highly developed countries of the world. 
Poverty, ignorance, crime, disease, war and threats of 
war, are but a few of the issues for which our system of 
education seeks solutions. Challenges and debates are 
common, not only on the world and national scenes, but 
within and beyond the borders of the 351 communities which 
make up the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By way of 
summary a few of the controversies, needs, plans, and 
programs involving the Department are listed below. 






1 

35 



17 

kutkotuLty Of, Tkz Commit ^jJonzK 

Chapter 69, section 1 gives to the Commissioner of 
Education "supervision of all educational work supported 
in whole or in part by the Commonwealth." In keeping 
with this statutory charge he must collect information 
relative to the condition of the public schools. During 
the course of his duties, and following instructions 
from the Board of Education, he sought census informa- 
tion on the number of white and non-white pupils enrolled 
in the Commonwealth's public schools. The legal basis 
for such a census had been determined previously by 
the Attorney General. All but one school system complied 
with the request (See School Committee of New Bedford 
and others us_. Commissioner of Education and another) 
and furnished the information promptly. Among other 
contentions the School Committee held that the census 
was not authorized by law, it would serve no useful 
educational purpose, and that the racial population of 
the City did not lend itself to drawing realistic lines 
of distinction between white and non-white students. 

During the year the Supreme Judicial Court ruled 
as follows on the case: (1) The enumeration and grant 
of the Commissioner's powers and duties in General Laws, 
Chapter 69 by implication give to him a substantial 
range of incidental authority to do in an ordinary and 



* * * » 



3f 



18 

reasonable manner those things required for the efficient 
exercise of the powers and satisfactory performance of 
duties. (2) The allegations that the Commissioner was 
acting under an improper delegation of legislative 
authority were not supported. "At most," the Court 
said, "he is collecting information from public officials 
in matters pertinent to his and their defined duties 
pursuant to statutory authority." (3) The classification 
of whites and non-whites was one which the courts and 
the Bureau of the Census found practical to apply in 
New Bedford and elsewhere. (4) Reasonable accuracy 
should be possible for a school committee, school 
officers, and teachers "who are not reluctant to cooper- 
ate with the Commissioner by furnishing him with 
information to which he is entitled by statute." (5) 
The relevance of the information sought cannot reasonably 
be questioned. "We (The Supreme Judicial Court) take 
judicial notice of the fact that controversial racial 
problems currently affect the administration of public 
schools, even in Massachusetts, and that information 
about the racial composition of student bodies may be 
of value to the Department's work." 

Ba.6ic Education foK Kdnlt6 

The 88th Congress concerned itself with the total 



37 



19 

spectrum of education and enacted legislation of bene- 
fit to adults as well as the in-school population. 
Specifically, Public Law 88-452 (Title II, Part B) 
provides for older citizens who wish to overcome the 
major handicap of illiteracy. In Massachusetts it is 
estimated that a quarter million adults who are 
eighteen years of age and over, have had less than six 
years of schooling. A grant of $381,461 has been made 
to the Department for the purpose of establishing a 
basic education program to care for these citizens. 

Those who desire such instruction will be counseled 
and tested prior to assignment to one of two levels, 
viz., a basic level comprising grades 1 through 4, and 
an upper level coinciding with work undertaken in 
grades 5 to 8. The training program should equip these 
people to obtain or retain productive, profitable 
employment, as well as to develop their capabilities 
in meeting their adult responsibilities as citizens in 
a free society. 

Regional Ce.nte.n.6 

During the earlier periods of the Department's 
history, regulatory and service responsibilities were 
relatively limited. Legislative concern for such 
programs as teacher certification, caring for the 



3«S 



20 

handicapped, the establishment and enforcement of mini- 
mum standards, regional schools, and the construction 
of buildings are of fairly recent vintage. To 
demonstrate the growth factor, the last named responsi- 
bility might be mentioned. In 1948, Chapter 645 was 
enacted and the School Building Assistance Program set 
in motion. Since that date, 1,365 schools have been 
authorized costing over one billion dollars. The 
Commonwealth's share approximates $400,000,000 excluding 
the very limited cost of operating the Division. These 
new elementary, secondary, and vocational schools can 
be found in every section of the state and require the 
services of a qualified professional staff during the 
planning, construction and evaluation periods. 

Other Divisions could be cited to show the need 
for immediate and effective services in the field. 
Among these would be the Divisions of University 
Extension, the Blind, Vocational Education, Civic Edu- 
cation, Special Education, and Elementary and Secondary 
Education. The last named serves over 1,000,000 children 
and youth enrolled in 391 community and regional school 
systems. To attempt service and/or regulatory responsi- 
bilities from a headquarters building in Boston is 
becoming less desirable with each passing year. Not 
only must local school officials wait for lengthy periods 



IX) 



21 

in order to receive on-the-scene Department counsel and 
advice, but much time and money are wasted in travel. 

On a small scale certain of the Divisions maintain 
regional offices and these have proved their worth. At 
this stage of the Department's development, and in view 
of substantially increased responsibilities under 
Chapter 572 of the Acts of 1965, it now appears feasible 
to launch a system of greatly strengthened regional 
offices. Although subject to review following a com- 
prehensive study, six regional education centers could 
be developed with the headquarters unit serving the 
metropolitan Boston area. The others would serve the 
Central, Southeastern, Northeastern, Connecticut Valley, 
and Berkshire areas of the Commonwealth. Headed by an 
Assistant Director responsible to the Division Director 
and the Associate Commissioner for Curriculum and 
Instruction, each regional center would carry a small 
complement of generalists and specialists. In turn, 
teams from the headquarters staff in Boston supplemented 
by Ad Hoc Committees from colleges and universities as 
well as neighboring school systems, could be used in 
rendering professional services in the region. A few 
school surveys have been conducted using this staff 
procedure and they too have proved successful. 



40 



22 

If pilot projects are preferred at this time, it 
is recommended that two such regional centers be 
established and evaluated following a two year operation. 
Substantial funds would not be necessary from the state 
and some savings would be realized as a result of 
personnel redeployment. Also, it is hoped that federal 
monies under Title V of the new Act will be available 
for regional centers. 

Tkz (laz^tion oj kiitomatto n 

In several fields of endeavor, particularly business 
and industry, it is recognized that we are living in an 
automated, computerized society. Few plants are con- 
structed today without including a sophisticated system 
of computers and data processing. Unfortunately com- 
parable systems are conspicuous by their absence among 
our schools. In far too many cases operations which 
should have been modernized some time ago, are being 
conducted on a manual basis causing bottlenecks and 
inexcusable delays. 

In recent years a start has been made on a more 
efficient data processing center, but the equipment is 
far from adequate to meet present day demands. It is 
imperative that the Department get to the users, current 
information without an interminable time lag which makes 



41 



23 

such information of little or no value. Among service 
needs are the certification of teachers (active staff 
now approaching 50,000), enrollment projections, census 
data, financial planning, per capita costs, testing pro- 
grams, management control techniques, innovations and 
research information, in-service training, school con- 
struction, and many others. Conceivably a core system 
could be adapted to meet the basic legal needs of school 
systems on such matters as subject requirements, attend- 
ance laws, teacher appointment or tenure, and retirement. 

A few larger or regional school systems have estab- 
lished data processing units although most of the work 
to date involves important but relatively unsophisticated 
procedures such as assignment of pupils to classes, and 
report card information. As mentioned in the discussion 
of the Department's computer project in mathematics, a 
state-regional-local partnership involving the broad 
spectrum of educational data processing would return 
immeasurable dividends without the expenditure of sub- 
stantial funds by any one of the partners. 

LEGISLATION 

For many years it has been customary for the 
Commissioner to include in his Annual Report a summary 
statement pertaining to the new Acts and Resolves. A 



42 I 



24 

review of these summaries reveals a pattern of productive 
and non-productive years. This does not suggest that 
certain legislative enactments are unimportant or meaning- 
less, but rather that the passage of major bills affecting 
education appears to be on an interval or cycle basis. 
As an example, the 1948 session of the General Court 
authorized a long sought and substantial increase in State 
aid, as well as the passage of one of the nation's finest 
school building assistance programs (See companion measures 3 
Chapters 643 and 645 of the Acts of 1948). Following this 
very productive session, several years elapsed before 
major laws affecting the Commonwealth's educational system 
were placed on the statute books. Other periods of our 
history could be selected to demonstrate this point. 

In preparing for the present legislative year, it 
was agreed that the Department and allied agencies would 
concentrate on a single proposal, i.e., the recommendations 
of the Massachusetts Education Study Commission resulting 
from the two and one half year study. Earlier mention was 
made of Chapter 572 and its anticipated impact on our 
school and collegiate systems. As a consequence of the 
above agreement, the following list of recently enacted 
statutes cannot be categorized as of major importance. For 
the most part they deal with corrective measures, necessary 
clarifications of previously engrossed bills, or acts 



25 

dealing with individual communities and regions rather than 
the State as a whole. 



43 



ACTS 



Chapter 

34 - An Act clarifying the licensing of correspond- 
ence school salesmen. Approved February 15, 1965 

43 - An Act repealing the law authorizing the grant- 
ing of high school diplomas to certain students 
entering the armed services of the United States. 
Approved February 16, 1965. 

132 - An Act relative to the appointment of teachers 
in the universities and colleges of the Common- 
wealth who are blind. Approved March 9, 1965. 

144 - An Act validating the establishment of the 

Blackstone Valley Vocational Regional School 
District and validating in certain respects the 
proceedings taken by the Town of Northbridge at 
the nineteen hundred and sixty- four annual town 
meeting . Approved March 15, 1965. 

157 - An Act placing certain regional school districts 
and regional vocational school districts under 
civil service law. Approved March 15, 1965. 

164 - An Act authorizing school committees to hire 

aides for assignments in laboratories and class- 
rooms. ' Approved March 18, 1965. 

172 - An Act providing that certain teacher or admin- 
istrative interns need not be certified by the 
Board of Education. Approved March 18, 1965. 

179 - An Act authorizing cities and towns to appro- 
priate money to provide indemnity insurance to 
protect against loss sustained in indemnifying 
teachers in certain cases. Approved March 24, 
1965. 

204 - An Act providing that a town may vote to trans ; 
previously appropriated funds without the prior 
recommendation of the finance committee . 
Approved March 26, 1965. 






V 



44 



26 



Chapter 

208 - An Act relative to the organization of the school 
department of the City of Boston by the School 
Committee of said City. Approved March 29, 1965. 

217 - An Act placing the school buildings in the City 
of Somerville under the control of the School 
Committee of said City. Approved March 29, 1965. 

221 - An Act requiring school committees to administer 
aptitude tests annually to certain mentally 
retarded children. Approved March 29, 1965. 

276 - An Act providing that school librarians and school 
library supervisors or coordinators be given tenure 
in the same manner as teachers . Approved April 7, 
1965. 

345 - An Act authorizing certain non-citizens to be 

certified to teaching positions . Approved April 20, 
1965. 

404 - An Act authorizing school committees to designate 
the locations of highway safety stations for chil- 
dren awaiting a school bus. Approved May Z, 1965. 

471 - An Act providing that certain professional libra- 
rians, sub-professional librarians and pages shall 
be exempt from civil service law. Approved May 17, 
1965. 

502 - An Act providing for a plaque containing the words 
"For God and Country" to be placed in a conspicuous 
location in every public school building within 
the Commonwealth. Approved May 25, 1965. 

572 - An Act to improve and extend educational facilities 
in the Commonwealth. Approved June 28, 1965. 



RESOLVES 

Chapter 

48 - Resolve increasing the scope of the specval commvs- 
sion established to make an investigation and study 
relative to retarded children and the training facil 
ities available therefor . Approved June 8, 19C5. 



45 



27 

Chapter 

> 

Resolution encouraging the Department of Education 
to foster in all public schools of the Commonwealth 
the recitation of the fourth stanza of the National 
Anthem^ at the opening of the daily school session. 

Adopted in Senate, February 25, 1965. 

Concurrence in House, March 31, 19&5. 



CON CLUSION 

In terms of organization patterns, three distinct 
periods mark the Commonwealth's history of education. The 
first extends from the establishment of the Board of 
Education in 1837 to the reorganization of State Depart- 
ments in 1919. From that year until 1947 , the Board 
performed advisory functions only with numerous decision- 
making responsibilities left to the judgment of the 
executive and legislative branches of government. Over 
the past eighteen years a greatly strengthened Board of 
Education administered important school, collegiate, and 
adult education programs. With the passage of Chapter 572 
on June 28, 1965, we reach the end of an era and the 
beginning of a fourth period of our history. 

Because the present Board of Education saw the need 
for much higher standards with even broader responsibilities 
being vested in a State Board, the members initiated the 
request for an in-depth study as early as-1960. They 
recognized that recommendations stemming from such a study 



4(> 



28 

might well call for a new organization and their being 
legislated out of existence. Their simple guideline in 
this matter, as in all other matters during their tenure, 
was "What is best for the Commonwealth." 

I am confident that citizens everywhere share my 
sincere appreciation for the competent and devoted services 
of those distinguished citizens who have been members of 
the several boards which are to be abolished under the new 
Act. Handicapped as they were by inadequate financing, 
theirs has been a monumental achievement. I am particu- 
larly grateful to those members of the Board of Education 
who have given so generously of their talents and energies 
in the quest for a superior school and collegiate system. 
They are worthy heirs of Horace Mann and the members of 
the first Board of Education who strove so valiantly to 
place Massachusetts in the forefront of American education. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Owen B. Kiernan 
Commissioner of Education 



June 30, 1965 



47 



BOARD OF COLLEGIATE AUTHORITY 



The Board of Collegiate Authority conducted five public hear- 
ings during the year July 1, 196k to June 30, 1965 on Articles of 
Organization, Certificates of Change of Name or Certificates of 
Change of Purpose referred to it by the Secretary of State as 
required in Section 30, Chapter 69, General Lavs as amended. The 
Board approved the following: 



Eastern Nazarene College, Quincy 



The Certificate of Change of Purpose of the Trustees of 
Eastern Nazarene College was approved by the Board at its meeting 
of November 2U, 196k, This approval authorized the Trustees to 
confer the degree of Master of Arts (with Major in Religion) in 
addition to those degrees already authorized. Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Theology and Bachelor of Arts in 
Theology, Bachelor of Music, Associate in Arts and Associate in 
Science* 



Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology. Inc.. Shrewsbury 



The Certificate of Change of Purposes of the Trustees of 
Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology, Inc., Shrewsbury 
to confer the earned degree of Doctor of Science and to award 
such appropriate honorary degrees as are usually conferred by col- 
leges in this Commonwealth excluding medicine was approved by the 
Board of Collegiate Authority on May 27, I965. 



Bradford Junior College. Haverhill 



The Board of Collegiate Authority at its meeting of June 30, 
1965 approved the Certificate of Change of Purpose to authorize 
the trustees of Bradford Junior College, Haverhill to confer the 
degree of Associate in Arts. 



Springfield Technical Institute. Springfield 

Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 562 of the Acts of 1963 
(c.71, S.37A) the Board of Collegiate Authority at its meeting of 
March 25 • 1965 approved the request of the School Committee of the 
City of Springfield to grant the degree of Associate in Applied 
Science to graduates of the two year course at Springfield Technical 
Institute. 



48 



-2- 



Thia lav, under which the above approval vhs granted, reads in 
part a3 follo> 



If a school committee or the board of trustees of any- 
industrial, technical, agricultural or vocational school 
subject to this chapter determines that sufficient need 
exists in such school for a course or courses beyond 
secondary school level and designed to prepare students 
for greater opportunities for employment in industrial, 
agricultural and technical occupations, it nay submit in 
writing its plans for such course or courses to the 
state department of education. Upon the written approval 
of Bald plans by said department, such school committee or 
board of trustees may establish and maintain such extended 
courses of instruction on a technical institute level, 
and public funds may be appropriated for said purpose; 
provided, that such courses of instruction conform to 
such standards as said department may establish, and 
are maintained by said school committee or said trustees 
under the general regulations of the department. Any such 
school may use the designation "technical institute" 
with respect to the maintenance of such courses at such 
school, and the school committee or trustees of such 
school may, subject to the approval of the division of 
vocational education and the board of collegiate authority, 
grant the degree of Associate in Applied Science to persons 
who complete such course or courses of instruction. ••• 



4<) 



BOARD OF COLLEGIATE AUTHORITY 



The Board conducted three public hearings during the year 
1963-6U on Articles of Organization, Certificates of Change of 
Name or Certificates of Change of Purpose referred to it by the 
Secretary of State as required in Section 30, Chapter 69, General 
Lavs, as amended. The following were approved; 



Atlantic Union College,. South Lancaster 

The Certificate of Change of Purpose of the Trustees of 
Atlantic Union College, South Lancaster for authority to confer 
the degree of Associate in Nursing was approved December 19, 1963. 



Eastern Nazarene College. Quincy 

The Board approved at its meeting of October 2k , 1963 the 
Certificate of Change of Purpose of the Trustees for Eastern Nazarene 
College, Wollaston for authority to confer the degrees of Associate 
in Arts and Associate in Science, in addition to degrees already 
authorized. 

Springfield. College. Springfield 

The Certificate of Change of Purpose or tne iJirectors of 
Springfield College, Springfield for authority to confer the degree 
of Bachelor of Affei in addition to degrees already authorized was 
approved by the Board of Collegiate Authority at its meeting of 
October 2U, 1963. 



- . 50 

AMNUAL fttPORT 
Division of iSleraentary and Secondary Education 
Yaar Ending Juna 30, 1965 



This annual report may wall ba tha final ona for the entity 
known aa tha Division of Elementary and "eoondary Education. 
Just before the close of tha fiscal year Governor John A. Volpa 
signed into law Chapter 5?2 of the Acts of 1%5. Thia legis- 
lative enactment provided v ov tha reorganization of the Depart- 
ment of Sducatlon in accordance with tha pace datlons of 
the Massachusetts Education Study Commission. 



Tha new legislation which oes Into effect on September 
26, 1965 reduces the number of divi Ions by about two-thirds 
to five. No provision is msde for a Division of Elements r 
and Secondary Education. Tha many responsibilities of this 
Division will ba Included with others under tha new Division 
of Curriculum and instruction headed by an Associate Commissioner. 

Even without the general reorganisation of the Department, 
a change in the structure of the division of Elementary aj 
Secondary Education seems warranted. New State and Federal 
prog raiis and the expansion of present responsibilities require 
an expanded framework of or animation with provision for inter- 
roadiate level administrative positions. An indication of tha 
scope of the changea arid the future possibilities will be found 
in the reports of personnel and programs which follow* 

■ ■ ■ onne l 

The paat year marked the close of a lonr oareer of public 
aervlce to the students in the schools of the Commonwealth aa 
Mrs. Martina Mao Dona Id Drlrooll retired. Mrs. Drlsooll, aa 
of October 1, 1%; , hun,- up her pitch-pipe after twenty-seven 
years of leadership and support of Music Kducstion. 

Three resignations were accepted. Mr. C. Louis Cedrone, 
Supervisor in Pducstion (Tlementary) rsi ned December 18, 1961 
to accept the prlncipalship of the Hillside School, Needham. 
Mr. Frank P. Chrapliwy, Superviaor in Education (Conservation) 
returned to his previous assignment aa a hi^h school teacher 
in New Jersey aa of September 9, 1961;. Mr. John P. Ho r ;an re- 
signed aa enior Supervisor in Education (Guidance and Counseling) 
on September 1. 196U to become Dear, of students at Wachuset 
Community Colle ;. . 



51 



Welcomed es division staff members were the persons listed 
b«low, indicating an axpsnuion of eervlees in addition to tha 
replacement of tha four staff members who laft enart. ent service. 



December 2% 194b 
Deeeaber 28 , 1964 
December 28, 1961* 
December 23, 196J+ 
January U, 1945 
February 1# 1965 
-ebruary 1, 1965 
February 1, 1965 
May 3. 1965 



< 1111am F. Kelly, Supervisor 
In Education (Elementary) 

Robert • Laeey, Supervisor in 

Education (Music) 

Ernest J. tfassone, Supervisor in 
Education (Modern Foreign Languagea) 

Stewart S. Sargent, Senior Supervlaor 
in Education (Science ) 

Joseph g, Beatable, Senior supervisor 
in Education (Guidance end Counseling) 



L. rshliar, Jr* 9 Supervisor 
in Education ( Conservation) 

Robert L. banning, Supervisor in 
Education (business sad Office) 



A Hie W # Scruggs, Senior Supervisor 
in Education (Compensatory Services) 

Joseph S. Killory, Aaaiatant Direotor 
of the Division 



Personnel additions Indicated above did not provide for 
additional general supervisors at either tne elementary or tne 
secondary level. Staff members attempt through continued ex- 
tensive travel to wake up for a shortage of supervisory per- 
sonnel to service the needa of the aohools o ' tha Cassaonwaslth. 
During the past year a total of 1537 vis itat lone were made to 
Softools aeroas the length and breadth of the Ceaeaoweelth and 
nineteen via its ware made to the State Colleges. 

Supplementing the program of aehool visitation. Division 
staff members organised and conducted aeven state-wide oonfer- 
er.cea together with forty-six workshops for loc 1 or regional 
groups. In twenty-five instances ataff members attended work- 
shops conducted by other groups. 






Til* Division members continued to participate actively in 
the evaluation aetlvltles of tho Vow England Association of 
Collegee and Secondary Sohoola. Individuals part leipe ted in 
seventeen surveys conducted by tho Association. Tho Division 
worked eloaaly with tho Massachusetts Junior High School 
Prlncipale' Association in Ita pioneer activities in tho do* 
rel epstn t of a sot of evaluation proeeduree for junior high 
schools* Tho Junior high schools in Sharon and in Andovor were 
the first to bo evaluated. 

In response to requests, Division personnel made 166 
addreeeee to various groups* Tho supervisors were participants 
at professional Meetings s totsl of 97$ times within Massachusetts 
and tk times st various out-of-stete conferences. 

Supervisory Actlvltlee - Rational Defense Sducatlon Act 

Tho previsions of the national Defense Education Act, 
Ft** 85-861*, were extended and broadened by Congressional action, 
Under Title III five now eubjeets wore added bringing tho number 
of "critical eubjeete*' to eight and now including English, 
el vice, reading, geography , and history aa well aa the esrlisr 
"critical subjects*, science, mathematics, and modern foreign 
lengusgee* Tho important change in Title V-A extended t: ? 
provisions for guidance and counseling, and testing to elenentsry 
sshool pupils* 

Federal guideline a and regulations wore sent lete in f laoal 
year. Most of the Division activity under tho expanded Titlea 
was concentre tod on developing State proeeduree, guidelines, 
and application forms. Tho State Plana were approved too let* 
in tho flecal year to permit local achool district activities 
under the new regulations* 

Once again Meesaohusetts achool districts took full ad- 
vantage of tho available funde in tho acquisition program of 
Title III* fteallotted funde were received in the amount of 
•188, 333*00 bringing the total Federal funds expended to 
11,5*6,958*00 for 9*8 projects. 

The supervisory activitioa under Title v-a were directed 
toward tho improvement of guldanoe service e in the looal achool 
systems and toward tho evaluation of requeste for relmbureement 
for approved progress! • A relmbureement of 1118,012.00 was made 
to school systems for tho testing programs in grades 8 and 10 
which assisted 21*3.865 studente. A totsl of 2*7<'~ schools mot 
the provielens of tho State Plan. Theae approved progress* in 
uldance and counseling, and testing benefitted 300,356 pupils 
in these schools. An smount of #287 9 U°7«00 in Federel Funds 
was cent to theee communities as relmbureement* 



w 






Screening of applications and interviewing procedure* 
wsre completed In tins for reeoussendstlons to bo mode to too 
Board of Sduostlon. It Is anticipated, as a roault of Board 
aetlon, that twelve additional supervisors will begin Depart- 
ment service under Title lit early in the next flaoal year. 
These supervisors will be assigned to the added subjsots of 
English, history, reading, civics, end | 'vrephy. 

The Elementary and Secondary Aet of 1965 

President Johnson signed on foster weekend this educational 
legislation which will affect Department and Division sotlvltlss 
during the scaling fiscal years. Title V of the sot provides 
nearly one-half million dollars in Federal funds for"beef ing- 
up" the Deportment staff services. 

The administration of two titles of this now leglalatlon 
(Public Law 6fKL0) has boon assigned to the Division of Bio* 
mentary and Secondary Education* Title I provides funds for 
programs to meet the needs of students who are educationally 
disadvantaged living in areas having high concent ret ions of 
low-income families. Title III supports the establishment of 
supplementary educational centers fmt demonstrations of omplary 
educational practices and for providing aervlees not currently 
available in sufficient quantity and quality. 

It la expected that Federal Regulations and Guidelines 
for all Titles will bo prepared ao that local school districts 
may begin to participate in the Pall of 1965. 






During the i9&H>? \ eefcool year the ooooielaMr e4u 
euporvieos** cor* w Imiftd ttbroug?} |Afinn1HCi consuit30vion# And field 
vieite to provide loederehip end eorvloe to thO ftMOBimwiltb'o 

|lftibXitt OOOXlttflery eOhOOX&* 



Hie lnoe»tioa of the evaluation iifuiuwiii of the Sen 
eeeoatettlon of Colle@ee ami fl e oond o ry mMli in X?£ : , 

nt of £duoe&lon hoe iHMiijai'Olloaljj 
provided ©treats leftten^lfp and in a ewviee role he* done o&iem 
to teplenent thle evaluation pro&rera £hrota$>oitfc the ffinwirraltf 



m wwfciag eeeperetlvely vita tfiie evaluation yroaro a i fro* 
ite ymgbw&m under the Association, Hie PepeiFtoemt bee reeeg* 
nlotd ie ■oetmtfcll al m e i it. n of the uii'i'iheoju tiuiiMjrfl iBSMroveaent of 
edseetioo ttaretighettt tbe niinimwee>e1fiti_ 



Xn the X96h*"65 oohooft joai' w n 1 ^ *tiniu of t he fl e we m int a l fth * a 



wmmih hlidi eehooiXa eenBleteA ™** evaluation a ee 
the year De^ertoent of arttaiolUuu 1 1> » i eimi i lie 1 1 voa 



to ten of the vial time eeenitteeea At **** eoee tlae> 
e pep»eont»t sve fron tbe D epor tme n t of adtoetlon f e r» t l oc 



jjgjgNe tt 

Boeton latin Old ft oob oetor BeoUnel 

Olrle» nt^n South SedUr 

rNpojei*' ftjjeju'Tjm'ti ftejs£eneX l^thento EegxoneX 

eeev «enMejeee«er veneeeB 
BaettiejBpton 



Qg» o t Berrlngton Wenaoutix 



Duplnc the l96?i-6? ^eer, «ie aentev eteervieor eoattamd 
e ooneitltent in seeletlng eehoole to plan for tbetr 



At the 90«aeet of the Sehool OeeMttteee of Sou«itndge 9 
teetfbuvR t end weetport, tbe e eQo nd e ry edueetlos fupmlK 
fy tietn e t ed in mxrmym of their eeeondery eonoole. fmm *»« 
the Senior Supervieor eeelated tiie neieeehueette Junior Blah 



54 



r 



55 



School Principalis « Aaaooiation In >Uwniag and 
Program for Junior ixi/.i. s&iooia. 



2** rceto*$ooce*3 Atauatl Sonforonco of tjho 
Aaaoaln ; ji j? Junior and Senior Kl*ti School ?rinoipal* uaa 

;ota> Collago at Pyawdntfian on ?ua*jay ami 
vatooaCtVt M** #v;?l, 2^;. 

*ba Confaronee tUria, "Quality Education in tba 8ixti*a 9 * 
*hlch vaus veal raooivoa b? tha 300 p«rt.tolpaats t conoamaa 

. *!ia following 
3* uaro prt**&ts9& t^r paaollata f*a» all porta of tb» 

^#%MNPHB^Biffn^a^MjBjMK,wMiwv *V-w *»a****"Mr d*n» * i» •\^^*^Wp bm 4- ^a>faavaaaj^BB£4*. 4 £aa'9p ajBjtaaA a^ajp as^ataaa^Faa £ t^^aiA v^b 

&fW0MtP ^traction, 4 Look at Cooperative 

ajaav Urm xww » v^^a*aa w wnaaMaajav ••^"aaaaaaaaj^ ai^^p* aw^a* w A «^ ^^j^j £ 

^^^^^^^^^^^^ jP ^^ ^^"'^^T^^ ^B^B»i^pB^^^W ^^ ^B™ ^B- q0 ^^^W»^BBBBB^^^BB*^B» ^■P^^P^B^™ ^B^BBB^ ^^^^ 

L&tod to C'Ji'jtor l'jO. ftaimirt) af tftai Tmaaanfnaiil ti« Bdaaatlatt 

^■■bbbj, b«b^b^bb> bmpbbbj ^ v^bbjbmmtibb^bibbib ^*«^ ^"^ V W ^^\M^^^^^ ^* Tlr^* ^P** '^■■Jp •^^'•'^▼•••^V "P^ ^P ^ H ^B* •^^^PB^BBf^iBBB^ V4^^WC 

™' ar^aw" j ^ ^ai taa^v <p*p*aj*^* *spa»* m aB^fanvaBv^a ** Aa^M * aajajByia* awaaaaj^B* ■**'^Bapaawa*^i^*«*'^' £ ^#aaara> wmw »o vf^w 

i* ***&lcsr Blob School aanoation, and tot Eola of tha School 
^^i*Tii1ftrtftfir In tha Araa of CoiXoc -tlvo TfajioHlitlmi 

Hau BdMard F* Rtfan* Chalanaai* MftaaajattttfMrtCB Educational 

Oonfaroaao Soavii* aiaaiaa on *!Cba} LaMaiAtiva Outlook for better 

*i^^a'fca^^"^%aw*w" jb a^-%# aa*aav 4PV'iaa'i4ni^a , a a ^FajHBana w&m\ a> ^►^aaiw^af^w *^^ #**«w ■'<*»•■ a a *^^a> a^vaaap^na* 

taarifeuo* Taanl>oi w CoXlo^** ColisabiA oaiv»t»aJLty* a<1<Tia<iiml tfao 
oooforvinoo at tha 4lBnor *a»otioc; on •Quality anfi tba Principal ♦« 
DlXaaaat** 9 

'." . >'r:T' ; : ■■ c, '. '. "-^: ;. : -.•" t> raaj 






Again tSka Division of m^aanlMrf « 

i tim intoirAtlooal Teaohar DavaX 
by Kha U # 3« Offloa of Itfuoation %rl«i tha 
aatnt of atato. 

la Janoa. . , , nlna o^atiila t ra toqpB frow all parto of 

tha uaa&€i 0M|taarfjd la Bootan fair «halr aaal^taiaBft to aaaamitlaa 

Mmfm$Mmmm Hal Ga .i«woalt;;. Tho Tlaaaaahuaatta oomanltlaa 
ltidloatod tbat tha fa * »eP a m arfordad an aacoallatit opportunity 
In davaloping gia j aftta aiirtaiiatiiaitflmii bataaan paoalaa wA aationa. 

«bo foralgn atetniatvatora vara asai^nad to tba followinc 

i 

■MM 




»♦ **ta* a. aajraotaitfjra Bapal north 

r. gajjopl . ciJLlosdDa) Sjf«aoland Lmolcv 

• .:■ .^. :_'^ fftgaoisi lal 



( 






56 




I», JodR # S J«lflMNMMO Zoftlflnd 

Mem 
JM« Mjft 4 M - ■ 



tfoet BaaAttoa 



JiUior.fcon 



fco miSjr.imtias jWmwi «* tfti* pro^raa in « «*otinc In tt* 
lEjiarMMrtr ** which Uk* • wo*t ixitwMrtios awl fttisiulttlac 

•vttaftttian if in IMaga imaliiMftMt) upon* Ml Ml mnp» 

At otfv*r tlm* ihMtos f&© yea* fcfca office of a* 

gMt»f •Bocm^di ItMMp MMtt ; *» 0MMMN&«fe fcilfc 

visitor 9 ftaft «te$*n t Hn^Un^ &£!** land, *** O iwum; » 



IJtt offlfettan %o $he 9«ftia«r <tat3M of 4te off oe of aw 
osvJtoy education Whtefe tittSaftp ttfhftol vlFritafetor*, *on*to»* 
witfc a wrto*** ot»>e«ming *4*kk »«1 wapmi atrtMiling 

<*}*&, *•**•& 'utiaa SOS *t#pet*ll>illt :»* fcfcVO bwn 

or •»«S30«k1 # tomu; t&ew ueret Btafce Advisory Consdttee 
*r£*r of the «e**sl**e* cm Union* w>! Hegtowa 
, HaaftM* of tb* &s* *• Bo*p6 of tfce 
hi Itniwiftary Softool rrtocipal* # -*ooliat?! f npoalb 
sftMr Commotion, Mater or t&* 3a» 
;* Aaaootattor Sogervli&on and OotjtS ?t-I>ev#X- 

■f *n«fjf veer &tutiy on arop««0tt*e f U96j«6£ # 

jwofe-fei)" *a& *fcc Gr#auftto a- id Higher 



Mitel ' U 



«, 







Hi i Mm m $ 



7»«r to oondue* 
«»ro vial 
•ebeola yeetfvir 



• ,* 



r» oos 
Visits 



ox MNttwl 
Si Htooir Ei 



* £MbK ifttf» #t|p^ 

i eTfta* viui r«do during tht m** •obooi 
I^Ubp viol tut natm to Junior uirfa ftOhool* ti^t 
^ p r» vlou» yewir» Vbmem vmv* id jtnrtor blpi 
■w v^.»lt*noo« t^irt a Xar <^ nurtwr of 
it vtr© vie* tod or* v^oial «n»p 
li!8*»» iMi»or j #t 4 onint#ti»e»t olooatag oaB»* 

?ror5dlnc •«rvi<«» A NgoUr visit oncoo* 
u'th tyftnf ntetwil vo stoi'f, rawy of ttio 
li ««vi«v of th* currl«ul\aa # roco^ssitioo 



, i. * 



I ., 






wi**^& lpp*^C^ ^p^^^p^ ^pm jt^p"*£ ^"^^ ^H^p™ ^^pf'^P'^pp J'^^WP' ^pp*-«^pW W P wBI^^WV^MM \v*a* *^-*)HB/%HmI 

Junior 



Junior Hie* **m& *nd Andovar Junior Sigfe school anted in 
? •"ortr.' w ataa In tihi Oovo"* orient if a *ar'or !■"■: ■■*■! 
o*aluation protfrajs in ttoa H a iaWMiftl th of maaaohnaatta. For 
i number of sraare the Comonvealth< n Junior high aehool adterin- 
ietmtore ttmuG? *out the Hatlon, ha** devoted a unit doal of 
atudy and work in preparation for thle progran* the culrai- 
netlng 9**00 of tuoir work was the publication of the 

In o o o p er a tioct with the Maeeaehueette Junior iii^h School 
Principals' Association the Departaont of Education throng* 
tbi Division of Zlmmtfmanr end Secondary Education initiated 
and developed the evaluation progreja* At the &epertuonO f c 
Annual Conraenee for fceoondary school AdninletretorB In 1961 
a fifteen tfflirffrftr coneiittee we appointed to inve*tlg$ate end 
adopt an evaluative instrura&nt anSTto oatnMlili a unlf om 
nroooduvo to bo followed bcr all aoboola* She aoaBdLttce not 

■p^H ^^F^w^^w ^^^^HPF ^P* »1P ^w^Pr ^^ ^PP^PP^^^PF'*'™^^ ^w ^^■F ^^P*P"PW jp^TW^PW^W^«i^P^^P' ^t ^»^^^j^ ^p^^pwp^pr*p^^» ^F ^^^r ^^ ^^^^» W 

perlodiealljr wit:^ Pepertaent off ioiale and in 1963 the pro- 
gran van euff iolentlsr aevoloped to initiate the f iret two 
evaluationa for the 196U*6S> aehool 70a • 

Mthe oloco of the 196V6L rafafftfrl saajr both Sharon and 
Andovar Junior K&gji Schools roportod tha conviction of the 
aalf Hwaluatioti pheee and reo^ueeted t&e ecrvioce of a visiting 
aowlttoc * fiawwgi tha Deparfcnent*a facilities a mater liat 
of feeaahera* a&iini« tretor a , and «upeprlaa*a i*«a oowpilad to 
pvar upon for vlaltlng aanodLttao) cseEsbora* An official of the 
Dooartmnt v&a daai^ia^pd to nm aa ai^aiman of tba f irat 
ovaluation in Sharon* fha fina oalibop of aduoatora on bote 
visitinr;, eomittaaa raaultad in aKcallant avalomtiona, 

tha undp»lylng faator ciotlvatinc: t^da avaluation p to s ra m 
la to inprow junior high aohcol oduoation in :iaaaao!iuaattap 
«ha actiona takan bj tba Sharon and An<v-*ar Juni«r nirfh Schoola # 
ataff f adriiniatration. and Sohool Ooa^dttaaa aartt a groat daal 
of priiaa f aa tMa pilot evaluation ptrogran aat tha pattam far 
otbar Junior hfe^ aohoola owbarkinc **m ttmlr avaluation 



Survava , 

aurvoya of aobool o/ataoa banring Junior 
tad in tba follotttm^ aoanyBitiaat 

UiUiMQabors 




flatp|ttpp9ipa0p^ 








!<*»• 



ft* Junior M# • Mbool reproaontativi 

nok* then off cfMtt vain* to «h» partleipw 
aro too loa4t&g oonf*pono*a in Whlih J-unfc 
Principal* parti ai?afc*4t 

ftai Caaftmao* of Us* M m— ohm«tof 



*^~ A «M. 



%\k&%9 Jtetlaoal Oanfaranoe Nttl* PlaVMi 




r» Association ana the 
>tts Juntos? • .:i^j MtK& 
PrinoipaXa* Aaaoolttticn 

ttalvwrelty «£ Coaooctitfttt Oqpftti'moa 

far Junior f.L;*iTu # -^v.ootiMl 



r 






tti 



ouidakob 



Personnel 



Masseehusetts public school guidance program* hare con- 
tinual ta chow improvement not only as to too number of coun- 
selors employed but olio la the total amount of time assigned 
for guidance activities* The total number of counselors in* 
creased by more than two per cent from 1,183 in 1963-44 to 1,213 
in 1961* -65 • The increase in volume of time ssslgnmont is in- 
dicated by the fact that the number of full-time counselors 
nts incressed by 13.9* from *75 in 1963-1964 to 997 in 19M-1965. 
Further lncrosses are in prospect for 1 765-66 , and thereafter, 
as there develop now programs of eleaentery school guidance 
services* 

To meet the new demand ft* elementary school guidance 
counselors and to keep pace with the continuing demsmd for 
secondary school counselors will require eensldereble effort. 
It is hoped that the State Colleges and the University, ss well 
aa private institutions of higher education, will extend and 
expend their rui dance program training opportunities to Insure 
a supply of guidance personnel of sufficient quality and quantity* 

Since the initiation in 195* of State Deportment activities 
under the National Defence Education Act, the guidance etaff 
has incressed from three to six supervisors. During this seven 
sear interval aeven supervisor have resigned to eecopt other 
positions* The latest reelgnctlon reduces the staff to five* 
As organised thia past year aaeh supervisor haa been responsible 
for more than 90 public secondary schools, s number consldorobly 
in execs a of the recommended ratio of 60-70 schools pmr super- 
visor* By the present method of assignment to more than $0 
public secondary schools each supervisor serves approximately 
200 local ruldanee workers. 



In October of 1964 the Congress amended the national 
Defense Iducetlon Act to extend financial aupport for uidaneo, 
counseling, and testing into public elementary achool redes. 
Since Massachusetts now has more than 1,75° elementary schools, 
additional supervisors must bo employed to promote, develop, 
and service programs In these schools* 

Supervisory Activities 

The primary activity of state supervision is Immediate 
service to Superintendents , Principals, Ouldsnoe Dlreew^s, 
sad Counselors* This activity was aohloved through conteots, 
consultations, snd services rendered through 1*99 local school 
visits, an increase of 119 visits (3?*) over the 370 visits 



U) 



of the previous year. Other activities related to the devel- 
>nt of guidance programs wo rot 



1 i Secondary oehool evaluations • 6 

?. Talks and addreeeea to parent groupef oraa guidance aaso- 
etatlonai college groups j national, area, and roglonal 
conferences j and college eloaaoo - ft 



3 # Radio and T. v. presentations * 9 

k* Attondanoo and participation In profoaalonal nee tinge • 37 

5« Onldonoo workshop* o 16 

6* Guidance Conforonooa m 20 

?• U # S« Off loo of Education Conforonooa m 19 

8* Confereneea of tho Department of Education or ita 

Dlviaiona • 27 

9* Haotlnga of the State Guidance Advisory Council o 16 

10, Mootlngo of tho Now England Counaolor Trains ra Aoooolatlon - 2 

11, Committee meet Inge end oonforonosa of tho Bow ^gl^ajf, 
Conforonoo of tho American Personnel and Suldanoe Association - 2 

12, Cossmlttoo nestings and conferences of the Kaesachueette 
School Counselors Association e 9 

13* Meetings and conferences for tho development of testing 

and guidance prog r ows In private and parochial schools • 9 

1U. Mootlngo of tho American Personnel and auldaneo Aoooolatlon - 1 

15* Conforonooa with persona seeking guldanoo pea it ions - 57 

16. luidanoe surreys end studies m 6 

Publ lest ions 

Three newelettere were published. Publications of prior 
/••»*• "Portels to Careera", *A Challenge to Parente", and 

Tooting for tho Identification and Sneouragement of Able Students 
In Massachusetts " wore In general dsrsand and were distributed 
throu hout tho United States and Conoda. 



A new bulletin "Guidance ervicea In the Elementary School" 
woo publlahed ahortly after tho United States Congress had oissndsd 
the Wat Ions 1 Defense Educstion Aet to provide flnanelal aupport 
for the devel os sss n t and improve.ient of elenontsry sshocl guldanoo 



lit 



program • The bulletin vas the result of e wide ran^e of etudies 
end many eonforenee meetings* Opportunely, this publication 
w«s road? at too very tine whan Congressional action upon tho 
Rational Defence Education set gave elementary school .uidanoe 
the impetua which had baan awaltod for a number of care. Tho 
timeliness of tho publication, oouplod with complimentary cos tents 
by several U. 3. Off loo of Education guidance and publication 
specielists, caused tho firat adition to bo cxheueted within 
a aonth and a aecond edition to bo printed* 

national Defense gdueatlon ftej, Pro^ramc 

Tho major emphasis of supervisory activity has boon on 
matters related to operations in developing approving, and 
reinsure ins local public aecondary aehool guidance, counseling, 
and tasting progreme and private aecondary aehool teating programe 
under toe Mas a a ch us etta State Plan for Title v-a of the latlonal 
Defence Education Act* The observations below eeem pertinent* 

1* Inch yeer since the original enactment of the national 

Defence Education Act. the use of Federal funds to Improve 
local guidance, couneellng, and tec ting programs has 
atlsailated local achoola to expend eve r-lne reccing amounts 
of money In support of guidance programe. In 1961-61; 
Haeeeehueetts public second sry achoola spent :7»1^3#624*28 
for these programe; this year they budgeted f 7.76l,01%27, 
an lnereaae of 1557 ,393 .99 or W, 

2* Tho expenditure by local public aecondary achoola of 

♦7t 761,01^.27 tmc 19.71 tlmee tho £414,685.37 la Federal 
funds provided. In simple tome, Massachusetts public 
eecondary achoola cpent fl$.71 to match each of tho 
Federal dollar alloted for guidance approval and reim- 
bursement In Massachusetts. 

3* * total of 791 public and private secondary achoola 
participated in the Meeeachusctte State Plan progrcji 
for guidance, counseling, and teating under Title V-A 
of the actional Defence Education, Thia waa an addition 
of 137 participanta, 21% over tho 64*4 that participated 
in 1963-61*. 

4. In 1963-61*. 259,233 public secondary school puplla were 
served by approved local guidance, eouneellng, and teating 
progreme, but In 1964-65, 263,21*1* public eecondary school 
pupils, an increase of 10,011 (3*9£) wore provided cuch 
services. For this work in 1964-65, *k06,77U.*5 in rederel 
Fuajda wore used - an lnereaae of ^129,^;. 67 (47'i) above 
the 1963-64 expendituree of 1276,953.1*-. 



- 



t 



r 



K2 



S. *5*U14 privata secondary school pupils voro provided 
totting ssrvloea In 1963-61; j In 1 61* -65, 26,220 private 
secondary aohool pupile, an Ineroaao of 32* wore 
eerved. Federal Funds usod for this tat tine were 
#8 t «^5.12 In 1963-6U and £<M?6.35 la I9n£-6S. fill 
was *o* lnoroasa of 2.3#. 



b3 

kckmaickuj: tai 



The efforts of many people have resulted, finally, In 
the partial reimbursement of a faw communities far expenses 
Incurred in establishing or maintaining program* for academically 
talantad ohlldran of too Commonwealth* While tha total 
reimbursement (l33»000) provided llttla more than a token 
offering, it was a start* 

Pilot programe In Haverhill, Taunton, and Union #39 
(total eoat of £9,000) were approved in January 1965 by the 
Board of Education on the recommends t ion of thla Division 
the Commission on the Academically Talented. In Juno the 
saining funda {$ ?l*,000) wore encumbered for eoemninltlee whose 
programs were approved by too Board with the concurrence of 
the Commission* 

The vast difference between the aaount requested by the 
aoBsaunltlaa and the aaount available made the establishment 
of severe priorities mandatory. Only programs whleh were clearly 
designed for academically talented children wore considered, 
and then, only the eoata of additional personnel and additional 
instructional materials which were "over and above" the eoata 
that could have been reasonably expected if Chapter 651 had 
not been enacted* 

A variety of programa are currently la operation throughout 
the Commonwealth, and the appointment of Mr. Willism 0* Vassar 
as a aonlor supervisor, Academically Tslentod Program, will 
result In a much greater interchange of Information about 
these programs. Hie lntonae interest combined with hla strong 
background, which includes being President-elect of the Rational 
Assoc 1st ion for Sifted Children, will stimulate increased 
activity during the coming year. 

In conclusion, this report would be loss than complete if 
it did not aall attention to the fact that requests totaling 
#1*5,000 were received in time for consideration at the June 
mooting of the Board of Education, aa was previously ind lasted j 
additional requests and inquiries received after that mooting 
totalled more than £ 100,000; and the development of now program* 
In communities without benefit of them st present will increase 
next year 1 a total request even more* 

It is clear, therefore, that greatly inereaaod amounts of 
money are nocessary if programs for the seademieally talented 
are to flourish in the Commonwealth. 



bl 



_, 



During the ?* &r ^ l ~ > th< * inpervloer of Heal* , 

Physical, and Safety Education of the eohoola of one 

hundred Mid twenty«K>ne el t lee una towne* 'diug two 



{ienal eoheole) end •letter. fUtlil and unlvereltlee* 
*er aetivitiee were *a follow** 66 apeafeia^ eiige&enenta, 
27 athletic nectln&a* $ confereneee and 59 nteetln^e with 
eupertatondenta, prlncipale audi phsalcal education teeehera* 

fhva-lonl ttdniiatlon Cenf aron ooa 

¥ho Hneaac >a*tKent oj cation annuel fhyaicel 

Education, creation* and Safety Confer* f*c» vac 

n«ld at the atatler Botel, 3oeten, on Karon 2N*k'7, , ftp, 

eetinated 2*P aleal ed sectors attended, dgg on 

behalf of ?rasi. r >n end 

by ^r» viwen a« -iernan, ?overn3r Volpe, Hem 
of 'a Couacll on Phytic*! neaa* along wi 

Senator »dward Kennedy sent tela .r&fia eo.vra -ia.ir^ our 
atata on Phfaieal Pitnea*. ln*< iaoieftoa* ^, 

^arlea I . ' ee toy« 'n i Kaat aette 

Aaaoclation of Sehooi Coa*itteee # vara | atoovt during 

too oonr»raac*f. 

er aonf erenoee attended wares Naaeaoi< eat a School 
of noaUta, JUeeoehueette Safety Oeunoll* tfew Eralood Safety 
Council 9 Hoc a .nontary «*r. la Conference 

aesaerat, <;£taeaehueetta Junior and Senior High School Principale 
at a, .{aaeaehueette Suparintcnie i k a 

at iSridgewaier Stat* ego, Kaacaehucettc le aeaaittec 

and National Softool Cosattittv sm'ci enee at Prudential 
duildia^, end ^aeaeciiueette State CoXle nfcrenoo at 

&>idge*ater* 



Hony c Xenon tary and Jut.. h eohoola have planned 

excellent a . . * program* to fulfill their own ^iiyaical 

on ■ teeltfe nee la » Our Jepertaent hoe repeated 
that OTary phyeieal education period be prlnarily a period 
of inetr:<;ion in union r*ndamentals, ta uee, ekilla, 

and testing eetivl lac are atroaacd»»»« not a par-jog for 

wJ 



^xa-i.- o*t of 2 ; ?2 high eohoola, there arc only 6w: 

■fl pM 1*1 H Mel || |MMM no aical I ttotj— MtSWHei 

2 achoola act aaide 15 nlnutot a day for vigoroua 

eaerolae. All 2Zi t j nior high eehoole have gyaenaetuAe, 

out out of Uie Mt|# 14 have no phyelial sdueation 



(i5 



Alao, ft* 1,300 ftaa*M*taWf Wfclilll rojw>rtin* # >69 do 



Oartt float** ot M«rit war* present** to tka 4ur>ojMrl *or 
of >\ ; .j*ical &duoatlon fro* tho >t*t*a ^*vy, &lM*nl«, 

Aotary and &lon* 5«rvi£« I ib« In *fa***oh<J**tta* HMMW 
awad* wor« in rt rt* -lag 

proiraa* to -**r tlio aood for a*ro . Leal . utteatiaa tor 

*U 3 > and aduifc* in tfeo *s*jr fttato. 

r>ogf*«y*Yl •-eUiriUoa 

Tho Stato 3»po*¥i*or oi I >duoati™> a#* 1*1*4 or 

ooo ar&ted with the following agonal**, la rcavtara oonaoralag 
Physical r'duoatlon, AtM*Uc«, Heel 1 , *OFo*tion, and 
Safat/i 

otto K*#is T ttot< alaa 

yi&pio Coaoh aj feMI loatiarlanda aonaarttia^ tho aov aot-top 

/oi.'ii u4u*atlcm *r. program** 



Son 1 n -1st Ian Aaaoolatioa (Ho* England Qouadll) 

?no Ajatrloaa Sat tonal audi HatropoliiAf* lag 0ro*« 

Tao national and .Saa*aci****tt* $a£*t* Council* 

Tho Unit ad Statoa Oiyapie Trao* and Fiold Goaatlttoo for 
19«* rrapan) 

tte aamrioaa A»*t*ur -.t UaUo Union (^aouiiv* and 
Poroi^: osaaittoo mmub*r) 

Tn* Anorioan Cosmittaa for Junior . via* ta*M*gl 



wioual iuvate Uatic aioa <YIo»*ohair*n» r^e* 

P*al ^aalttoo, Vioa*ohair»An Ph/aiaal 'itnaaa 
Vloa^ohalrauMi ->ly»; •▼ol*n*Wtt Goaotlttoo) 



England Aa*t*4r Athlotio nion (ffowbor of aha xooatlv© 
QoaoUttoo, ■,..*> *r»aa Irac* and .noil Coantitto*, Vic*-«:**Lr***n 
/aloal litnoaa icoaaittoo, and Vioa«o?i*ir*< ~?»pic 
paont OoanUtt**, and also Vlca-ciialrr&an A*at* r 
olti* iiilou n »aorda Coavaltta*. 



au Stala* Ajpwad froroo* Pkf* 

m a*%4*j*j !■ aaaJ U 






M> 



uperviaor offlalat* 
» Ui tt 2k , 

Dostc , 'reater 3oe , Q¥ere # 

fin&Xa It! .It i» alga tent to not* th*t 

arpro&lraately 5*000 :;oya and -irla representing Kaeaeeh- 

sette, i'e :.*j»vi7ania, and i compel* i In tlve 

£a»t*rn Junior Olpipie finale aela nt the 7e>elty o 
*yiv*nia $t*aluK in PhiladeXpnia, ieor 

tfae referee MM ad personal ohar&e of all the 
tfeaaaoh;e*tte joun&aters* 

At rational Viaa^ohairnMi Ana the Hew inland 
$»alrs*an of the Kfttlonal Asmtc thletie alon of 

rh/sicftl rne*a f the B^pervlae** Is pl«*eeo to note 

*a*achJaefcte renteeJ aeeond in the nopeee? of U 

teicia& tho Aatt *ie*X rttnaae Teat J LA IJNk-X 



Tho Supervisor vae eleete* Aseletant Htaaafc 
aoh of the tfAXfeera tuid Marathon* re of tho si tad states 
?»pio TraeJc an-- 1*1 ?oa» in Japan, 
la Jeceabor , , *ert*or folpo appointed tho "vieor 

of rn ye teal Kttaeatlon to serve as a susKber of tae ove. .cr«» 
fhyeical Fltnesa Ooaaalttao for 19 - 

September, X9&h s ccnardttee, consisting of 30 
Physical 35d-.ioat3 a its, *r!.nci;el?* en* 

dants an«i the Supervisor, wee organised to aevelop a 

; aleaX IS ion Currle « ^rte*; 

;rsoa i2« Qfeaer the chairmanship of ^r» ^ary Woriarity, 
rrofeeeor of -duoatlon, I revet* r state College* this 

coMmlttee hopee to oowplete It aajor a- fort in the faXX 
of X' . 






As tl* pendulua swings frow one extreme to the other | 

contlauura of e aueatloual values* and vailo ergis-iance 

eontijma mm .-<*■ MMMntary eehool*a maps— ability m 
pmtmSk o,:ucatioti, aaeattoaal r.-iwu^ ion* Mi pvaperation tap 
coll©;;©, the flelJ of business end office education nuat 
continue to d* jhisU ate concern for neetinr. tbe needs of all 
student* end to ahaara la the raeponal bill ty for education in 
all these areas* 

Baal**** ami office Education in the Ooawotteeelt" of 
Heseeefcuetrtte la veil ssteblished* altfcongh in nany inatsneea 

11 development of a desirable prosrari liaa been United 
by the type and location* of olaaemosja and the lack of 
available aqulpe^nt neaeeeary for instruction. 

Km Imli was** or HmymmiMmwj t Lvltla* last bow Mm 

rrmmnm of inetr aal opport .ea for stuients of 
business and office odoaetlon. _ov© this goal* 

ss^orvlooi wmwmi la m aovliopi *& oooooxcativa sop city 

to local business educators end assisted than in proving 

:its # professional saaotlns* and conferences resulted 
la ar t .** evaluation local p>Sflffa*a 

aa a first si i tl* iiapravaw ant of inat .on. 

It Is an js e-. ucetlon will advance 

IS MM ."SCtr-a tihfcS. , : . * '■• .-.;.•.;;■ .: a*.- UJL ****• 'POO ba 

visor of Business and Office Kduoatlon, 

I— loot* iosatara tttngMMl Hm stats la as . 

elate IhO resources* com 

porvtooa Ibot m at* svailabla fop torn . 



• wo visits wo*o node* it ton wesi 

:. ~, :,; :ssc~ # 1 .'; 'lid^lcao;-:, •; *• ,!-» 1 ; 'Imput , 

wit?.: bus • i adhMMiflMBtf laps Insttt *a4s f laeoaotoa* sf 

buainaaa eduaat on riroyia* ware held daring these via it:-' t 

-inca. :. , ,• . $ ' ■ 

assistant superintendents, two ireetcre of aurric 






^ „ 

It £* anticipates that approval of tha Hagolatlona, 
at* owl Application /**oeoOuro© r*lntlnr. to 9u*inoaa 

ml ttttm l iwiUmi «;n - er mm foeattaaal iKiiiHw ktt af 

1963 will ba oo*ml*fc»d aeon ana diafcribution to thi locr 
school ae»naiea for operation aad roi*;bur»©want wi 
atartad In Saptas&o? or oarly fall «t*fl tMs w' -andar 
anaa ui ' aft a aja i il and o*rvice to tho Sualiiaaa Kduoatlort Payart- 

t ba aohoolt throughout the itta a 

roaultant iaajrrwwont In tba ourrlou).^n # instructional 
pMajMHb aaaapna«t| faacilftlai atrf ine 9 in tha amiilliaaa* 
participation In tba iualna** and Off toe araaa. 






! 



I 



bJ) 



The following: la the report of tfce of flee of 
■I lettfej . the rwport IneXudoe a roeor£ of representative 
•eti carried on by the etipervisora or .aewontary 

<t It endeavor to improve tbe eatcetlon of over 
£00,000 or-Ildren In tfeo cloaetrtary eoiiools of Haaaeehuaettfi • 

fko Off loo of <U«B»atary £dooatlo& continues to serve 
Woaooobtnotta oXenentary — luttla witb a ataff of two eqoervlso; s. 

It la lapc ie vltb two aupm i« to provide adequate 



*e~vice to ovor 1 ^laaieotary eanoole in the Coaaexafettlti . 
An ea^ponoed etaff ia beeie to iisproved eupervlsory end advisory 
Mfrti #| m ewtt m fc» a fPMtaw II to eafliwt lew or 

the H8)Q8 aoTllWJ f tr .JOpart&aent Of 



tnwjii Tiiftiit unit 

One of fcb» aadji f wn otl wpai of the TTleieonlai aeeticn is 
to visit aoiioola ma eXoooreoma. This function la being 
carried oq to ft Xis&tod degree since two mpervl aorg can 
only via It a relatively fov «obool ays tecs*, doe to llnita- 
tlom of fcliae m iff dtet&noe* 

itoXy two taiwdi 'W d eleaentery aehool visitetione 
throughout tfte Cjw ao nwoa lth by the two euperviffore 
elenentarv education for on* or mora of the pi ara w a ea 
Xlatwi aaJLowi 




Obeervo educational r^rosraaa In a* 
earaHanga between eoweanltl&e 

.38 reQuirln; stato-wide attention 

vwlweta i. eawfceaal etofwlasaaWfci in e&eaj 



f- 1 



need* in apeelfle eituationo and act in a 
oonaultatlva role 

Add etrengta to the earning progetuaa in operation 

Gain a r*>re conprehenalve pioture of elementary odueatlon 




Make presentation* on current educational tread ■ at 



?() 



(■ . | ,„. ft < 



Annuel state 

School mnelpela ana aupervlsova wae hole in April for 
ttiroe &eye at the University of tlaaaachuae fbm ike** of 

.rtlnc Our ■: • 

a aria, Jr* # :ondont of 3otiOol» # 

Worccer , 2ette„ Oevelc the them of nfero* co 

id Tile keynote ft<Mreee. o roe tor of epeefeera par tag 

is Conference include* Dp* Owen 5« *io»ai ■, 

in Kaaaaeboaatta, . ftoeje»e J* Curtin, <apoty 
>net» of gdneation, r« Jaois Idreae, , ehool 

if • aMM -, .- •"■'. ■.■■''■ , . »toa '-. Kelther, rofeaaec 

at 'uo? -. -, selee* Solle • , ;• xabaaNI #0000* rafa ae* 
• ; tie* irandele ivoaofttfj ~-. Bmjawlt- obel** 
*otor t ilaoeatary fiance , durational ftervioee 2* . 

starter, . *et Boyd, Aaalatant Sopeorinteaci-ttt, 

StoxjfeaMiUo City fcoboola. Ohio* aatf Hr # Kowasn «toolml . 
wori ^faawai Ultaatyotoy rtfeei *t.->c:.-br?a-o t MHNMlMMt 4 :*. 



Conference «ea attendee* \yy mvo than 1000 attaeetora, 
eporta froa t!*aae who attended the Conference indicate that 

.olpala :?no supervisors felt nferenea vaa 

ItJjtf&l \v a ■•. cducation-.a. Sloet Of tfce conferee* 

Mn o -o that . c ;-«.? :. c. ia nmw ea&aatieo aill 

n^partnant of uoatlon to alloc sum funae to expand the 

..• c ,. ^a^aaanaa ni fc« .:_ nreaimriam gait* ui % 

the £fctte& &&£t*e able aoeafcera to aausraaa future Conferenooa, 




She Off ioe of ilecteatary £dw»tian a*e f ae one of ita 
priaary toafce, the <luty of inferalng tba "public* about 
elgnlftesnt* educational ehen&ee* and also to indicate the 

'.....- .:; Mm iaatfal la imhmI la mMI afti Hi li 

to &e brought about. 

•The euperviaore epoke to approximately 1000 lay pc-rcona 
at WA nea : , ^11 a.*> >var 2000 adooatora In 

neetlfifte of profaaaional etodgr g»OUym tlcrou^out the 



5ia supapviacspy ataff aajcava aa gueat looturore at tl)a 

, , , i9ll f and Salaa^ either 

the Infcojustve taaSher ^reoaFOiion Fr P a ra n a or during 

■ -\ ■, ,'j.ij raparviami IM latively eeee lM**i *r. 
•f tba Bseautiaa Coarda of tha KaaaaalwHatta 

toala Aaaoel 
laora of Public , i aa 






( 



71 



of th* Mauasohuaetta AaMQlatloo for 
Currleulura avaloMMr. . 



iMfrar* or Ifeia cmcc rial** rogUnoA iUm^i 

to ka* 7 tatuMi at tba 

Itjf X«fV»l in :ory education* 

c-V Ion to eo*v© 







o oonalttuo for tha 



Wtf|*p*r.t. 'ci.^;c!.\ .;;• tit? , ..h , ?, a. r POi 

>llod parti - 
pants? f. ad dtiitoa. 



i>rograM| baa ©nda; nrcrod: to aa#t f&m noacs of tho virloua 
It lea -v; tbaa aolTo local 



.- 


ilpa, mi /or 


'•>V»1- •* ~ ',■-..«. «J 


(** "1 • x w*» j-~ ^ 


ha wore 






'. .■ 




. 


iba o;fi 




- 




. 


' • " ' * * ■** ^ ™* «* ■** 




-us tor 
Granville 


5 outbid ok 


jn 




I ' 1 . 11 * " ; 


Aandlafiol* 


£oyal£ 

/alt bm 






ffaa C i wag c 

>v of tha riTialou of 
Sduacitioo to be a part of ourva? taans and iek« 

tlooa in wovorol eotwuc 

■am vara carried on In the iowtag nn— iliittioat 



loot in tip 

Fhli 

Hoyalston 



r 






72 



V . 



Conservation education ha* beeexae one of the najor 
topics of intorect at aU levels of our ooeioty. frcaa the 
ftuioral level to tfce local I vol, nore and more people are 
upcinc that • Greater ejsjfeosls be plaoed oo the need of 
wise natural roaauree BiMM0M»nt» to quo to President 
Joftm*on 9 "our oonaervation nast bo not Just the classic 
conservation of proteetion atsa developEtcnt, but a creative 
conservation of restoration end innovation. Ita e ouoor t t 
la not with nature alone, but with tho total relation 
between ssm and tho world around hi©*" tfe* feey to this la 

Tho Massachusetts Dopartoa«t of Sdooetioa has tame 
an iaportant atria* forward in the field of eam srva tion 
education with Ita support of tho rraw student/teaoher 
aarloa entitled l . ft* first issue of ft yg&OOK , 

publish in cooperation with a private foundation, The 
Puod for the Preservation of wildlife m& Hatursi Areas, 
waa ovsffwhelrdn^ly received by tho local school syatens* 
Approxis»tal7 11*6, GOO copies wore ordered by over 600 
schools plus a nuafcor of islssoll&nsous organisations. It 
la planned to eontinue publish!; gOf* on a aera-aunwal 

basis with a aisnlf leant increase in roquosts expected . 

fbs mjority of tlie supervisor** tixos was spool In 
visitations to Softools carrying oat several fclaas of 
supervisor? responsibilities, conservation eisawtoUss 
woro given at fifteen different schools. These eaaenfellec 
varied frosa filxv'diacuasion r*eoti3G* to outdoor fiold trips . 
The srado levels covered woro one to twelve with tho 
largest ssMsbors of pupils in &**<$** six thrswfli nine. 



thro* toaohor workshops woro attondod to ssalst tr«o 
tooobors in utilising nsro conservation aatorlal within 
thair present curricula* offerings* la la an aroa that 
will rftQulro greater off ort in tho futuro and plans sro 
already underway for woro toaohor workshop*, "tvo oonfor- 
onoos woro attondod inciting tho ssajor ones for tho 
axtainlatrtstivo personnel of tbo public school systens. 

Pive sohools requested sarist*r,ee In plsnnine <*»»•• 
vatlon aroos on sohool lands or In establishing a dv ene s 
courses In conservation wit: In tho sohool system. H 
lnsroaso in this typo of sarvioa Is antlelpatod as ooro 
and noro sohool tryst ana plan fuller utilisation of sohool 
lends* The supervisor served as judge at only two science 
fairs. As aost exhibits are non-o observation o 
science fair Judgln will occupy only s ssssll portion of 
the supervisor's tiae. 



73 



A considerable amount of tin* lr :»qi2eatod of this 
of flee by verioue eoneerratior! oft^ttiiaotlona. Theae 
meetings are oore inportent to toeajp ebreeet of eiawrent 
•oaaenration activities, to avoid duplication of effort a 
by coordinating the eatlvitiee of various groupe, sad to 

d other groope and persona able to aesiet the etioejrvlso* 
in hie effort** Anoog the more laportoat group* that 
participated in thirty*eight »eet4ttr.» are* 

Meaaoefcueetta Advieor;- dttee oei Conservation 



Hiaasahiiaetta r*perteaent of natural esouroea 
Keesaehueetta Division of teheries end Oaoa 

Mas *t&c: ssssj 1 1 a ; aj§| Ipssj I c io |y 
MessMSjtasasjtttiS Conserve tl on ttm^ mnnrmmltmik 
»e*e*o&usetfca ^adoration of Spcrta^en'e Cluba 
Oounoll of Spos-taaan*a Cluba of Haaeaohueette 
Worcester Cmxt&r Extension service 
aaeriean orest ^roduete Industries 



( 



t 



4\ 



Ths Mat yosr hat oeen one of trmsasims preore e o in the 
broad field of science antf rat a arui do leaa i 

field of eolonoe and stathenst. . *st ss 

groat notional error t In oaalc roseareh has gone steadily 

:>rward f so has the Sftt sst Is lele of curriculum study 

been going forward at sn accelerated rata* Incroaain; 
great azeounts of Federal aonoy have been chennsled > these 

flei a oujb tbs .national r>cionco Foundation, the t* ig 

flee of adnestion, 00a nany otfcr Pederel sgsnolss* 
catalytic effeeta of thasa de clopsjanta arc basoning evident 
In all fields of ths cduoatio* al ente-rprlftft. fhe vorfc of 
publisher*, lnrtspetiasttt authors, sn<- local cur ion 
00 l IttSM HI Mi gWWtU y Ittffl MMii bf MMS Srltf^g 

.a Supervisor* of Soienee and HaffMmttss have endeavored 
to or I: standing of these developments 

end trends to the local conrauttT. Ths s*st obvious p?vase 

of this pr s c r sai baa bssti esaisfcinr in Interpreting ths lave 
and f orns and -neehanissw nscss^sry to esquire Pederel a! 
through TitU of t*as National Defense ueation Asi. 

While this hss been a tins c • proceaa, it hss sot 

bean ths raost Important aspect of ths <wfc v. use carried 

out in tha local eoneanitios. Hers iaportsnt is help in 

the spirit as vail as ti* letter 




Bjr nssns of both 
trstorc ana teachers bass boon aseicteu in rcvi 
of study sad in detailing ths content sod rastboda involved 
in individual courses, Specif ioslly, it is felt that ths 
ssssntisls of ths new soienes snd « rieuls 

/olve three basic tenets* the first of these .cc besn 
iSesc • /as a teaching situation 

-ftiish pemita apeo«e&ndednese of theu^it and a chsnoe for 
student discovery. Obviously, this latter must be s 

'■sa tst^s i r s^U Mo w sr y since us cc not affo sl Mm Iswvf or 

2000 ys n on the part of an indiv 

nether than telling or even denonetratin f the student is 
provided with nation w ,>wtite hte to sens to his 

mm e one lus ione an-', us hope, to open »?wtny avenues for '\itu 

• 



s ■ ss oau l sspset of this new appro? ves 
rather then notorizing. Thi*, of course, include* problen 
solving and ths use of the ssier a fsethed freed of r 
steps antf fomst« It la f-uite obvious that ths si 
atsps Whieh were salt- to be ths scientific owthod were 
actually Involved in reporting diseewery rather then arriving 
at the dlecovery* 



75 



of tha •now p 

.'iO» Of faollitlofi and equi 



■ 
^a© aro uaad mi * a**na to em Mtd. 
of equipaant vfaloh are of inter** 

Uon abould bo uaod to aaalrt In 
prooooo* &• 3 a to-* art < -ovale 

ap o!«ont to hlafe Ko way start wltSi a i 
ho will naod a abound :■■ 
watoh nay auTf la© In t 

Mai 1 1 *•*! ■ ■ Mttity atf an im 

la In anaiaar to a "fait r,ood" io i 



It! 

aaj a»i 
-. '. ■{• '•. • on-: aktlla 

oat Ion 

"yltv: £Laaa f but 
lit a 
oally h# will 

provide tiila aor© 
It I aofcad --^ 5 a*MMfaaj :.■ ~ amntatlacu At . n kuv.o ai 

the proceaa, w© a ' isoa and Ida .luacioa. E la 

not aii ©aey took to aococs i thos© «1» •• It i ~v*b a 

rethinking •»** • raatruet urine of our ontlra ourrleulu 
■:tor undoratamiln,: or our logltlautt© aina, and oortaJUJ-y 

■ •-»- '. :.. j&tlon >f aw ©Ml fef©j i aJB fee aj 



• 



It la fait that tha perapeetiv© 
a* to th* r?ev -*afc©r 
eonfaranooa In thair subject aroma an 

o >jo: •!,. f f t**1 «afida trsVOl ajtfS 

and national raaotir. ;c f ahould nak© It 
give valuablo advioa and aaaiatuno© t 
teaohore. Conal&crabX© ti**a ana e 
by tha a^parflaow In aaalatirtf. 
float Ions for now olaaaroon 
la ©Xoatr ti*at tha Xy ©\ 

$r* will ran**** 1 * rafjnoy 
faotlitloa than have boon roouirod ir 
;■■**; : -r ' • at»d|r ?■-.* t«aj M ■■' -.r 
«*h wor* floxibl© apaoo, iao 
aooarlt? provision© to pomit unir 
to woofca on:" saantha rotfa 



gained by tiat 

blloationa 
d who have tbo unlnuo 

aodanoo at rag* . 
pam r :, :r far abaai ;<> 
o *i *?tratora and 
rt Viave boon ospo: 

Urvring and apeel~ 
atan Haaiilttoti it 
om for inatruati<» 

feront rtm* ?al 



• 



i 



- 



tad pro, 
fcbaaj "or 



w ~- v wa 






ion 



■ 



Adoquato prov 
^^■r© that £*athaav 

rouv>« and that apaea 

ar^aii^p apwawa^ ai jaavH^^F h 

and oortaln: 




ual 05 '-"'croajOoa will 
ooao aotlvlty taico plaoa In 
d to bo provldod for thla 

-co oan tate plaoo In 
■na ahould bo MOdO for toaai 
■H a .• -•■■:■ : a ajNUajmatdi . 
tv^i Xa m aajan aaji 
taooo avalX&bl* to aoloiiti.. Io 
a In^ua i and unlvoraltlaa« 
it atu.ionta aliouid do 
uwt aolaotlafei ^o la Uaa \ 4 : o of fa«Ultl*a Ibot aolantloti 
■ • btiacta aro ^/c it aaraolva tfaa •' /•: Maoa a^tan 
roal and artlolclal altuatlona* 

aowmltt^ao, arohltoota* and In/- ooanlttooa voro advlaod 

of tbaao tronJa 
foollltlaa^ 






■aoa d al 

lontora eiali 



ins?, 



76 



oft Viae traveled «xt*Hftl?ol7 tic j«GJhoot tt* 
ec.so -.. 1 ayotone. red viaita u;ivs been nade* 

▼o been ae<ae in response to raquoate from 
*>aX adainietratore one teaobepe. t orn i^ve boon carried 
01 a ensure full understanding of ourront pc r agHU S l In 
sclntoe an aetheiaeties* 

the staff has continued to aaeiet tbe formal evalua- 
tion program of the How SngXend Association c .liases end 

ils on£ In anr yeye of school ojzzmma w 
DepeTlsaent of Education haf carried out at local request* 
Tbose id* evaluations in Heatucfcet* Waaler, , olbr 

At'Xeboro, Taunton and o* • 

in tnrvefi of Xeeel se&ttel pyitant in ::Lef-'ie1yi| l tit 
SouthJbrid^e, <miara»to*m t and rrovlnee 

rrtfTMiiifi! fiint iii 



I Hantue&et, 
• 



^a of the supervisors require close liaison with 
other pr clonals in the fi donee er etaatlea 

state*,] m* .ir.clv.dir. ; . #aHXa«M 4 seeesjrs sea Hf^MMrt 
groups* professional societies, and business orgeniset: 
The supervisors it a rather conaldercblo enount of v 
In t »ae activities* Attendance ipatlon c 

several ttl 1 conferences and regional, nee 

sod and reports of ti^sse rare tinea wt saada t. 
leloncr, Director, an o niaaioner of Ad ation 

inarco* These activities vara considered to bo aost 
• 



supervisory etaTf *ted actively I 

administration of thx- Heaaaefcusetta state 
Soianea Fair m& in aalanaa sen eld under ha ausnioee 

the reperuaent of duec stly with tha ftaeaaetaeet 

Institute of IM seta '» Utt MrfBJSJ -•. -It lc Corp* fl sjtj tho 
♦ i ! m*r "uarterwastor . Eadlaar sosdnars were 

sponsored ' tlonal Aor ea and Space Administration 

and tha HationaX Soianea 'eocherc Assooiat 3TA) 

o Supervisors cooperate r wit io activity, 

lemjfti tils era also at local aolanea ralre* 



Durinr. tte tins aion was vitheut a Supervise* 

, ;'<r. ?***» as deaijgtinted to mat in an 

aatfeere ubleb esns to our otta c< 

la flMaiaaialian iaBatteh a mwbor of waati^a of U>a 



77 



llMf "antion •■>* lol ImH mnj aMattM in anna* ro 

B;o liaison ldth tha . Dnrlnf in tin* t:.o 

ard mada final arrmr«n*nt* for public el Ion 

of a striae of conservation l^aflats to provide mtarlsla 
for social atu :ias and ar« insisted 

vatic • 7h« first sariae rfaalt with "»tar rsaouroas and 

d ~-ntsriAl at tha alcaentary, junior hl^b and aanlor 
:, attflaant ■■aeinHa suldo iosarta wore p? 

MWM .*ta# ?ovar tha and of tha yaar a 5upsrvi: 

Conservation Sdneation wo* ap. ad and ha haa raportsd 

tha ooaa l«afl*t# ant boon vary favorably 

rooslvad t-y tha school/ 



An asporiaantol reaaaac 
as a claaaroow taaohlOR aid In olaoant«iy and aauiwalai j 
■ahaols haa boon tod in a< aaaaobuaotta 

conrounltloa* ftp* lcfaa rdaon , who was Inn tnnaantal i 
total Of Ui ' -• . ... i NM NM ftaatgnjinl ao MaBftflnjI 
/estimator* 

a asEperi^ant, ainad at datnminin ivow a c uyat ar- 

ftidad in«r;ci.'on S*JB a* MMi |0 Info**** Hal ISaWiJBf t* 
cs and problems solution at -rasa eohool laval f 
nior hi h ac lavala, uaos a natworfc of 

■oour \ale eonnac to a h«lf«r>iili«n dollar 

■nlAm aanoM iigtl A Mqanttn li Haa 'a-^'r-c fnallttfi 
af ', -, '■'. , ■ . 8y naan* of oasily 

1 arood p**0mmm ls^suarea OalXad olson* and Toll L 
6-K-,--- in no -i f.' ran* - ^ ^t*s Randall I, in 

tha ninth £Ndt & -irton J 

ftSBool, an* adangr In Andovor# and i 

«tn*na life rtasin* mi call n*n* Mm anannjans It 
solve prabtant in a*v , , igonosa , o* 

a*n* X, :- 'i:^l..iir;cr:.,. a nnjjnp* n* thaws tlaal 




... >r nan avan play' isatnosiatlcal gsas&Sf suah ai 
vlns tha conoantar valuas for fcv*<,« or siora unknouna andi 



MUr 

I inai 



rara # prai a afl to dovalop tha appropriate 



rrnnaamnta hnva boon nada Tor stnaants in au 




coowui • . alpoio # and W 

to alao hnva mcoaaa to tha tarmlnttla on a pa. - 



Snonaorad by tha tf* S # orfios oi ndar tha 

provaoant Fvneram of the ooopara; 

Act, tha l?6 t 000 pro^rart is a nojor activity of tha 
*s aspa 




^n nan aonamla anthnni and aaotonian n« 

>rovida ths aanpntar. assiai 



78 



tfce in-cehool i* o ur e ji» a*d prov r a 

■is weeka Institute to :*> conauct©<3 in Jul/ and -Vaeuat, 196 , 
aoqua' ere from pa* at tag aohools wi 

ccK^utftp tetmlDAle, » Im&mm* And the cyetoa 
ca, Ultie; . tnataala were Xi.v tailed lti June In 

. - end la Brookllne. Sofch were active until the end of 
ee±, -ci yoar • 






joct £>lTf»B students a powerful tool llmt wil 
^locre bot xmlm nrv\ coriplex m 
rolationahlpe i it beeoe' Involved in lonf, f tedious 

Mni: tldM Itftftt night total aanf boon or ft • periods n 
p*: . rhe prograa It not Halted to mortem nati , 

mi It Hlmiif • m>aal* < and a os mt tare*** mqp o Um 

it lo aptahle to any $mrt of the tmm eurrier ■ r, $ 

l used by the average students as well »s the coolest 
loaders, ane* doe* not require any feme* 



•Bridgte* the Orede Six to 3«m 0» *tth 3oatlituaus 

t>po**a, Init lie 

ftefaool v?eeevta»nt is ettstipfciok provide in 
pragntz* *atihe»atlae for ell c o six exW 

•eve . Material has been developed etui e 1 ry setting 

has boon roviOed to develop teen end Individual ioamlnc 
utilising tfce oeooepts of te*» teoohtng end teeeher eia*. 

. llUejeji t >rovi<*4 lieit epe. 

su&aitte4 the proposal to ti*. . , < loo of r 

fcgpeeml ej Un «•*« AS - ejtftt* fclf* iejejiejMi vc ... ■ . 

Methene^loM «n> 

The Iim Annual statewide - wtthOHOftles air wee *»16 et 
MUtt lt*t* JUmmJ m Watc:. 30, i^, # ft* fail mm SO* 
sponsored by the Hasaaobusc .o Pope : l^duoetioi , 

Salem State College, end the ,.»ty oacmra Aeaoeietioft* 

Participants, selected fror. pre .i* Fairs 

in aovon ro£iorxa thscotfto^ te # :wt in thr 

lejie left OnoaaafM} %• jeete, 

i in the reir repreeenved 
Setool Rtu/lente utoo were s*egiooal fa'r Int tr-» in tj» 



Vbe ?urpoee of s «4»tlng mm 

mad eua* iin ej -«t lr >«« m2 to provide e» 

artunity hereby studen 

.er etu 



ty hereby etudente mayeuere tiwlr ^ethefiatloal 






7ii 



ftm 17 M Xeitora 1— i IHllUlfl | L b ii rco of 
. ... :..- ■ . . il |n»UM In ttfl r«MN| row -vi to heir preje 

The sixty-five Jud^ee rc*iglnc fron College rofe^aoru, 

Wan In In hietry to cleesroota teachers at 
mlar end Senior lovele f expreseed the feel ins 

that the depth and sophistication nenif sated a true love far 
end a <5eep knowledge JeeO attar, Each eoeteetant 

was erfced t ".ve o oa to five nln.it e verbal discussion 
Of t athonetiee involved in :;i© or bar particular res eoroh 
project and to answer questions 07 tho judging teesr . 

f i*<j im >k» * w^ ^ th *** *^ <h ricnentanr a****** Ifetheattttes 

Th first workshop of thla kind to be eld In Hassaehueeete 
was held at JteXan fitata 0olie$s during ti*e emsraer of 196 • 
Two acre wor&ahope of the s*«© typo are planned for tho eusxse? 
of 1 , one to be lese and the 

ether *te Collo-o. fhe objective of theae 

workshops la to train selected ©legatary mtiiera&tics leailorO 
alio mil conduct in-service **ortte]hope la t'nelr own eehool 
syetetts during the following eouool j-ear wxc/ov who will 
serve eo reference people In curricttlu» studies, 

the workofcepe are of three teeefeo duration, &ee 
hours eaoh 4m? for a total of U$ hour* of classroom inat: 
felon* ji^enfcs ere ex... jog ted to eo*£*lete both ebor*.- 

- terra aesigttsent*. The nortso' op or. t oonalata 
of ev.bjeot re , cl 

, and an overview of the rnftjor elersenfcary restberiatiee 
9 workshops are a T progren under the 

national ofenee Education loft* Certificate* ere granted to 
part --. mb* efes nnjeoetfrtlj' esjeplotee' Mm aweiMfcei . 
school system credit theae workshops toward profe tiooel 



The supervisors iiavo reviewed the aetlvltlea of the peat 
veer with the feeling that, although nosh riaoUs to he done, 
oonaidereble progress has been -ado 

Inetrictlon 1 .©no© and Mathematics In the public schools. 
;t rotors enO teachers l,*vo welceosd our 
. In the field of curriculum study, consult* 
aervloea freo the staff r^ve been requested in en in 
taeaber of instances, and auporvleore have been able to aaeiat 

pcrforoing revisions in course; of study* 
particularly noted in the junior hljfr eehool area where there 
are very raany eooourogiiig si.na of preereee* Hare superin- 
tendoate have aeiced for a. vice at an earlier atage of 

.qg for the construction of new elaaerooue end laboratory 
faeilitica* We feel hat this inprovenent in plannins will 
hove beneflelel •: eete for yoere to 



80 



ft* •fttlvttloi of tho paot ?oar novo proved very 
•tlrcaatinc ««o r«wmrdlar; to the seleneo and Mfcthtfeatlo* 



8«r*iaer» and wo ioel i; tnc 

lttC."©*B it; iy of foe 1 ve jforvtco to ta 

*ro aro oxoltin oijortgoa- on tin bo 
aiaa of ^ootly oxpantfod intoroot un 
activities* Th» etar.r voloonoo th* 
oik! ineroaalng aorvlooe to tho Xoool 
oX aoieooo mid ftttboaatlcsj but ttjer 
ur&anoy in tho pro&Lono uo fao© aa a lation today, and wo 

it 9 ouraolve* the ore can bo buolneaa oo 



Ion hoo »rovt<Ja<i 

OOOl •OUO'jllU 

on witii tho pro* 
>r our 
ct of <tx;nn<3tne 
uoola In tho arofio 
• o now ooooo of 



lo uwi 1« * ooioatiric s 

»vor:Ti«nt, »oor;on.1.^? t **isina/»s at* 
aloioao -hat osr 
on our national ooourity ao wol*:. 
of c* e« 

^oaaeoa b of o high aohool 01 

od raor* . or-ipotc* 

haa aodo It iapos « to bo ooop* 
qpfcatlzo th» wthfi c # t *e ot 



eloneo portadfti 

M ") * "A. 



* ," : I*. "■ ' 


M i8«Nfe for 


' 


aiontlate 14 A ot. 


' 


rim 




La* on It 


lOftlT 


MM . Our Ola 


) 


rat 


in 80 ic 


180 V© 




tbo t .0 isriMt 




m 8 


*nod ; 




Vlt8J iNMl 


« 



r>: -:1c 0UOOO80 

kro boon 8 

ffttwan boiDfli 
motion nowlod©8 

in oil aroaa* 

, - Onthu»tl8M81, 

8feir»»i aria* 

11 C T^ 811 f Btti 1 In 
MbM M888' * 1 O 
lofclvatlM for tno 

> OtUfiont 1: 

foaoo; 

m ;>hyclcal 

1 and 

tt8 8JM 3 *:'. I BOfti 



81 



__. . JL* 



._ 

If Judged only on the basis of financial assistance 
to the 3-ooaI eel oola, this f laeal -/oar facet be considered 
hi^ily sucooaafult A total of 1<# taodorn foreign len 
projects *.*cro recorded which included nine for elementary 
ec .oolc, %$$ for secondary schools and 3' combined, 
naxtan federal reisfciiraataenti added up to •' , 1.06 
which waa, no doubt* largely stimileted by the abopdocsjcnt 
of tit© plan of basic allotments and the absence of a 
oeilinn on nmxtemm federal reimbursement. Hash of this 
activity ; ae been etiolated beaouce of the construction 
of new plant facilities. 



At least 31 new laboratories* and cone of then in 
junior high schools, have been or will be installed aa a 
result of the planning* proeecelns. and approval of project* 
Our in : 1 . In a few eaece the laboratory represents 
a §***&& facility to eocesiodftte incroaclnc nuafeers o 
aodeam foreign language pupils cad to provide acre frequent 
practlee opportunities* In addition to she new installations, 
eleven leberot rxee were espanded to full class a ice or were 
improved by the addition of reoor&lnc facilities* Practice 
la Oecsonatrating acre and more the advantages of full 
reeordin e^ttlgcienl 



"-■• 



c addition of a third taadern foreign language 
eupcrvlfio* i.*ac led to a correspondingly high Increase in 
the taaafcer of school visits to advice and consult with 
adrtiniatr»tara f supervisors, and foreign lansuace teaohcre 
relative to the inctructional progress* the celection of 
notarial s, and the installation of equtpawnt. 

The three auncrvisore visited a total of 230 cities, 
towns and regional cohool district* for claasroon visits* 
tiona, consultations, and planning sessions. 



The Mtle III aodem foreign lengttaca supervisors .eve 
continued to lisprov* and expand their Instructional services 
to tocchcrc of nodcrn foreign language. 



Three one-week worketjope on the Inctructional and 
equipnent phases of the langnage laboratory wore condu 
in Uoburn, UetfJLeld, and Clinton in August of 190 ... 



( 



82 



tfhia jn* wltnesaet' continuation of the wry 

suecoesful tyno of workshop that wag initiated lift 
y*mr. j* besie of these workshops ere the filas of the 

or for Applied Linguistics end the Caprete f lias 
which offer new notorial* on applications of linguistics 
and Isartriitratleas of teaching* These fllwi Isave bean 

.rtaasly valuable in providing actual classroom 
tecchine for i* benefit of the olaesreeat teeoner* tap 
aXao provJU-ad an excel l--. >nt basis for discussion o: teach* 
Um, tec n . these workers ware bald In the following 

area oenteret Sprln&fleld* Leoadnetwr, Pall , 

Winchester* 



■nereliy, perhaps f the statistics reveal a alight 
downward sfeew* Whan the letcet totals ere corspared with 
those of 196;- # we observe e Aeereete of 16 # 3Uft fron the 
previous voar's total foreign language enrcllnent* nee 
the date is ineorapUto, it it *!cnlt to etate categori- 
cal!? that this indicates e trend* a fire * 
einee 19$S-£9 that total ewollaer -fee net continued to 
riee steadily. The generel , ncvertheleee* does 
net vitiate certain substantial mains in specific 



fn general fairly substantial rains wer* nede at the 
junior high levels (.Tads* 7*6) in the astern 
lanGuacea t li reflects the continuing attention given 
to earl,; ins traction in taodero foreign languages* 

Modern foreign language enrollments in secondary 
schools {7-12} durinc «*• period 19>a»:>9 to 1964-65 n 
recite e e»i» of about 97,*. alisost doubled* Fcrei^ 

rate faster than the secondary aohool population growth* 

Tf Jetiillsaf ItUf JMff?r voaaaltfeoa oq Forel^p HMUlsl 

since ite inception In 19 9-1960 tide working 
oofmittee 1ms bean of invaluable assistance to this 

vision in reossnendinea initiating ear cooperating la 
e mnber of Important sat tare relating to foreign 
learains and teaching 

One of lta noet issicrteat eon ribut lone hea been ite 
participation in the study of certification requlresmts 
and the dreftlna of reeenrjendatlone for their inprovesjent* 
Host recently it has cooperated in the develops* n* of e 
etudy working with r e pr e e entntlvee of colleges ar d 
universities in surveying tlicir pronrerte of 
preparation* 






?he study pointed 19 the need to nive r.^nUr attention 
to the preparation of tenches* of foreign languages. As 
result, a ntetevidc Conference was >*ld at Harvard Univer- 
sity on nay 7# 19&S, This was Indeed a significant kU«- 
stone in the affairs of foreign language instruction In 
tho state of Kassaebusetts* 

Conference on t flft gycpc ration of foreign Laniaiapc Tcaohorc 

Tho nain purpoes of this conference wae to stimulate tha 
tav»« vc «jm ts of progrcssa of ssodern foreign language teacher 
propagation. the Zz$ participants, the cscjtrity being 
dspartissnt heads* coordinators* supervisors and thoao 
responsible for administering foreign language j^ro^ ra aa on 
tha eloasntery, secondary, ooUa^o levels, represented a 
vide aanpllne of public awl private school r orolgn language 
instruction In tij* state. One v*rj important outeene of the 
oonf ©ronce waa tha erection of a dialogue between university 
departnent ebftlrissn and al^oantery end secondary school 
supervisors, the participants own evaluation of the pmg P S JB 1 
revealed that further conference* of this type should be 
held on an annual basic. 



Again we emphasise the need for a Center located in the 
taaediate tfroxl salty of our base of operations* 4 location 
▼cry eleee to office operations would save considerable tliae, 
provide for c better milieu for writing* and serve nor© 
adequately the neede of foreign language teach*** in the 
state* If quarters were larre enough mob centralised, cueh 
activities «e lectures, desKftietrot t ^n© and workshops would 
be conducted satisfactorily. In addition, our cecupeneTt of 
the quarters st the Heviaaxi Junior High fteaeol* Beedfisjt can 



not be continued indefinitely! first, because the voluns of 
zaatertal is rapidly growing mjA adequate storage facilities 
ON aSSlilHi MM SSjMSji, the SSjSjSj SJSJ BS SjSSjiM for SasSSSj 
purposes within a year* 



I 



c- 



84 



fhlc import opvo: a the period beginning acocnber 23, 
196; , ' ers i .-:. -Mirviror UMMM bit JMtlM < Najajaajl 

Jane 30, 196S* Duri; la aix*M©n'<- , -alx 

*\ipc>r*laory viai ta wore saede to local school ayateac . 

c su*>erviaor p* iQ Um 

program and other activities of the Hu»ionaietu ;.uaie 

; •-■•■ o I UBaOtattan M well M *tt*fttta| ftMtlaaja rou 

oonf orcnaat of otixsr related group* • She oo 

rtiacHiaaUwiaj Mtf tiftitftt&«M tf m poet ^ix out i m 

resulted in certain li%;ireaetona oon eo rn ias nuaio cduaetlon 
la tt* CoHRomiealth* :t;cee or* aunatriftta b-iaw and ere 

?c eo'aer training Institution* in wany oaaea are 
roev trine «e aouraee in raisio or mm* to 





A HUPfeer of alctaentary schools ara of faring elective* 
eeloetlve choral experience during th« school day* 

Free Instrumental instruction at tho elementary levol 
la a comon practice. 

Fev "scrinR" pgo& r aaw ere found In the ©leseot 
schools. In t v oee schools hevins "string* progreais, 
an string instrument* ara uauaHy offered one year prior to 
the introduction of wind and percussion instruments. 

There la evidence of an increase In the offering of 
acadenlc oouraaa In jauaie at the senior high school level. 
In the peat* the eotvton pr&otice wes to Unit the nualc 

cffo:-ir\; It ;>ovfovT&n. fJNNitt 

In nany schools tbsro la little vertical or horlaontal 

la due *inly to the leak of a peraon reapcnelble for the 
systewwid* :iuaic protfrusi. Hear male praejraai* at the 
aeoondary level ara being curtailed beeauae of e lack of 
ctuele facilities mi. of apaoe due to double aoaelena and 
overcrowded conditions. A large number of eeaaaunltlea atill 
are badly under* tef fed. Several eacplanationa for this 
aonditirm are advanoeds Rapid inareoee In enroll !»r.ta with* 
out c ui t aa poodln* ataff a ditionaf lack of reellatle teacher- 
pajpll ratioai tt\e practice of aehodullne perforoins troupe 
ontalde of aohool hanraf and rellanoe on outside "private" 
taejabeM for tnatet—itil titinatlwh 






PCATIOM 



Kf forte to combat the educational problems of millions 
of disadvantaged Americans ere being made ot the national, 
etate, ond local levels of government. Social and eoonomlo 
deprivation la eeen aa inhibiting many of our youth in 
attaining their maximum potential, These children are 
unable to make normal progress academically because of 
inadequate none conditions, limited cultural experiences, 
previous academic failure, and poor motivation* 

Hero in Massachusetts, the State Leglelature paaaed 
Chapter 650 of the Aota of 1964, a bill to support 
compensatory education programs. The bill states, "Before 
wo can hope to equalise educational opportunity for these 
children end youth who have become known aa •The Disadvan- 
taged, • we must, in fact, provide better than equal (or 
compensatory) services* The identification of such children 
and youth and the development of apeelal programs to enhance 
their maximum educations! growth constitute the essential 
goals of this legialatlve cnectnent." 



The legislation provides for financial reimbursement, on 
a matching baala, to communities developing approved epecial 
education programs for disadvantaged children. The set 
identifies disadvantaged children aa thoae "• • • who are 
not adequately developed by xho general educational 
programs afforded by the public schools of the Commonwealth, 
because of homo and community environmental conditions. " 
Additional criteria recommended for the ldent If lection of 
disadvantaged children Include t victim of poverty} academic 
undersohloveri limited cultural opportunities! a need for 
adequate atudy facilities, remedial services, educational 
and career information, 

MBsffl1 T ^ r "^1 iri **** Implementation of the Act 

On Pee ember 1, 196ii, an announcement letter to 
Superintendents of Schools and Chairmen of School C< 
from the Commlas loner of ducat ion Included a statement of 
the Act in full. The legislation authorises ths Lo?srtmsnt 
of -ducat ion to approve special programs fmr disadvantaged 
children In public elementary and soooncfery schools and 
permits reimbursement, on a matching baala, to cities, towns, 
end regional aohool districts for the cost of such programs. 
An appropriation of £50,000 for the flccal yeer 1965 was 
provided to Inaugurate the program. 



In order to Implement the Act, an Advisory Commission 
for Disadvantaged Children wee appointed, A Senior Supervleor 



Hii 



in Education end clerical assistant were appointed to 
e4minieter the program for the Department. 

The following edmlnistrstive •tops wore taken relttlve 
to the solicitation, review end en prove 1 of applications 
end estsblishwsnt of loool corapensstery programet 

1. All Superintendents snd Chairmen of School 
Committees wore notified of the new 
legislation end their districts were 
invited to submit to the Depertment letters 
of intent if the loosl « is t riots were 
interested In submitting on application* 
oon receipt of inquiries from 27 eohool 
districts, materials wore distributed to 
each of those oottsninltlws. 

?. The Senior Supervisor *>*rtle looted In too 
following state conferences to discuss the 
with school administrate res 
Too lls mon tary :»vdueetlon 35th Annual 
State Conference et the nivereity of 
Kassachuaetta f Amherct. 
The Forty-second annual Conference for 
Junior end Senior High School Principals, 
State College at Premlngoem. 
The Fiftieth Annual Conference for 
Superintendents of Schools, Stste 
liege at Srid&eweter. 

The Senior Supervisor aaslatod die tr iota with 
proposals end/or pro$vm refinements and 
improvements • Resource materials were 
developed and distributed to echool districts. 



km Formal appl lee t ions wore received from 11 of 
the ebove ?7 'M striate. 

5. The Applications wore individually reviewed 
and evaluated by too apartment and the 
Advisory Commission* The department waa 
often requested to obtsin certs in information 
before a deolaion could bo made regarding a 
particular project. 



6. ue amount of State aid reiueatod by the 
applying districts varied considerably with 
too programs proposed, ranging from Cl,3?9,35 
to ?12 # 019.0i;, with a asm. of :$,0?i*.07. It 
waa possible for the department to approve 
6 projecte, Tor the 19&U-1965 aohool year, 
for a total of : 29,000 to State aid. 



V 






Division of Special Musatlon 
Year ffuHng Jmm 30, 1965 



Oils ysar ths Division of Special Education enters Its second 
ads of service to end action for ths handicapped ohUdrsn of the CossKaweelth. 



Throughout the past twelve ncnths the servloee of the Division of 
Special Education have continued to expand. While the manor of Special 
Classes for Children retarded In Mental Developssmt, both Mussels sad 
Trainable, has Increased, along with ths number, scope and variety of roe* 
reatlonal programs offered during the siusasr and the root of the year f per- 
hape the outstanding area of growth during the school year, 1964»»1965, has 
been that of education at the secondary school level for these pupils in ths 
public schools of ths Commonwealth* 

The first Supervisor of Guidance, Has seen t end Fellow esp of Ken- 
tally Retarded Children joined the Division of Special Edaestion on 
1, 1964. 



As one of the Important end initial steps In this expended aepeot 
of the field, research was Instituted toward the dovolopmtnt of s curriculum 
guide* I recently the guide Is close to completion and Is awaiting finsl ap- 
proval before it is printed and distributed to the school systems. 

Visits to the school sy stems conducting high echoed claeses for 
msnislly retarded children were the next order of business* Suggestions for 
modifications and revision of existing procedures and practices wove 
whsre necessary, end in scsjs cases a totally new approach wee rec< 
A statistical workup of existing pregrasis reveeled the following t 

1* A total of fifty seven classes for high 0011001 
ags xentelly retarded children* 



2, Twenty nine hi£h schools and eighteen regional 
high school distrlots offering thsse programs* 

3* Children froas eighty three cities and towns 
being eerved by these proer-vns* 



U Twelve cltlee and towns Issi-ed diploxee to 



5* Sixteen eitlee and towns issued oertifloates 

to these children. 

6. Nine oltiee or towns are velafcimg the 



( 






88 



of diploma ft* eoepared to certificates at the 
present tine* 



A series of regional costings with 
by a toos fro* the Division consisting of Dr # C ashman, the Assistant Ci 
•lootri I*. fhilbrick, the Director of tho Division} Hiss MoKOon, tho 
crvisor of tho Dsaf | and tho Supervisor of Guidance, riaoesent sad Follow-up* 
Included In tho rrescntation vas an explanation of tho need for tho secondary 
fllnttrt and an outline of how a prograsi of this typo sight be inaugurated 
in tho local hl*fc sehools. 

A cooperative relationship has boon reached with tho Division of 
faploynent Security in tho placeaent of retarded children. An adadniotra- 
tivo bulletin fro*, that Division instructs its regional offices to cooperate 
ini 

1, Tooting m GATB - I?AT, or other non-verbal measures 
available to tho Eoploysamt service* 

2* Counseling and guidance, including Job Clinics and 
referral to otht-r agencies* 

3* Placeaent and job developnsat assistance for part 
tins Jobs while in school, and soleotivo plsoomont 
in yeraenent Jobs on completion of training* 



Km Curriculum development and asai stance - arrangiiig 
visits of students to offices to enable thee to 
see office activities and to learn hew they eight 
use the services of the office In the future* 

A eisdlar arrangement is desired with the Haoeaehuoetto Rehabili- 
tation Casmdsslon, After several soMilwgs the situation nee progressed to 
tho point where each agency will soon draw up a preliminary plan for sub- 
mission to the administrative staff for consideration and c< 



In Septonber 1965 there will be tec new high school classes opened* 
i (1) araintree. (2) Victhrop, (3) Revere. U) Falnouth. (5) Proe- 
■ (6) Amherst, (7) nridpewater - Raynhaa (2nd class), (3) T mwjscisrtow, 
(9) Msrehfleld, and (10) Saet Bridgewater. 



Sash of tho staff coahors of the Division has sede nany public ap- 
i, participating in panel discussions, professional colloquies, and 
learned symposia, as well as in a variety of general eonfereneee stropping 
the concern en the part of the CosmoHwealth for those lees fortunate of its 
children* the culmination of those publio relatione activities waa the 
Ueventh Annual Conference of the Division of Special Education, on May 10, 
1965, at the Dorothy Quinsy Suite, John Mancook Hall, 180 Berkeley Street, 
Boston* The thane of the conference wee "Special Education in a Changing 
World, " subject of an inspirational address by Dr* Philip G* Caehean, 
Assistant Concise! oner of idueation. Dr* Albert S* Levy, Coordinator of 
Special Education, ' niversity of Kentucky, movingly deeoribed "A Life Frogreji 
for the hsntally Retarded," a text which provided an excellent prolorue to 



* 






( 






the panel dlscussloni "Frograas for the Mentally Retarded," Masher* of the 
nasi included Mr. Williaa F. Irary, Sapcrvisor of Guidance, Flaeeeent and 
Follow^ of Mentally Retarded Children, Masaaohuaett* Department of Mucationj 
Mrs. Ruth Flnchaa, fecial Claae Teacher, George Bamroft School, Beaton) 
Mies Mary KcDeroott, Principal, fflosaiagrtsls Street School, Wereester| Hr. 
Gerald Patorcon, Special Class Teacher, Kussey Junior Higjh School, Lexingtonf 
and ■*. < A **mA ssvegS, Mat *Um InaVr, :.in0iftr at* IML To tfUftl 
the entiling session, Mr* Joseph Free&saa, Secretary, Special Legislative, 
Coaaission Investigating Training Facilities far Mentally Hetarded Children, 
shoved cs In brilliant detail the road which handioappsd children in Masse ■ 
dmsetts will take, "Toward A Brighter Tomorrow." 

Chairsan of the aoraing seer ion was Mrs* Ullaa A. Hall, Assistant 
of Blind and Partlnlly assise, Children. 



At the lunoheon aestiag, chaired by Mr* Anthony V* DeLeo, Supervf 
of Mentally Setardsd Children, the speaker, 23r* Janes W. Moss, Director, 
IiMarsa sad Oenonstration Branch, Division of Handicapped Children and Tooth, 
TJ* 8. Office of Education, Washington, D* C«, brought to us a stimulating up- 
to-date sinute survey of the results of research in Special Education going 
on in colleges sad universitiss across the 



fas oontinued expansion of pragrsas for the education and traininc 
of children retarded la aeatal developaent is reflected by the f ollowiag 



1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 I960 1961 196a 1963 1964 

MM m< Mai w& *<*?? iw ivfc ytffl Mil ym mm 

315 550 6*5 675 719 756 773 809 842 a** 9/5 

UiroUaent of 

6670 $393 8804 9716 10002 10766 1131? U327 11768 13053 

Total 

1954-1965 



77 
775 



5. )( ) I 



AMTOAL REPCRT 

Division of 8pec5nl Wtaeation 

Tear lading June 30 f 1965 

JgJTBBBWTT f^f-'^rtfTgP 

For nany yeare the prinary thruet of thlo Wvieion In tho 
tlon of phydoally handicapped children hoc boon directed toward tho achi* 
■out of acJdnuB integration wherever poeeiblc. Thlo ala hao boon facilitated 
recently by tho deelgn and etrueture of modern oehool bulldinge and tho gr ow 
ing awaronooo eaong public oehool teacher ■ and edninietratore that aeaenado, 
oooial and peyc? ologieal progrece for theee ehildren lo aaxialeed whom thoy 
participate In oo normal a program ao lo poeeiblc. 

However, thoro lo otlH need for the gogr cg a ted or edjueteaent typo 
of olaee* DiTing thlo poet year, another ouch elaoa hao been added to oor 
Hot, bringing to four hundred and oSarty eeven tho total number of ohlldron 
attending opoolal olaooea for jtqraiootlj handicapped ohlldron In public 
othoolc. !Iopeful3y many of thooo children will aeon Into a regular 
before their education lo completed* 



Children phyeloaHy unable to attend oehool are given bono inetruc- 
tlon lonojdintoly on roooipt by tho Bivielon of Speoial Mutation of tho phyw 
aician'e for* requesting ease. Wo continue to approve about throe theueend 
requeetc annually for ouch instruction* Tho ho ne t o oo hnol tolophone f with 
fifty percent of the oooto reiabureod to tho town by the Dejxirtaent, 
one to bo of great value la providing tho honebcund child with a ' 
uoatlon program academically and eocially* 




tlon jJ FO freao are earending both during tho 
Again, tho emphaeie lo on integration If at all 




During tho paot year, tho eupervieor boo nerved ao gooot 
panollot and eonoultant for varlouo troupe fron publio oohoolo and private 
organleationo to bring to all interootod pereone the nanlf old otorleo of 
•onioga oat indcad table oplrlt eiani ill fled dally by tho handlnepred ohlldron 
in tho Ceaooavealth* 



tho ■ ponding of Chapter 71, Section 46B of the General Lave, 
datory, hao boon on inportent factor in breadenlnc our progron* In tho 

day eehoole ao r eo ou taeo for our children at tho expense of tho Connenweelth, 
our eervloee will truly aoet tho challenge of educating all rhyeieally hand- 
enildren. 



ai 



AJJHIIAL 1(1*00 
Division of Special Mmh Uop 
Juno 30, 1965 



In retrospect, tho year has boon o buoy and highly profitable < 
.j boon many discussions in depth among paronto and oono t o a s h a rs on 
a High School for tho Doaf and methods of toaehing tho deaf. Thoao aro stim- 
ulating and provocative in tho ooaroh for tho boot education of too doaf* 



for 



A major problem and challenging one is tho need of special 
doaf children with Multiple handicaps. Many sore such children are 
to our attention and cannot be placed in existing u i c a ve as for 
doaf child. It is one of the goals of tho Division to provide 
for these various handicapped deaf children. 



for the Deaf notified this Division that new en- 
rollssnts were closed as of April 1965 and for September 1966 because it was 
operating at maximum capacity with a waiting list for fli i l ss mer 1966. All 
schools for the Deaf are presently filled. 

Graduates of the schools for the deaf who are willing to moot the 
shell ones sad are asidaml silly able are enrolled in regular hearing high 
schools. Other graduates are sent to high schools for the deaf in Vermont 
or ftev Tork. Still others with vocational abilities are referred to 

ehusetts Rehabilitation Commission for further vocational training. 



Federal Legislation continues to be of great assistance In the 
education of the deaf by providing scholarships for the training of teachers, 
granting aid for research in the field of the deaf to the universities, and 
expanding the captioned films for the deaf. In Maasactmsstts the universitiee 
affiliated with the training of tsmshori of the deaf are the Univereity of 
M assa c hu set ts, Smith College and Boston University, lbs practlsem 
are the Boston School for the Deaf in Randolph and the Clarke Sehool in 



The Assistant Commissioner received a gift of cms of the , 
by President Johnson on June 8, 19^5 in signing H.H. 7031, an Act To Pro-ride 
For The Establishment And Operation Of A Rational Teohnioal Institute For 
Iks Deaf. It is framed and on display in the Division. 



Education teem fr< 



The Supervisor of the Deaf at the requeet of the national Council 
for Accreditation of Teache r Education in Washington, D. C, 
bar of the national Council for Accreditation of Teacher Ed 
Vovsmber 15 to November 20th 1964 to evaluate the University of 
and Cretehed Mountain school for the Deaf training program for 
the deaf. The Supervisor was a member of a team from the Division of 
Men tion spooling et the Essex County Teachers Annual Convention and other 



W 



xm\m*\ Imprint ondewte ■eatlnga throughout the Coaaonvealth. on May 2 9 
1965, the Supervisor of the Deaf spoke at the dedication cCtteMv dor- 
aitory and high school at the Aoatlna School for the Deaf la Brattleboro, 



■ado to * }? t fthofl Bff and Glasses for the 
th In which Maseaabusetta children 



Supervisory visits 
deaf within and without the C 



irlncij-ola and Sux^rlntendenta of the Schools and Day Claaeee for 
the deaf oat three tieee throughout the year at the T)sjartaani of Idueatdon, 
r fai9tt| wbw«i rasssesjaewYwSf ror 
regarding problene of deaf children* 



t>:> 



DOTAL 1KHBX 

Divieion of fifeeeial Idueatlon 

lear andlng Jim 30, 1965 



During the school year 196M965, two hundred and cm blind ohi*- 
froM Haaeiabiiootto vera enrollad at Ferldns School for the Iliad in 
_rtevn, Misssghnacvte, This number includes several nev pupils vhe vara 
_Ltted this year to forking 9 —apandad program far "elov learning" blind 
children. Tvo Masaaehusetts pupile attandad the Oak Hill School of the 
Connecticut Institute for the Blind in Hartford, Connecticut. Cne Meeee* 
ehueette child attended the Reyer Qr o av c a School in Faoli, Pennsylvania, e 
achool for aantally retnrdedVfclind children. Under the reoent ■aanr1aa.it to 
Chapter 69. Section 26 of the General lava of the Cojaaonveelth, effective 
Hayitaatiw 10, 19&C, for the care and education of children who ere both nan- 
ta^ retarded and blind, t*o such children have bean placed at the Police* 



achool 



Seventy blind children (braille etudente) vera enrolled in public 
vith allied children. Reaouroe programs far blind children 
in labile aohoola in Boaton, Braintrea, Maiden and Medford* 
In several citlca and tovns, blind pupils vara enrolled in regular public 
achool (ilwaaae with braille instruction j rovided. Six braille atudenta in 
Everett, earth Seeding, Reading end Kakefield vera included in 
having the services of en itinerant teaoher for the fall of 1965. 



i the Division of Special Education, eanaory and nobilitgr 
training for blind pupdla in braintrea, Maiden, Bedford, Springfield, Lent 
neadov and Boston vaa provided by peripotologiets from the Catholic Guild 
for the Blind. A full-tine perlpatologlat, exclusively for the training of 
sohooX-ege blind children, hag been engaged by the GatheUo Guild for the 
fall of 1965. This vill enable greater nunbers of children to receive this 
valuable service paid for tor the Division of Special Bdnoation. 



In September, 1964. **•• «ilaa A. Hull joined the Division of 
Special Education as the A eel stent Supervisor of Blind end Partially-Seeing 
Children. In May, 1965, Mrs* Hull chaired the Eleventh 
a Unset 



enee on special 



end in} roved 



To discuss teehniguee for Improved library 

orraniaation of state facilities for blind oJdldren, tea? *~ ***■ w 
Assistant Supervisor of Blind and Partially-Seeing Children together vith 
the Senior library Assistant attended e sooting vith the lerssaert of 

Connecticut Services for He) aaJsi li >.rtforl f Connecticut. 



Work has 
Division's central 



on the organisation and 
for braille, large print 



inventory of thla 



94 



CQM8TAC (the Conduce on Standardisation and Accreditation of 
■« i lm for the Blind) is a group shieh hopes to isrrove services to m^ 
Individual* by proposing standards In various area* (education, library 
faelU ties, nobility training, vocational servicea, etc.) as determined \m 
tha joint efforts of ageneiee carving the blind throughout the country. The 
fepervlsor and Aedetant Supervisor of 3Und and Martially ■ seeing Children 
attended the Mar togland Rerlonsl Meeting of CCMSTAC held in Beaton in 
November { 196U Additional aeetinge will be held before this group aakee 
its final rosejSMsetlons. lice Karjorle «T. Fry* {lane to attend CGK8TAC*e 
1965 fall Meting to be held in Nov Tork City. 

In June 1965, the Scperviaor of Blind and Fertlally-fieeing CbSU 
dren attended a neeting of e*-off icio etate d s parts s ut truatoaa at the 
Aa c rJ c an Frinting House for the Blind, toulsvills, Kentucky. At thia 
■eating there was a valuable exBhenge of ideae oonoernlng the acquisition 
and nee of new naterlala (books and tangible apparatus) for blind 



to e ngnl tint the need for additional t etcher training presjsj* for 
visually handiaapped children, the Supervieor and Assistant au* t»l s <jr of 
Blind and FartialJy-Sesing Children act with faculty sJSMiem of Beaton 
university and Beaton College to dieouee the feasibility of their offering 
appropriate coureee for auch training. Both inetitutlone are giving careful 
consideration to Initiating this type of prograa* 






AKSTIAt XSPGRT 

Division of Special Education 

lear Boding June 30, 1965 

i ■ ii ■■ r ri - Tin ii ... , J • V 



During the school year 196-W965, there were twenty eeven classes 
for partially easing children in twelve citiee and tome In Massachusetts* 
The programs have followed the trend tewerde increasing integration with reg- 
ular classes, and for the meet pert, have bees coop era tive type 



Three itinerant pr ogr am s eerving partially seeing ohlldren ere new 
in operation in the Cn— uuwoalth with nine communities participating. The 
newest of these programs eervee the towna of Chelsea, Severe and Vlnthrep. 
These three ocssamitiee share the servieee of a special teacher who provides 
Materials and instruction apes 1 ea t 1 l ate for partially-seeing children. In this 
program the partiall y se e i ng child has the social advantagee of attending his 
neighborhood school, and the aoadssJci advantagee of the sax vic e s of a special 
teacher* A fourth such program, which will serve both blind and partially- 
seeing students, will be in operation in the fall* 

The masher of partially see i ng children enrolled in regular g la sses 
with the use of large print books leaned by the Division of Special Moemtion 
is now two hundred and seventy nine* Several of these children benefited 
from supplementary instruction periods, with half the cost of such instruc- 
tion reimbursed by the state. 

The Division of Speoial Education is now using, as &KD 12C, an 
fcya Report for Children with Visual Problems, a form uiLimmmidtil by the Na- 
tional Society for the Prevention of Blindness* This report, completed by 
ma ophthalosologiet or optometrist, offers comprehensive sedioal information 
sj lei it, ssssstial la astssss^aag iff o Heal si ashless! •ejessjsssjfcas^aea 
for visually frinaleasfiil children* 

The Supervioor and Assistant Supervisor of Blind and Partially* 
seeing Children served as panel membere at the Workshop on Vision held in 

June at Boston University, 



The Supervisor of Blind and Partially-Seeing Children continued her 
eond year as Massachusetts reporter for the newsletter published by the 
Council for the Education of Partially-Seeing Children. 

The Assistant Supervisor of Blind and Partially seeing Children 
as President of the Massachusetts Sight Saving Teachers' Association* 



This group adopted a new constitution in the spring of 1965, and Is now of- 



recognised as the lev England Professional Association of 
for the Visually Handicapped. The organisation will sponsor an all day 
ing for workers of the visually handicapped throughout Hew England In the 
fall of 1965* The Assistant supervisor also served as treasurer of the 
oil for the Education of the TarUally-Seaing, a division of the Council 
for U s o pt ional Children, 



96 I 
1 



lading Jono 30, 1965 





Continued aapanolan le tha kaynete if ij rapr ene far 
hearing handlonppgd flMHIpfa) fp Hit) y^sfrflSo oahoale* 
forty oitiao and town* nan offer partition or full-tiro jr ogg ano dedJai tad 
to aaetoleing owory ohild^o o«ejN*Seetl*e ablliti eo insofar *e ami rrodao- 
tion and sural reoeption 1* eonoornea* This gaooral luar o as o to nanhare of 
gregranSf nods peeaibla by th© addition of an astra apaaali and hearing Ufa** 
ol&Uot in aorlnto eonsimitlca, Tbl* tttvislaR ssasHtitly nayo tribnto to 
tho wisdom of tho onliool aasn&ttoes and sntoriotandsnts to mumntaaJar to 
tha ahildran in thoss eensualtlas tha tools *Hf taahnlomee to 
poara of children to other cities cad towns. 



More tbaa thirty ornasmitieo provided speslal Isngnaso and 
■gliding instruction poriods for hoarin|H)«ndi*epred or arhasodd ahildran 
during tha poor* Ttossnoh an tha torn *9u»*iat»handia«ppod" includes the 
alaaaiflal tamo linrfr nf ■tiocirliis*' *^> "doaf*« this asslstanso woo trerldod 

to aotioli far tho deaf up to grade eight or nine* *he erfrssadd obi ldron 
ato thoaa oho have attandad a special aohool far aphasia aMldreR far aona 
period and than antarad pt&tiJa aohoal t or thoaa whose langaafo sobers cr has 

an s ph o sod d fey cca*potaet nod5aal authority. 



At tho June nootdng tho Board of Education aj*>ointed Mr. John f. 
Murphy Supervisor of Speech Bosdiearped and Hard of Roaring Ch51dren to re- 
place Mr. Willies A. ffettbriofc, Jr. who hod hold tfco port otooo 1957. Kr. 
Jfcilbrick ouonsotsd Cr» IMlip 6* Ceehsna aa Director whan tho lattor vaa 
olof&tad to tho position of Assistant Ccaeiaaionar of ^donation on Kovenbor 
1, 196* # crowning a oaroar of atato Servian to nsndtsspssa ahildran that bo- 
i.nn alnoat thirty years ago* 

Tljflit|»*lam trhaoio uhllitfon attandad schools approved by tha De» 
vartont llNM the SSSJ*| lM S*SSS*S*tjSJ of the fNM| st fc| ontor, rofcool 
for tho Deaf, tho training progvoo) for toaohara of arhaato ahildran aatab- 
liahad at tho Beaton aohool for tho Doaf and operating vith tho aooiatanoo 
of hoaton Qnlvaraltar aohool of fidaoatlon* nan booone nationally taoan for 
tho anoaUonoa of tho tamhara c ra daatod oodor lto auorinoo. 
nato Snangoratod tho f irot olaoo for ophanto ahildran at tho 
A to fl o pt an l i i o i 1964. Tbia olana aonatitntoa an onoollcnt 
to oena to order that ohlldron with liingoana problona nay bo adoduntoly 




i)7 

I 



Division of Special Sdaeetlon 
Tear finding June 30, 1965 



During the pact year there has been a one hundred percent 
la the wtiert of smotlonally disturbed children enrolled In special 
tlon programs under the provision* of Chapter 71, Sections i£B and *6I, 
This dramatic expansion in mnnbers of children served does not Indicate any 
significant Increase la the percentage of our school population with aoder- 
ate to severe emotional Involvement, Bather, the Increase reflects s strength* 
ened effort on the part of local school officials in the diagnosis sad oval- 
nation of children In need of specialized assistance. 

As of Jane 1965, 202 children vers receiving bone Instruction, 236 
acre la special classes for emotionally disturbed, and SI were in integrated 
program* a total of 519 therefore were sharing in the benefits of public 
school progress. 



At the sane tine, 203 vere la private day schools approved by the) 
Dspartaeats of Education and Mental Health, while 367 were la private 
dentin! schools, similarly approved, both withia sad without the G< 



During the year, 65 cities and towns provided hoae instruction for 
emotionally disturbed children, an Increase of 23 ever 1964* In siailsr 
fashion, 3 special classes were organised (a total of 23) sad 65 integrated 
were structured (a total of 33)* 



The Departments of Education and Mental Health have now approved a 
total of M private schools, day or residential, or both, 2a all programs 
mentioned, the deaead for facilities and the provision of such faollitiea 
maintain a constant balance, indicating that the early estimatee of the inci- 
dence of moderate and severe emotional disturbance (0.1% to 0,3%) were well 



98 \ 



AJBTOAUKKRT 

DIYBIOH OF TKAOBR CHWIT JCaTI ON AND PLaGKHEMT 

Ttar Ending June 30, 196$ 

Statistically, the Division continued to advance* The number of 
individuals certified during the yw was 9377, an ln o r a os t of 37% over 
the previous fear* The total number of certification areas was lk,897, 
which is 10% greater than the previous /ear. Ins tables will show a swell 
increase in the number of oertif icates issued in the science©, Industrial 
arte, reading, guidance and special class whore teachers ere in short 
supply* To offset this encouraging trend there was a decrease in the num- 
ber of amthenatlos and homo economic* certificates Issued, fields in which 
teachers are needed, while there was an increase in social studies certifi- 
cates an area in which there is no apparent shortage. There was a signifi- 
cant increase in the number of certificates issued In administration caused 
probably by too realisation that requirements in this field are minimal sad 
will in all probability bo increased. 



The Professional Standards advisory Committee continued its 
studios during the year and has arrived at a consensus of opinion in favor 
of adoption of the sprroved program method of oertif ication under which 
colleges reoommend ap; lleants for oertif ication In specific fields based 
upon satisfactory completion of a p r ogram of preparation which has soon 
submitted to the Board of Education and has mot it* approval* Standards 
and criteria are still In the discussion stage but it is hoped that the 
entire certification system will be strengthened and the necessary 
by the Board during the coming year* 



waivers of oertif ioation wore issued in U*l±6 instances this year. 
almost exactly the same number as in the year before, and in almost ths 
some number for first, second and third years, nomoly 1103, 2U7 and ?6 # 
so waivers are granted for the omploymont of a non-certified teacher in 
the same school system after throe years* 

ths number of vacancies imported to the placement office was 2963, 
ID* over the lumber of vacancies reported in 1956-5?, the first year the 
vacancy lilting service became operative, this report would indicate that 
industrial arts, reading, guidance, librarian, mathematics and primary 
grades remain areas of critical shortage. The vacancy list was issued seven 
times during the year and the circulation was shout 3000 for each issue* 
The rnihsr of people actually served was considerably larger because the 
list was) regularly sent to superintendents of schools and plaewment officers 
in all the how Kwgltiwl Colleges preparing teachers as well as to others 
throughout the country who hove requested it* There were 1322 now plsoemont 
registrants during the year* 

There were 867 out-of-state residents who wore oertif led or about 
9% of the total number, a figure which has remained fairly constant. The 
nu mber of duplicate oertif icates issued was 368 for which there is a charge 
of one dollar, the only chart e made for any service of the Division* 



-2- 



The director and the supervisor mad* 2U college visitations during 
the year* The director served on three accreditation evaluation coenittees 
representing the Rational Council on Accreditation of Teacher Education 
via i ting three teacher preparation colleges in Massachusetts, He attended 
three national conferences on various phases of teacher preparation held in 
Massachusstts sad two held in Hew York. He participated in several confer- 
ences held by the Massachusetts Teachers Association en problems of the pro- 
fession end attended meetings of ths Massachusetts Council en Teacher educa- 
tion, Hen Kngland Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, 
Massachusetts Association of School Superintendents and Massachusetts 
I s ocmnar y Principals Association. He was speaker at three college assemblies, 
three graduations, two retir ement dinners, two service clubs and one national 
of state directors of certification* 



c 



100 



C«rtU|c«tM Iwued 
Cl.wlflo.tlai 1962-63 «*>&t 196U-6S 

El— Bt»ry . (nafargartan through Ondi S) 2W6 U«S7 USUS 



(Junior Hli;h -ehool) 
(Cowmnltgr Collega) 



Hiatory 



Social StudlM 
MatiwamticB 



Phyaice 

Biology 

Qanarsl ~cl 



Italian 
Latin 



OUmr Modern languages 
Subject 



Haalth and Phyeical Educate 
Subjeeta 



i nduatrlal Arte 

feeding 

Art 



Drlvar fefcieatlea 
Spaelal Claas 

Speech and Hearing Handleapped 

Daaf 



967 


1806 


176U 


538 


U65 


1136 


58 


89 


86 


780 


Ui99 


1595 


320 


586 


575 


108 


222 


236 


U6 


*\ 


Id 


197 


283 


355 


Ji56 


689 


858 


31 


30 


k9 


in 


309 


ItlO 


25 


87 


72 


U9 


90 


125 


1 


19 


20 


I 


16 


7 


59 


13U 


121 


17 


11 


11 


1 


8 


2 


205 


176 


307 


18 


6 


«3 


213 


328 


38a 


113 


247 


203 


66 


^9 


97 


3 


37 


a 


132 


16U 


227 


122 


21*0 


279 


52 


61 


91 


5 


10 


22 


70 


96 


11|6 


25 


22 


36 


• 


5 


2 



10! 

I (Continued) 



cfrpcrrislon and Administration 1*2-63 1J63-6U I36hr6$ 

Health and Physical : dueatlon 2 6 

Health 



1 



s • 



Industrial arts 

Beading 

art 

Nuaic 



Driver Education 

School Psychologist 

Guidance Counselor 

Outdance Director 

fleneral Supervisor 

Etc— taiy School Principal 

f*condary High School sad Junior 

Hi«h School Principal 2$ 157 215 

School Librarian Jl U> k) 

totals 7535 TJ£J& lE^PT 



2 


J 


s 


to 

20 


35 


s 


m 


• 


w 


• 


3 


1 


m 




i 


w 


6? 


252 


ID 


16 


7U 


t 


14 


la 


IS 


111? 


106 



KJ 



Classification 



nmir 

Positions Raportsd 

1962-63 1963-6J, 196*-*$ 




• Orads 3 
U -6 
7-8 
i<m of all grata* 



TOTAL 



Spools! Schools and Claw a 

■ f ■ III I ■ II ■ II ■ 111! I I ■■ I III 

Second ar y - (Junior and Senior High School* ) 

Nathan* ties 
History 



Chanistry 
Physics 



Oanaral Science 
Latin 



Spanish 
Other 



TOTAL 



3*7 
28 

75* 



U72 

331 

20 

TO 

70 



U96 
368 

51 

915 

109 



in? 



>ubjooto 
Business Subjects 
Physical Fducation (Mala) 
Physical Education (Female) 
feat conomics 
Industrial Arts 
Art 
Music 



Speech and Haaring 

Reeding 

Librarian 



TOTAL 



97 

8 

to 

69 

to 

50 



I 

62 

to 

106 
89 

A 

112 

121 
66 

SJ 



103 



mm Tr f-r-—) 

Toochlng Pooltiona Reported 

"•XSSZ- * a ^.^nt ^ i*gk i^ 

Bimwhny - Senior tod Junior High 

School Prinaipol At AtoiiUnt Jj6 30 UO 

ElMwotary Principal 4 AaoiiUnt U2 39 U3 

Jt -J -il 

W Tt EFf 

ORA*) TOttL 2fa52 26>6 2963 



104 



umuih nrarf 

Pivieion of Civic location 
Tmt J nding June 30, 1965 

The year ending June >0, 196$ was on« of change and challenge far the 
riviaion of Civic truncation, so well as for oil eegaeata of aooioty and all 
phaaoa of education. Though we eannot hopo to foreoaat iho future, we eon 
point to two certaintieej we can be cure that change will continue to trane- 
forai life at en ever aecolerating paoe and alee that whet mo do, or neglect 
to do, in our aehoolc will determine to a large extent the nature and quality 
of life et the turn of the century, only 35 yeare away* 

Believing thia, the THvielon of Civic Education haa aocepted the chal- 
lenge, ahared by civic oraaalsationa and the neee nedla, that Anerica neode 
better, acre effective cltlaena, and haa encouraged and aaaiated the public 
eehoola and atete eollagee in their joint of forte to develop a healthier, 

viable eoelety. The dlvlaion haa endeavored to carry out the proviaiona 
Chapter 693 of the Aete of 1951 and haa re oayhauleod the « oale established 

the dlvlaion was created— to build a cltlaenry capable of preeerving the 
nation' a heritage of gevernaamt under law* 



Thia dlvlaion bellevee that thia goal can only be achieved whan to- 
Morrow* a Isadora know how the democratic political proeeaa vorke, and why 
it worve in a particular way. It weane that our atudeate nuat underet end 
how ami meant worke at all levela, how political decialona are node, and 
how the individual affecte and la affected by the r -iticel rroceae* It 
neane having an understanding ot one'a reepenaibilitl »«j aa a citlaen— the 
reeponeibilltlaa of obeying the law, of voting, of taking part in corwenilty 
affaire and of being 1 nf oread on aattera of political, aoclal, and eeoncedo i 
importance in order to perpetuate the heritage that pro coding generationa ] 



• 



• 



• 



To carry out theae objectives, the iviaion of Civic v ducation haa 1 

a d opt e d the eervlce concept and, whenever adadnletratora, teaehera, atudenta, 
and agenciea interested in building better cltlaena have caked for aeeletanee, 
we have tried to fulfill auoh roquoate* 



Additionally, the organisation and adalniatratlon of Title 1I-B of the 
So neidc Opportunity Act of lfl6h waa entreated to tola dlvlaion. Thia re- 
quired the preparation of the State Flan and Guide line a and 'roceduree that 
would advice and aoelat local eehool eyeteawj in the preparation of project 
propoeale that would identify, reduce, and eventually eliainate illiteracy 
in the Ceeeaaaveelth. 



la Novexber, 196U, the Director net with delegate a fro* all $0 State 
If ducat lee and froa 1C tai at • 1 1 i«3 i- an i tensive Hm 
day workahop, conducted by the ". I* epart-ient of Health, Fduoation, and 
'•/elf are at the Jniverelty of Ohieego. 



>. 



101 

-2- 



ftttwehuctttt* store of the 1965 appropriation for this pro* rasi will 
amount to $380,000.00 but as of Juns 30, 1965 no money '*>mm boon allocated. 
In spite of tha laok of f unds which prevented an/ additional help, the 
neoeasary work was done, approved by tha K aaaaehueetta Board of Vacation 
on December 17, t°Al and submitted to tha ft, 3 # Office of ducat ion where 
it waa approved on February 5, 1965 • 

Plana for teacher-training workshops era in process, conferencea with 
local achool personnel are being held almost dally and we are confident 
that when schools reopen In the fall, many communities will be equipped to 
offer the bade education courses that will raise the level of education 
so thess adults will be able to obtain and retain wore productive or profit* 
able employment, and better meet their adult responsibilities* 

Aftsr 12 years in very inadequate quarters, the division moved to the 
second floor where additional space will allow ua to work more effectively 
and efficiently towarda the achievement of our objectives. 

The major work of the Piviaioo of r ivic Education can beat be reported 
oncer the headings of Frofrasaa for students, Yograaa for Teachera, Special 
Services, Special Activities, Adult Civic 'ducat ion and einee 1965, Adult 
Basic Education, which are suasBcrised below i 



I ___ 

A* student Gove rnm e n t rmy 

This prorram conducted in accordance with Chapter 650 of the 
Aota of 1951, saw M*6 delegates from public, parochial, and pri- 
vate independent aehoola participating in rtudent Governm e nt Pay 
on April 2, 1965* 



assignments were determined by the "Glass Bowl Drawing" 
held in the offlee of the Governor on January 15, 1965. 

ht "Visiting Days* were held at the State House, In advance 
of -tudent Government Tey, to prepare the delegates for their roles. 
The Interest in and support of this program by the Constitutional 
Officers, the m em b e rs of the General Court, and the many state 
officiala whose cooperation and asslstanoe helped to make the ;ro- 
gram a rich educational experience, were Tost gratifying^ 



- 






10K 



-3- 



The visiting days for tha 1?65 pregra* werei 



January 26 


iigUi 


I 


Suffolk County 


February 2 


Region 


II 


Eeeex County 


February 9 


igUi 


III 


Morfolk County 


February 1/ 


-■ -i • ■ 


H 


Barna table, rrlatol, Duke a, 
Kantucket, and lyaouth 
Counties 


ebruary 23 


\~ |m 


9 


-ore ©star County 


Juwrch 2 


i ^ion 


VI 


Berkshire, Franklin , 
Hampden, and Hampchlre 

ounties 


I *rcn ? 


Region 


VII 


fciddlaeex A (Representative 
Dlatrieta 1-1?) 


? arch X6 


Ration 


I 


idilaaax B (Repreaentative 
Metricte l*-35) 



Student novemment Pay was hold on Friday, April 2, 1965* 
Tha inaugural ceremony wee televised "live* and financed by 
wUD8-?V, WK-TV, and VaaCTV in Boston, Wv-lt-TV in Springfield, 
HRL~-TV in reenfield, and wTBV-TV in *ew Bedford. 

Thia division la Meat grateful to these atatlone for providing 
thia educational highlight at o coat to tha Commonwealth. Ve are 
alee grateful for tha financial support of the £aaaecbueotta Teachers • 
Association, which sponsored the student luncheon, and the raeeachu- 
aetta Civic League, which aselsted in conducting the program and in 
underwriting the coat of vital teaching aaterials. 

P. Student Government Fvchange Program 

Thia pro; Tea ia declined to enrich students 1 knowledge of town 
and olty government, to encourage pride in their local oorwunitiee 
and to b r oa den their underetandinf? of local and metropolitan pro- 



1 

: 

7 



Daring the 196h-196£ aefaoel year, one hundred and six high 
schoola participated. A n recognition of outstanding programe 
the Cltisenahlp ^oinmlttee of tha ♦ aseechusetta Secondary School 
"rineipala 1 Association awarded citations to the following high 
schools t 



Worcester Classical 
Waltham Vocational 



ennis-Tarmouth fteglonel 
Brain tree 
Bar thampton 

atajptMl 
Acton-^oxborough Regional 



1( 



-li- 

G. Citisenehip-in-Action Frtpw 

This voluntary profits is eondoeted cooperatively with tha 
Meesachusetts Secondary School Frinolpals* Association to 
social service by pupils throughout tho Conssonwealth* The Cltlsen- 
•hip Coesilttee of tho Massachusetts ffeoondary Sohool Principal* • 
Assoc lotion acrcana tho reports subsdtted by tho principals and 
thia yoar voted to give special awards for eueh services, under a 
rrant frou tho :*ars-£©*buek foundation. 

tho Division of Civic Education organises and d tracts this prograa 
and tho Director and ^upervisore prooont tho awards to thoao schools 
soloctod as deserving of apaolal recognition* Tho following high 
schools received cltaticna for outstanding ooaaatnlty sorvicos In 1961- 
1965i 

eeweuryport 

Walt has 

St. Qjarlee - Weltha» 

St* Mary* s - althan 

Chaxlastown 

Glouoostar 

icoln-'udbury Regional 
rauline - Sprint field 
"t. Anthony* a - Flew Bedford 
Trade High School for Girle - Boston 

D« Hssseohuaette Youth Cltlsenohlp Conferences 

This division, in cooperation with the State Colleges at Boo ton, 
Bric^owator, Fitchburp, Salem, and Westfleld, annually sponsors a j 

series of hlfh school conferences on a significant topic relating 
to civio responsibility, rhese conferences take tho font of "< rass ) 
mots 1 ' sessions for large numbers of students drawn fro* tho geo- 
graphical region around each of the participating state colleges* 
These intrastate Meetings represent a preliminary atop to too North- 
east Regional Youth Citlsenship Conference for selected schools fron 
New England, Mew York, How Jersey, and Pennsylvania which la held In 
Jane at Tofte taiversity. 



The sane baale thessj and conference etructure is need In the 
lotraatata and lnteratato sessions. The 1965 thewte was "The Public 
Service. " Rationally known spookero were featured in the ; ro rams, 
which also nrovlood for pupil discussion, in swell groups, Moderated 
by students from our state colleges* 

Tha 196$ Massachusetts neetinps were eefepletelj se If -eup porting 
aa each school paid a registration fee of five dollars and eech 
participant aid for hie own weal. A total of 1,335 people partici- 
pated In the five conferencee. Attending were 1,001 pupils and lLh 



I 



' 



108 



teacher* fro* 110 high schools, tad 15 faculty w snbs r e and 109 
studente from the five apeoeoring state college*. 

Hotei Complete progran (totalis are available is thl* office, 

f,. northeastern .'tates Xouth Citisanship Conference 

fhe Division of Clvlt) Education contributed to the basic planning 
of thl* Interstate conference eponeored by the Cowniea loner* of lda> 
cation of tha Northeastern State* (Hew England, sew York, Nov Jersey, 
and Pennsylvania) and their service affiliate, the Lincoln Kilene 
"enter P*V <*itizenship and Publie affairs. 



fhe aonfarenee f neat providee that ninety "taaaw," each 
elstlng of an eleventh grade girl and an eleventh grade boy, and 
a faculty advisor, from ten secondary aohoole in each of tha nine 
states, participate in this aonfarenee. 

A grant frow tha Scar s- T *eebuck Foundation made it possible to 
pre sent outstanding authorities on the these "The Public Service." 
roup discussions **f Moderated by college students who had par- 
ticipated in o ir intrastate conferences on tha sane then*. 



The following Naesaehusette high school* were represented at 
tha 196$ conference i 

Aim Academy, $*elburne Fall* 

Belllnghsj* 

Blllcrlce 

cathedral, Springfield 
..-* vdimm cntr.-l, '•■ :<cx.rd 
Girls*, Hoxbury 
Saverhlll 

Bit "egional, Orleans 
Thompson Academy, Thonnson Island 
WUllana, Stockbridge 
Winchester 

P. Massachusetts Heritage Say 

*• yanaachosatts Heritage Par nrogran was instituted in October 
of 1961 to drenatiso for adolescents of Junior hig h school age the 
very 1* ortant part this Csa s as mieal th haa piayeTin the developnan 



af danoaracy and to enhance their understanding and appreciation of 
Anericen ideas and ideals. The fourth annual » crlta&e ay was held 
at Flynottth on October 2L, 196? i under the Joint *ponaor*hlp of tha 
division of Civlo rducation, tha Kaasaehuaette TSmr Aaaoclatlon, 
Plinoth Plantation, the Kaeaachusette Junior igh School Principal** 
A**oci*tion, and the Mi coin : llene Center far Cltisenahip and Public 
Affair* of Tuft* niverslty. Tha prograai expenses were underwritten 
by the John Hancock Putual Life Insurance Coapany. 



J.05J 



Student and fiicult representative a from two hundred Junior 
High Schools heard the inspiring address "lou and lour Politico, 
life" deHvered by *r. Krwin Canham, toured the J?ayflower □ a.*d 

;*oth Plantation, an* participated in group dieeueeiooe moderated 
by students from the State College at Bridgewater. 

n. The at S. Senate Tonth Tregrem 

la 1962 the Commissioner of Education accepted an invitation to 
have Faesacha setts participate la the '-'• 3. Senate loath Program to 
be held in Washington, D. C., during the laat week of January each 
year* Sponsored by the illiaa Handolph Hearet Foundation in co- 
operation with the United Statea Senate, the program a continuing 
one, la designed to give young Americana of high school age knowledge 
of American political life, 

it ivtftM of BtSVftg 'ocptii-n mwi boen MlmAcm 1 wit Mel 
mechanlce for, and the supervision of, the selection of the two 
students from > aesachueette who participate in the program. The 
selection is carried out in conjunction with the < aesaehusette 
Student Gov er nm en t Dear Program. On fwee mbs r U, l°©li, the namea 
of Scett Leonard from «*eetover air Force ^ase and I aureen Buckley 
from Dorchester were drawn in a class bowl ceremony held in the 
office of the "o rrlaaioner of Education, l 

During their atay in Washington the delegates visited both houaea 
of Congress, the Supreme Court, the State and Defense Depertrcnte, l 
and the White House, where they were received by President and Pre. " 
Johnson. They also served as interna in the offices of thoir re* 
sportive senators and had the opportunity to talk with outstanding * 
admiaiatrative, legislative, and judicial leadere. 



II 






1 

The Division of Civic Education, in c o op er ation with the 9 on sol 
Bureau of the United Community Services of Greater Beaton, has for 
several years promoted school asemmrilty service activities by second* 
ary school and area college students. During the 1961,-1965 school 
year approximately 5,500 young adults from 365 puMic, parochial, 
and private secondary achoola and 32 oolleges wexe engaged la pro- 
gram* popularly known aa "Operation Kindness." vith help 3 
107 heolth and welfare agencies were able to offer extended cervioes 
in "Bed Feather" boenitala, cettleeent houses, homes for the arcd, 
end day camps* 



- 



{} 



-7- 

111 ****»» ro* Tucarg»| 

A* Continuing Studies Courses 

1. Institute on Youth Problems) 

A lories of programs showing how elemsntary and secondary 
teachers and administrators can work effectively with eosssoDity 
agencies ixs the development of battar civic behavior in children 
and youth* distinguished representatives of religious faitha, 
juvenile courts, police. medlcii;*, social welfare, and inter- 
group agencies wore guest lecturers. Institutes were held att 

Brldgewater State College, rail 1961 

— Or, William J. Raid 

Boston State College, inter 1965 

— ft. Willie* J, Held 

?» Civic Behavior - Democracy^ Teat 

A course designed to enable all teachers and school officials 
to educate for democracy with a clearer, stronger purpose. 

Brldgewater State College, Fall 19th 
—Lawre nce fc* ieogiovanni 
Fitchburg rtate Collace, Fall 196* 
—Dr. John E. , Loughlin 

3. workshop in Adult Civic Education 

This is a prerequisite for certification by the *aesachu- 
setta "apartment of Fducation to teach state-aided classes in 
Adult Civic Kducation and was held att 

Beaton State College, rail 196lj 
v all Kiver, 'inter 1965 

■ sttat Kargsret *. Kielty 

B. ttodergraduate Courses 

tudy fuldes, receewended bibliograrhies, resource materials, 
and gms*t. lect'irers were msde available to undergraduate courses 
in Education for CitisensMp** at Boston, Brldgewater, and 3alen 
^tate rollsgee during the 1961-196$ school year. 

C. Teachers 1 "lsiting Day 

A very rewarding service, provided by thin division, saw 169 
teachers from 66 school systems devoting a mid-winter vacation 
day participating in the sixth annual Teachers » Visiting Day en 



ill 



■ lasisajr, February 2U, 1961u The program included special talks by 
the ^resiient of the anate, til* Speaker ef the Room, the Chairman 
of the Joint Committee on r dueatioe, attaodanos at camm ittaa hearings, 
and legislative sessions of both houses and a meeting with tha Governor. 

Isaeators' feanemle Iducation Seminars 

Tha Piviaien of Civic Education haa worked with tho law rngiand 
MMtl iMMMM ouf.cll N iMVNea economic Interest Mi M >•'- 
teney In tha schools of tha Cejenonwealth. Tha ma.lor area of co- 
operation during 1961t-196$ una In planning tha Teacher* 1 Seminars 
hald at "oaton College on January 19, Mann t}» and tha Junior 
an ray 8, 196$ # 



17 3PKCIAI 9HRTXCSS OP THE PIVI3IQ* 

Many boards, eewnisstons, service clubs, and professional organisa- 
tions and assentations have eallad upon this division as consultant 
sad architect whan planning and implementing programs In which there 
are eeenon Interests* 



A. Xeseaehusette Congress of Parents and Teachers 

As Cltlsenship Chairman, the Director conducted the state wide 
District Cltlsenship Awards Tregram, moderated or participated la 
panel discussions at the aid-winter conference, the annual conven- 
tion. Presidents • Bay, and several district conferences. She also 
accepted neny Invitations to speek and advise units regarding oitisen- 

*,**. I 

P. Cemmenweelth Service Corps 

■ 

As the Cemmlesloncr'e Dcslgncs on the Cceawjnwealth Service Cwrfm* 
Advisory Committee, the r irector attended meetings of this orrunisa- 
tlon whioh served as tha state agency Inplaaantlng tha conoaic Opper- 
tanlty Act of \96l, Such meetings ware held on the third Tuesday of 
cash nenth frea ffaveajber, 196U - June, 1965. 

. Governor's Cesaileslon on the "tatue of 'onsn 

I 

Again as the Mantle eiooer's eslgnee en the Oaveraor , i Consdssloa 
on tha status of tismea, the irector waa assigned to Area V, tha 
Culturally deprived *mea. In this eepaclty she waa in a position 
to s ee ui e aenaultent services In this sensitive area. Tha eight 
aub.co j e d ttoc and full cocnlasiaa meetings hald during the year 
will, it is hoped, enable the Commission to reeseavjad legislation, fa 

which will strengthen the status of woman la the Oaasjsawaalth, to 
the neat eeeelon of tha legislature. 

■ 
ft* Assistance to I grants and Their "amiliee 



1) 



-■- 



The Vine tor helped to set up tht ducat Ion "to ram conducted by 
the ramma. in i il tli ervice Corp* under Title II, Ptrt B ef the conomle 
Opportunity Act and served on the Advisory Committee for Its imple- 
msntetlon and evaluation, 

% m Adult Civic dueation 

In accordance with Chapter 69, General Lews, rectiona 9, 9a, and 
10, Instruction in the use of 'English for adult* eighteen years of 
age or older unable to speak, road, or write the earn, and in the 

principles of Government and ether subjects, idaytatl to 
then for American eltlaesehip la directed by the Division of 
Civic education. ~tate-aided elassea were conducted in 56 cities and 
towns with an enrollment of 5,2^6 students. These a Q— initios 
reimbursed fifty p*r sent of the cost of instruction in the 
of $U»,«6l.Q0. 

i 
In addition to preparing teachers to instruct the foreign born, 
li division eolleete statistics for the • % Department of Justice, 
' lvision of I Migration and Naturalisation, recesses requests for 
rolmbu rs s m snt, conducts an annual conference for supervisors and 
teaehere, and, as far as budget and staff liadtationa permit, visit 
classes and participate in special prograne, 

F. Adult «asic Education 



In Sovember, 196!?, the Director was assigned to neet with delegates 
froaj the other states and certain target el t lea in a three day eon- 
feresjee at the diversity of Chicago, This Departmnt ef Health, Kdaee- 
tieo, sad Welfare "onferKnce was held to plan sruidelines and precedurea 
which, it is hoped, will reduce, and ultimately eliminate illiteracy 
throughout the country* 

ince that time, the staff of the Division of Civic education haa 
devoted its time, effort, and talent to setting up a workable program 
in ) aasachuaette* This included preparation of explanatory materials, 
guidelines, a ~tate Flan, teaehor-tralnlng workshops, and a tentative 
budget, pandit* allocation of federal funds* 

Three candidates were recruited who wi.11 attend a two weeka' in- 
tensive training at the 'niveralty of Maryland this summer, after 
which they will conduct institutes at the "aeeaohueetta state Colleges. 



• Maa saehe eette Teaehere 1 Aeeoclatlon 



The nirector haa served aa member of the Citizenship Comnittee 
ef the Kassaehueetta Teachers* Association in which capacity aha 
has been privileged to participate in the state-vide and are? 
'•rene of the Association. 



1 i '*> 



I # h-K Clubs 

The contributions of the vision of civic Sduoetloo to too 
itlsenshlp Prograa of the ~t*te k-H Club frogran over the post 
several years was recognised by o srcctal el tot ion awarded to 
tho Director ot tho annuel Fall forun mt the flotol K< 
Ootobor 3, l°6lu 

▼ *TWUL Acnrniss or ?HK Dnrxsioi 



July 1, 1*61, and June 30, 1965, tho Director and the two 
Supervisors In tho Division of Civic Education accepted tho following 
invitations at opportunities to pronote eivle education! 

A. Asseably Talk* to Students 



iMtamsj* Baf* October 2 

Charleetown High ctober 6 I 

Rest Boston October 6 

Holy Bans of Jeius, Worcester Ootobor 8 

aa r owsbmy 8igh October 3 

How Bedford Vocational October 8 

Karla Aasumpta Academy, retersha* Ootobor 9 

'urdeck High, tftncnendon October 9 l 

B o n ns lp a High October 16 

Auburn high October 20 

Bolllston High October 20 l 

Marion Sigh, Frnminehan October 20 J 

St. Joseph High, I*w*ll October 23 

Gate of Heaven High, South Boston Ootobor 23 y 

Brockton High WsvssJbsr 1/ 

Weymouth High Deeeatber J 

Bp Special rregrasi Participation 

Bow England Conference on Adult rducstioa ^epteaber 25 

Bristol County Teachers 1 Convention October 1JU 

Row England Area History Conference - nsgla October 17 

Revere Voosm's Club October 21 

l—x County Teachers* Convention October 21 

Norfolk County Teachers' Convention Ostober 30 

fall Csnfsrenoo for Adult civic Education Teachers wsvssnsr 7 

Massachusetts Comlttee on Children and Youth ovonber 21 
Rational Council for tho Social Studies - St. Louis Novenber 

Conference for new Superintendents - Fraalngham Jeoenber I 

International feachore* 'rientatlon January h 

National Conference of Christiana and Jews January 12 
Massachusetts ocondary School rlncipals 

Association m Tudbury January 29 

Professional Conference - *rid/«watar Ksbruary 3 









I 






114 



-li- 



Hational Conference of Christians ami Jews February 3 

International Teachers* Valuation February 12 

Cambridge Women's Republican Club ebruary 15 

tOth Oesjtajy Ci titans Conference - Bedford : area 

Beaton's Business and Professional 'omen's Club arch 6 

Km As Aaarican Right - 9pringfield March 16 

Vev Fngland Adult Education Association Karen Id 

!*oston "tudent "xchange "<rcups March 22 I 79 

Flks Student Government ray - Chelsea March 21* 

Tufts Assembly on State Hmsr— out Kerch 30 & 31 

Boston Credit Women's Club April 8 

Hockaaock League April 9 

Worcester Exchange Progran April 12 
Kassachusetts Plamentary ^Tinelpals* Conference - 

Amherst April 12 
Cltitenshlp Teacher Training Institute - 

fall Mirer April XU 
J ass&chusetts Secondary School Principals ' 

Conference - ^awlnghaji April 21 
Massachusetts Suporirt-ndentc conference - 

Bridgewater April 21 

itopoYslmttti immrtaMm of Msec! tatetM 

Kanegerc - Auburn Kay U 

Klwenls Citizenship Ttecofnition - balden Hay 6 m 

Berkshire Principals • Association - Korth Ideas Fay 13 1 
special Coasdaslon to prepare plans for the 

Bicentennial of the Revolutionary Var May 25 and June 29 

its Youtr Citiienship reference m Tufts June 2,3* & I 

iris* State - Bridfcwater June 16 i 

Adult Education raduatlon - fall Hiver June 17 3 

fictional Ttefense Education Act and National Council 2 

for the Social Studies Conference - Washiiurton June 21-25 



1 

: 



• ansret ■« Oaaran 
Director of Civic dacation 



1 



i 



1 



for ihs YBttt anio jot* so* 1945 



30, 19*5, tbo Oiviaioo Of Xauii.,ratioO and 
48 yoa*a of total ooxvieo, ooo 1 44 yim as a part of 
of noooottow fairiblUbon 1* 1917 ae tlM 
id mnualfim aa an Individual offica. %dtb tl 
Onto) 00* tbo OOOOOtt of XOOOOtfOt&OO 000000 tOO 
fiat ill I at too JMKS AaOOiffaOai at tflfl til til tba 4 




w^ 9vAvwWB £ wa^p 0j^a%V-OOaPa»OiF0a w^P li*P^W O^O^bl 1^^ ^^^^P*^^^ 

oltfc UiriiiiiU iiijpotut uLll too* toi 



1. Bring into ayopotbotio Mi 

rtI>ttom the COanoawoaltft and ito 



3» StloolatO toaiff OOcgRiaXtiot) MK? OaOtOSy of nOollabf 



i wat i fait ifnn> and idooloi 
S* Gontrally atooota tboijf itilof lit Itm wd 



too *Mifllwil fbiroau of ToorlQinit lifn mi aboliabod la 1919 
and ito fonctiooa and datlaa tranofon o d to too Dayton 1 of educa- 
tion, too oosk ooo arjiotooi oo too crtvitioo of loY&eratioo and 
AnnsiannAaaalaa aaaaar tba Gaaaiinalanair of BdhaantiOn altb a Blnaenaw 
and oo a o Vin a gy Board of ai* povoono. to 1905, too pooitioo of 

too nia ot ra t T iii o n of Elocution otth a oiroctor and oo AoViooty 



too aiviaion ookioo it too only niWatao in too 

oMoo io tdtooot a Dioootoo. Otao t Of 409 poooiooot 

"that too nana of too Adviouoy ooood bo •■miful to too Board of 

^►•^a^a^^p^^^a ^a> ai ^^^•a oono^O> *^OOBO Otji^OOOi^t^OOn^oa a»i»oaa> woanjp aa^a^naav^a oyaoOBV^O V^^OiPOO w ^^oa 

f oO tbioo yoara by too Govaroav oitb too adaioo and ooooooO of too 
Council, Too droit urn aboil rb)atpo>tt ooo of too ooobooo ao too 
Coitmaoi Tbo ooa od aoall noot at loaot oooo o nootfc at ooob tioo 
aa it any by colo ontoxoino and aboo ■oooonnl by any aaobar tboroof 
Tbo ooOl m t of tbo Board oball rocoivo no aanpanaHtna f oo thai* 



• 



ii 



: 



; 



L16 I 



Tot Board of Xaaioratioa tad Aat rlrairt ir at t*ra hat 
ti-W> txroujh tfca ytara cuxl tha ;iviaiuii jivau tlx» juiJ-mce 



Kith tht ft— fit of Cbavtar 573 in Jant, 19*3* at ta 

tf tht "a ^Ogf tf tat Atatial Coaaiaaina haadad tar ttn 
tht hoard of Saaloratioa tad iltaf total *ttlna It tboXithtd and 1% 
taw hoard o* Higfat* tdaottlot with tht pravitioa of tha 

1— lutatlo tad fHwtitat— ttin la tht 
it 



Tht Oitition ituajtltrt 4Sl # **0 ttrviett for tht pant ratr i» itt 

oifiettf Bit**, 4S # nX*| Fail Rivtr, 4,X73i !■ iitn, » f tt8| 

hprinafitld, SfifTf tad M t tt tt ttr , 5,333 at tht ohartt aapandtd to 



t^fc WW a^ta^ta WMIm|h& Aantap tjaapi fard»Ba> tpat "htjp •^»^P f apto* apatha tP araak w^aVtV ttwt a^dana* 

ltrattt ovam> it Italian - 5*7X2 of thoa 3 # t07 tort ttrvtd in 

that 5 f 0tl fitwftflian fount 4»*X3 hnra in tht United ?tatat* 3 t t?X tot 

• W# t'*m^H^W tP©t^^W^W^ BWa-nPaPa ^•^M^MMVy •^th^^^^tw • "'rtl*^t»I wA WJV I^VtW «BBBt ^B>*t a^^tatBhBPjt *J 

X f 775 for p t ttow horn in Gratetf X 9 40S for Gtrwm horn rttidtntti 

aV a ta^tt ¥ BBraJWap-na afaa a^BBB^ r "BB'aaapBMt y w W ah aattp *J*ta*aBaataa WNM «anBFaa^B* •^aWa ^tBB^a ^a^BpaBBtP'ap aBBja» ayaaajataaBaBaa aa 

tint aaatd at tht chart thant* Tht Italians and rtatiftint racord 
Ur n— t ■man* of faamLtinaan in tht osaaonaatith aad« aataaalXv. 

^•^^^P^P Hw^P ^» ^^^^^^^^^^^^^BB^^W ^^^^^w ^^^F^^^BB^^^^^^P ^P ^^^B^^^BP^^^^^p» ^^W B^P^^PB^f ^^B^BPfl^BBl^^^^^^^B^^^^^^^^^^^F p^^^^P ^^^^^^P^^P^B ^^^^Bi^^^PBa^^^Pa^^^^^^^^^a H) 

haaja aho D&nfclnan of fajaiXv MMniaaa* anltiataahia nnaXicatiaan* 

Tht Qihtat tro a lairflt portion of thttt 

applying far thtagt of atatat to ptrmonant toidtnttt Matt 

art tattatlao docaaaatt f tt f aaiXy rataioat via iBirttt tad 

atrriad to aitiaana of tht ihtitad Stataa, tart tttitttd ia atttiat 
a cttord tf paaiaaaaait tntxy into tht Uaitad Stataa tad that bt 
aattraXittdp Mara of %h% ^r^ ith aataiata tap&iatata aha had atat to 
tht Itil ltd jptatat oa taanaaanr ttatat to vial tart or ttaaantt. wart 
aidtd ia topXiottiont to batoat t ptn n t ntnt ratidtott of tha Qoittd 
Tht ittlttat of tht Uaitad Statat art ant of tat iaroar 
tad thay raptatant not oaiy thaat tha tart horn ia tha Qhitod 
tad hart at t ar laft itt tborat and aoa opoatoring ralatitaa* 
9 hat aany of tha aartoat torn ia tht Uaitad Statot hod livtd 
r yaartw aoa # iwaing atrriad tad rtt tr tt d to tht 
ttrro t t ti t t td in aatcution tf ar o o od or t t far ftaily 
Of thia tuai. aany ooat f i 





Hfrf •■»■** jfrrr 



our caff lot! art ntlirt itnt<1. nX 
tad aitr of tha Oiai ■ ulth ia 



117 






Tl« looallti** la ord«r of 




10. 



Fall 3W»r 



3,373 

2,373 
i. 

1,434 

1,145 




♦^PlP0%*l^%P 



in tots 8tat« of 



10, 



122, 



ft* 

2. Italy 

3. tttM 

4* 

lb 

4. 

?• U.S.S.B. 

«• Cube 

ww *^^P ^4#ipa> a>44#^a^R9 

10* 
11# 

la* mnipp<— 



• IO, 317 

• 3,333 

• 4,373 

- 5,19* 

- 1.834 

• 1,307 

• 1 # < 






lp Mm 



with 



l. 

ft* 

3. 



Veen 



x, m a 

€o575b 





3. 

4* Florida 
7. 



137,734 
174. aw 
173,219 

133,000 
131,210 



131,< 



123,4 

133,533 
33,437 
73,473 



10,300 
14,701 
14,410 
74,457 



4. 



2 
1 

3 

2 



2 

1 

1 






11 1 



tt* 1M0 



lists 3 9 140 9 31? 



is dsf iasd by tfc* 
tnrmlyt feists sud sativs* soxa *» i««sigs) 



Ut. 

rssio is 



ft.149.A7 



••••••«••• •4 9 S72 9 Ss£ • 

• • • .3,0*1,004 - 40ft 
• • +l 9 4tfl 9 S&? - 



iiililltlMill •?*78 9 453 • 11«< 



la 

tots! sssnlallsn of ths St*ts, Tss 

of *—<*»*— Am? shin 1a mi tfS&lSMSa 



2 9 Oft8 9 30» OS 40* 



«J^euS«vwBBwm9bHbRrK 



Xtsl> 



rorfwgsl 



^'IST IhJJNBMI 



All OSB0* 



fiH»/ 9 «*3i 

3U 9 0i* 
£5 6*146 
**»,*& 

♦•^ 9 ^^^» 
45,328 
34 9 748 
51 1 101 

40 9 *n 

40,4/4 
34*00? 
ltf 9 0J0 
18,708 

it,oss 

16,<flM 
13,UM 
U,7«0 

10 9 ^a 










4,«*W 



l.MS 

STOCK 2 9 0ftS 9 3O9 



\ 



119 



QT thm 393,249 

ymx 1964, 12,030 



1—1 Mil 

stay 



mum to MaiiMtm—tH •• 
eounrtr ioo of births 



tool* fir ot 



•ST 
S3* 

3T7 



P.9.9WR. 



190 
75 
73 




All 09*9* 3* 

la too 1m* too yoaro, 113,945 inaigraoto mm to 

IMS * 9,917 
1*9* - 11,743 
19*7 • 11,3*0 
1958 • 10.12* 

vm - 9 f ass 

o»9*tPO^ OOB WPw 

1901 - 12,091 
19*3 - 11,579 

1993 - 13,371 

1994 ~ 13,950 






o lotto* of mjUmmj to ovoxy 
Ltd mm) loot yOM? Ml ooot 9,991 lotto**. 3,903 ovofa 
oootoctod our off icoo for iMtfosvotloo 
ol la* oKoatioo, otfeoro ooloctivo 
oooyitil o*d rocroation f ooilitloo, oo woll mi coocauaity 

In a* Ha* oooooMury potltioa* to ootooliab priority 
for f omilioo loft boaaooV iiof orrala to Job ay p mf oi t l ii om 
mm, mi ooU mi too aoay MmmommI ro o *iwio g travoJ 
mm] vioito abroad* to booooo ootMNUobt* io now M urn o MHo go otto 




yooog lodioo f i 



to bo f iaally Moi alitor! mm] fool a post of 

» *0*t ] 

oovoral 



!«0 



It war gmnUy notod too* tnooo uao cam to touno ratnrr 

f roa Boston wrro anrinor to fulfill tboir contract* and loo wo for 

citioo uboro tfaoy folt tda i i Un ri l ornarmn oaro oroator, as null 

woo banaao * part of too c i mm uni ty Xlfo factor 



•• 



lA MaOOacbUOOttO I* 0OO of 
Hit aowiooo OOJEO roadorod to tbauu Kaon* aro scooootly ho loo 

raalm d la obanor of atatuo f roa rural o ar to nriaaaaat ■raldantt* 
Thr oppliootioai oust oo initlatod at tor aaarlooa Coaoulato la 
Moutroal foe taaa* Bocauoo of too boavy nroiotration of oaab oppli« 

WoitO| ww <Ow W9mm^mtmW^0 Orlo*v v Or v> %AMWp ^Vao oV^^o* •AAA tovo wwfWltOwa Vo wW#o> 

giotration. rronalatioo of doeoaaata, M a oaUii 

u oo «oJLL oo oottlnn ncillna filoarnnron nrolaonn too 

raduniii bat boo too loamiatiiy of foot oa too 

of «kt loot nil 1 r bnlonnlnow a nuoboar ubonu ooollootlooo 
tnltUtad ia oat off loo bnvo aooad oat of ototo* Xaa nobility 

of o noraonar ooolclafl to ootobliob blaoolf ir oloo toot of tf*o pnrolor 

oca ©oncoruod w&tb oroiotlap tblo group lo 
rooiarato by oaoaiaX loololn&ioa* oa bod to bo 

o»^pW* ^uWa# a^aoWa^pOao> "dMuMna o^oTW^VHaa^ua ™ uu^poa a^pajaraj %^& oav a •Wot rnWJF9*aWMa> noWdnoF 

niviMi l^i oucli xiooooomlotlono and too nam* uho nook ooxooooot 

|W»WWO» V *» a»W^P"0 Or «OW^^OTl910FtPOOVHaw JOrarO OTV U*UW%* W^—w/ "•^aWAO' W»WW rU^U»W*» W^IOOWJIWO'WO 

ia tho Unitod Ttttrt auot fol lo w too prneodura of pnMlno 

w*woj o^oao^oo w^ra w ™oaw^w^w/ ^^w* O9w^w)to^a> via moron ^^o^pop a^Baw# wr^voav^awa o«v w^w^woar a^^^w^wa ^■* 

ouoalob onoaklaa ff yr*i il Joxlojx la baovlly raraaaod wttb 
to tbio au ra, a ojroat aojority ooa raallrfi opoaking* 



Foaily uanoratiouo ooa ttill aoay with cnildme # 
bwotbm oad •lotors sadly Itft ia Caba* For oooo* too aotb boa 
f roa Cuba to Saoia oou toaaoo to to* tiaitad stotao aitb tffldaoH* 
oaaa by lalotiaoo ia tao Ualtod Stotoo* A fow boat oooa to Wnaiobi 
ootto via Tiooi**. taa or oaa at fiiatairt of roooootiaa Uiayiaiiy 
vloo to oator Naaioo Xaua Caao boa boon toiciao: aonttn for f oaoroblo 
action. Tbaa, oootbar oat of off! anal to auot bo aamrtiil for too 

^aoow mjov oaaao* a>^aao> w*ar ^pa»aBaww^aFoo» •• wWJMawWJMP w^a 7 btwj •^^■••joj wowfl^wa? w wwa *ot ^aa^^^P 
^^•^^^wo^P^w^oj Ow/aoswr w^aaor oa^atojo»«aioaaoaoj^p waaro»voar a^^^^ o»o>^o^oa ^^w^w^oa w*» wa^woj wa wo*p w^ wiwop 

for bar aiaot oou, otill uaito for nio arrival ♦ !«ot baring boon 

ia itaa ia oottiao too yarajiDit oaf parol rot on to doport, 

rojQuaotad oatcaaoo into laadLao oaaa rlx 
aad ooa ora tryiao aad boon laftng for tbo i r a a liai la 
tao Unitad »totoa* 



liil 




For ths many Canadians ltottd. our ssrvleco haws cowsrod all 
of affidavits *t support, BMittMot to Manf of status 1 

Uil— ■ ■» otti t ans ti p applications md sstshlishina 
h Thsrt, at least. Is no acromion of waota rss triotlsa n, 
of ths fsafUss wwr first ss visitors and then, wits 
tiss in ths United States, it is * ininai ratlwtly slsnle 
to got ths s ses ssa ry sneameitts, ansmsslrshtss and finally ths appeiot 
■sots fro* ths consols is Canada fov lossioos of Isms si ant wises. 
€MT course, with n t o sss ar y sonmlUnaa of so^lth reqeii 



However, from too countries of heavy immigrant regiatral 
sosr aewh l sn s of family separation exist. Ths jar oast 0*009 affmstwd 
is ths Italians. Brothers end sistsrs ff ths sensf id arise of fourth 
jiisfsfssjss category petitlone, omit thoir tors sinss 1934* s oifs 

of s loyally resldsnt slisa omit sloso 1961. isssntly, 
-, erne corns to torn United states on ths petition of 
united states cities* daughter, ths be ids of thros years of s 

to ho reunited with her uneerried children 
isft abroad. Hss appnow s d potition established third prmfsi 
priority, hot after waiting ems year is hopes for thorn to Join 
r, sho hss r e ter me d to Italy* 



Ths Turkish horn parent, or parents horm is Oreocc, oust 

ths prosont lam in f oroo sinss sstshTf shnsnt of ths us St— in 1924* 
nsssiying active attention now of ths legielators is Congress, H,IU 
assm t s hill s pon ss md hy ths Pi sol sunt and s garnet nnshsr of leoie- 
latere, noold solos nsny of ths promlens. 

Briefly, ths bill contains ths following oajor 



1. Ths national origins quota syston sill hs fully 
hy July 1, 19*8. 



2, An annual coiling of 170.000 isniorsnts is sstshHshsd 
ve of all ths woe t t tn Hsnispbers, cxclusivs of epeueee, 

31 yoara and pamnto of U. S. oltlasni. 



After July 1, 1*6 i, no oosntry is to receive noro than 30.000 
por yoar of ths total 170,000. 



ths interim period, bn at swing with ths 
«•*• 2990 and SSdlss Jornn 30, 1968. unuood quota Biatlil ass tr 
I orrod to on inuigratiea pool to hs nssd hy couatrioo 
aim aos r is b s cilb nd. nop l i s an ts will hs tmhsn on s first oons first 
■■ ■ ltd hnsis within ths swroowtago limitation in ths ordsr of 
priority spe cif ied in sen. 303 of ths tnsl m atlon and Nationality 

Act. 



i<^ 



S. lbs asl* Pacific Triangle pesvisisss as* abolished 
I— iiHibely. 



4. sSpissiso July 1 9 if**, tsslsraata ss*** tbs 1*0,000 csil- 
tse sail to* aeoitted en a liftt cone, first served bull aeoottHs? 
to tbs *ni levins seofs M iiiMS M 




Third netemmt MM - **rsss* wbo Dm high pe s f ess l o w s l 
skills. 



» 10* - Married mm ssd dsssbtsrs of United 
rifts fttftieMti *4» e arm tot ■ Md sistere of United 3* a tea 



Sloth Prsfsrooees UK - fessss* eith skills in etrafts 
is the united lutit fee which a dssoBstrsbl* sb stl i g t exists 



t *Ji e SsfgiM en ■eiisilltionsl entry* 



A soot ■ ■■■■* iiiii In mt to toe toUl is to establish s selling 
r 120,000 f ron tbs eounttiss of too «a lists tfcmUpbsrs who, to date* 
we boss olsssifisd ss "sonuuots". 



of this low wool 1 a ss es s* hsisstois* of soparstioo is 
• It would tools tbs fH>rtu9»sso toss* a ss i ses ! young lady 
re tu rned to Portugal for s visit, serried there, sod so return, 

permitted toss sodsr tbs pjseest Is* foe toss 



is ttois ss tsgsew rssUfrod is 1*53 



las oivsc tbs bestoesd of s 
the privilege of adjusting bis status is tbs Uoited States 
be bad arrived is tbs uoited states as s smsbs, tbs sitsetioo of 
Mr, k, is os) of son*, sees is Creese, ss a ssssaa he bad coss to 
tbs united States es soars leave to eisit rslativss tad did set re- 
turn to hie ship* within tbs year, be ess married to a sitisss of 
tbs United Stats*. They ssttbUsbsi their little boss ssd bad thsir 
first tossy. Mr* a. ssylisil to tbs Cnited (Hates tssieratiss Service 
foe ssjsstssnt of states aod ess oivss voiurtary departure rather 
than dsssctatios bssssss of bis fasily status, 4hsre was he to apply for 
visa' ss tbs lss required bis to ste>ly for ouch visa ostside tbs 
•tatsst Vie scald osly *bt*l* s seiiifist to returs to bis oooatry 






ia;j 



bi» feisth ^IN aUltasy dsaft n»>i t ^ Ma and 
fwlV *** isvo v a l yoara, ipp l Unio ns 
tut m** not m i pti d » .Huaiiy. 
iTiiwiUi to teiyi inn visa vis 

and tsavoi on a cost lficatt of Sdtntity oas 

Wi|'»*WW*^'"f •daa> O^ObOav^WO ¥»1W1WI V A a>^^O^^^A I^WpMHAv^pM S»OS 

a**** ju tfat In Jui^ t i*o - H| aajos. lattttlJJJ 





This helpful legislation is ajoflaaj by oony, nuy ralativos 
Itiog iaaily ssanlaas aad it io oapsstod t^A* to* jo ^o f t an 1 of tbs 
olll b& oaoaadlaaly aanvv siaoo as sir saw Dotitloao* as osll 

of ifHirt, •**♦, atti as ■ ry. St 

tost iitjoabsaal of ttatii la tho ttoltou *tata» A^uia **« *m 
of ilHoon! MM oow ali^m*. 




a£ t act tbs — t> K l,m it of a <*omta las tbo osa atsi o s of 

Mnalnaboso will hours will ba liittriitlai to aota as 



•*• ^ha ststistlss show, vs rocoivo aany, many sooo a sts /6s in- 



■•• ^p^^OS «TA wSS V*na> ^aHMj^PA n> na^ ^Pa^RjMltV •\»Ji Ob^adhdaw-SatraOos aansns) ^Sy^^oaaaF^^a> 01 ^OSS Ora^Os 

spooap OP^pao a^ai^a ^pnaanapwapjOT ^s^r^aoj^f sooa^papaFajnoas»o*ai0y a AwsaaMHw onat^p ai^o^ar op^^^oos ^ooo 

», aa voll as tnm sno ara aswly 
*it£ stoody* ssfsanpnt Jans, &*vo i*at je«M a 
flat and boonfit ttaa furoitnso to wait tbs arrival of tools f oatiios* 




Notably, soon ton faailiat la tbs oast yoas la too 
vicinity novo boon nisi tul aith reistivos fxaa babiaU 
castalo. h brotbax, a sistor sad a fatnor, ana ftsfloani 
aotnaso atsa ot lost limps' oxit visas to dtyast fsoa !)•*.«•*• 
Too LA too ani o n boas «af *, wao fas to* oast oia voasa and soaoand as* 



far tat noosooasy salt poxaiv *-u- ~** 

atta ti 



finally, at £*oto* 9 oas aans bayay atta tbs aur-'ival of bos 

las oiussly Latviaa astbsi sad f stoat is f atbas la aspaily ramitof 

aita tools oJaULdsssu »s asontly» a vUowod aatsax # suooiyiug witb 

**^ss ^▼wt saa^%^o^oa^paj|o> jp a>aP^MoaP9# aoa a aso*v o^ai^ovsa o^^oaa^osa^Was wa vo» %aa^p oa^p^a^p ooa»v 

too fsmsit la balag oivsa to bar oawyator to iaaaj U»£»*»u* ^Oo lo 
osilslaj oa looviao boUlad a arsly aoaulsad fisiaas. uf vba 

^^^^^* ^^^^^^^w w^^^^^f ^v ^o^o^^o^as ^^^^t^^^^i^^u^^^^^^^ ^0"4s ^m ^Boasoaoj ^k aoaano^o (^^a^^^a^p wv^v^p ^^^^^»^p ^^^o^m^^^p^^f^^^o^^^o 



^a ^v^oaaB •ona^s ^^vaojo^ao oaaasy o^bui oiaa ^^^oja**oioaaaa^ ^ 

ossvlos la too Uaitad 3tatsa Asay oados tbs Lodas Act, Xlaally 
f loo ooass aasvios # pssaittad to sobs to tbs Ualtoa 
sad oas ostmllMd, ilia fstltsr oas aalo to ooosao t ooa 

as a sofoaoo. tools olvos raiuin aa**«J« &vi 

Goaulato Is saoay to laws too 



L24 



aavo Bgallad for Boooporto, The 
»» oT thai* ^mil who boa BBBartod wit boat 
bbbIM tbo Iroa OiKtalm ^mut i tnois 



In KumNmlU, 4,687 porooaa bbbb Batarollaod 1b 19ad, Tbo 
officoo iillod 3 # 27Q BJpHootlont Im B0t4tioBB for 
It io aot*i>lo to moo** tiit taosa apian, attaro! i oori 

f ivo yooro mflmn it nnaylotod, too ioitiia stop io 

aBBBBjB/ OB>Bj B*^B»^BB apBBBjp OK^p B>^pB* , B£BBoBBjBB^BjB* ^^BpB^BB^^^^^B BB^Bi^aBBJBfrBBj^BBBBBjB BjB^r ^ BB^p to>o> B> ^^B^Br 

and toaaa In tbo flaamiBBiil In, wa «!*• to aaoa applicant oar booklot 9 
Tfca Conailtatiaa of tho tloitad Stataa oito imaatiiiiBj aw* *■■—■■ fa* 
NataraUsatioB lai«rt nation* Yaarly, oooo io.uOO oooh looao* aro dio- 

for clUioaaafa clmti, civic «mf patriotic 



of otrtaiaiag too oaooaoary birtB* aarrlooa oad daata 

A oooo i» mint lamaluocl a iJMttntif ¥ liaia in f rliMil At 

oorivod ettttaaotilp throoBB aa* axaarffatoor bob bob aatarmliaad 

^^^^ OrO"^^^» BB^^^^^BJ^P ^OBO '^BB^BJ B> ^tOj^^BBB^bB^BBtB" BBBBPBBBra) aBBBa* BJ BBB^BO^^BV B^ ^BBBBB B^BBBB B^-jA ^^BT^* BOB ^O^^BJ 

Uaitod Statoa OB o aiaor, rotBraod, aarriod im Portaeal OBd had hio 

fBBjUy thOBB. CBBBBB tO tBB UoitOd StBtBO OB B citi*OB # iB MMM Of fOrtO 
to OOt pg OO f Of BOB BltiBBBBBip^ OBB Bad tO BOOB IBilBBBBl im tBB 

United stotoo of nor om fataar prior to bio tooaty-f irat birthdotB, 

MOBy OOBtBO Of fortB tO *OC*tO f OIIO BB BBd oitBOOOOO la BlBtB B t atatoa 

BTB BBt yOt BUBBOBoful* £BB l» * dtJUo* Of tBB UBBtfd StatBB, But 
to got tUB BBoBBBBry certificate ^wv^ tola foot iB Otill tO OB 

OOlBOd* m BBOlBtod B BBBBBT Of p o rB OBB la rB^Alai&B tBBir BBOB C BII* 




BBtfc B BOBBBV it hit BB 

fool that bio cultBxo 



In on ovalaatioo of bob bobb for IBM, m f lad oo off lraatlaa 

BBtf BOBltlBB BBBBBr tO tBB HBBBtloB, "DQKd 1MB DIVISION MIA A 

WaT>?". Too Ibbbbbbo of auaaaro io ooo 



J 



Tfea />*«iga Wtm MM «** a** tfc* **xvisa tita it at* tu providM fear 
ttii t fitrttaMMM?** taa ftaj ac aa >f tfc* alio* saalatrttio** ova* 
133,000* #te« that «»•■— Iwiiit* «mM aavaat* in taa mucs of fasalfiai 
box ;. Hm aataal *4aa*o o* ?,<**,:*>» paiaoaa a* iostifi axiaiu its 

vita * /orai^a fcaitiirn mi vitiaia taa «t*t«. 



4a an faiar>aat agaiaat tbm ■mini 

Maa 9 aaaon aad dUldsan tvm otaax Xaaaa «aa 
a££4aa *a4ata*aod ay taa Plata tialgiAil 4a aa&a&ay thai* 

ia taa soa* aa 
loop fa*» aaa laaana to 



« 



ttm rttaqar aay aavaa? aacaaa a aaa* partly oat 
tm Imrmi ■aalat it by «ay a* a ataaa <*oajraa of 



Naaaaabuaatta* aa a p4oaaaa la aaay fiaXda* itallnH tta 
•ibility to %im f oaaia* aaaa 4a taa Caoaaooaata ay aaUhlUaaaal a* 

^awayav aa^a^^FTajfly^aja^ap apaa ♦^y^ » a) a»aa^p ^«aa«a»ta> %aa» yifli a^^a^F^w«F*awna» aaavay 4flHpa)W^^^> o4B 

aaavtoaa f*oa 7 t 2«3 ia 1*4* to 43 t #fe> 4a iaaa. taa Oiv&aioa U aaa 

aaly a aaa*aa aiawa taa Jt'oaaaoa auoaiciaa aa aoaly *unt 4votJ 4jflaioaaata 

&va aaay a*oa&aaa # last it aaa oa a aa a Qevacaaaat 
aata* tim coaaaaaaalta to aataaHah aataal aaaaf 4ta fa* 

l t&f aa aa44 aa to taa aaaaoaa aa* f oaa4#a a4*ta* 



aad naataat atta aaay pabllc aad privata 

4a oav aataai aaa4ataaaa aad 



e4t4aaaaa4» aaa* UaataaaHaa a»t*ara« J** «aiat4oaa aata taa uaitod 



ticM «ad >■■! at— a fraa that o ff ioa« Caaaaxat4oa vita 




callad aa aa for aaaia- 
aad e4t4jpaaahip 4aaa aad aa* 
Saa 



ijjk 



m OMtRICT 




aa Jaaa 30, IMS, this Aeaacy eaapletad 4a yaara of aarvioa u 
raa Ukm%9 of taia C iaa un ii na th, Dasiag taa f irat two ywi of oar 

~ & ^ r Q VHP ^0» 0»a^aa^a>^ W ^aOn w*^P aaa^anaW^^n^W^a^^atOa^^^ai ^^O* aaajaoaar 



46 



OUT atatiatioa iatfioata that 3,0*7 aarvi aaa waro provided for 
90 eoaanaitiaa 1 cm Mail in thm four aa>ta i» eoantiaa oi 
oor StaW. In atfflUfoa, wa **t ■ in ■flip liimii aita 53 lomr rooi- 

ia otaaa porta of Ml ooaatry t mnUm 



■tirwMUly aa* gfaalo Statiatica 
from 73 eoaatriaa, tha aa jority coala? from Caaiaa, Uaitod 
'if fa, utnaayi Italy, Poland, Jamaica, Oroooo, Tia1aad w 



Xba Majority of ci HI Btnahl n applications durin g ana paat 

to ooaplata thttr crltiwanahip at too aail iatt poaafnln data 
of joa appiftaaflsi or aooanaa of taair intantiaaa to taaval 
Taia aald taoo ia taa oaao of «U ■aaaartiau of 
at tea Ala Foaoa Oaao aara at waatooaa* 



of Map 18, 1904 anion nasi ar ad aa aaeooatitotioaal too laa valatino 
to loaa of oitiaoaaaip ay rasftoaaca taasad of 



A» an atatad ia aaa laat Aaaual itapart , it 

that tba pi ts an t Conoroaa noald oiva f avorablo 

tfaa Jaitad *ta«oo» Mtaaaon at tamo writing ao ohaaga naa baoo ands, 

F Praoidaat Joaaaoo* Qjaaum punliolty oo tala 
ia aaa aaaa, aa aaaa dalaoad amtn tnlooaaaa ealla, i 

ia oar statiatica. Many tiaaa aa f ooad it difflaalt to 
tha aaUaa that oaat aa w aaa had toad aa haard 

ia taa Xanioration 




ta acktitioa to aaaiatlaa iadinidaala ia taa praparatioa 
>, affidavlta of lajiul to apoaaoa ralat 
adjuat thair atay ia taa uaitod atataa, otaars ta 
toitad statoa rnanltf Sorvieo ia 
ia aavaaal of taa ta asllod missis "Oanfsaitoa 




c 



V47 



A f oo of thoaa, Hiwih of military aorvlca in tha Uaitad 

lore**, man pnmittad to apply for aftfaaanalp ohlla 

grants tha privilaga to apply to adjust thai* atay in 



^HHaatHF ^^ ^y^M a ^w «^^H^va aj^^aa^^oa^^B 

tha individual a* 






ao ntlda rata tha Pnaaral 



atay in tha Oaatad 
certainly Iwlif atoa hao 
ia toward too alion 



gitiaata aoa, 16 yaara of ago. to roaida atta hia ia taa Uaitad 

•* w^a>o^araa0 a^^p aa^p aw^a ^^^anaasNPwap V^F wWPwaapnntv'O' aaanaaap a^^^^ #naaaa» ^pan^papi aaaaoal eft IMiatva! 

nay of life la thie eountry. A petition una filed ay the epouee of 
thie aaa oa taa baaia of taa uaitad fitataa Coast Deolelon of Maw Yeah 
City in tha caaa of Mrtgm %> Bener*, At taa an marl, aa ere aanit* 
ino foaaal a4*ed*catlene? thiepetitien. 

During taa year, lettere of aeleoae aero aant to o46 newly arrived 
deetlned to livo la aaa 
Link in fc^*— *— to aaeint 

new any of life. Many of 
delfuht at leaielauj that 

aa* Having been thee couviaeed af 

la aa 
aiU ba aa 



to ad juat to their 



nianto oa 



that tha aXlaaa 9 lateeeet to oaa atata and 



final hear toga tew enteral lrntlon at taa 

local Court and alnaya r o a e iv o d tha eeeenel and 



cat 



with 



joyed ^leeeant ralationa with both private and pah Ua 



to 




taa rail River off lea aoaplatod tha flecel yoar 
1905 with a total af 4,17a eecvieee Mondaaad to cilente, 
faon aa loealitiee ia 



' 






128 



Ifci* total, 4,178, w to Idmmm is 
eUanta ia acute 19 of forty-ana diffaxoat a a tl a n a. 



A total erf 4s3 on arrival alls* war* racaivacl at thia off ica 
ani oncaaar lsttsra aar* aaat ta thaaa iadividuala laforaiag than 

^fc s^^^^» ar^va* a# ojanja^^nn^^ *^ aaa^wpaaaa^aaa^^p •fw#*wJ o^vop aPBwjpjpnpan) ap^a BjnPRaanpan^a# ^p^^ v^a^^s? ^a-aaaa^p^p^v ^pa^a^p 

la aat racordnd is oar atatistica* jaiy tboaa ana nail a* avita ta 
aa ^ or info&antlon pax sin fan a pajrtlcttlar yrohlaa nra than naaoraaa* 

Of tba tiaaajaHfat aarvad by this branch offics, taa city •* 
Fall Rivar inana taa llat of ellaata aad taa city of nan? 
raafca aaaood* This District Aiaait visit* Mas Badf or4 
and uaaally aajtoyatara a hssyy aocttload oa that alalia 



Taa bain of taa sorVloal consists of a fit aaaaliii»i ianioration 

^ a aKpPfl^aaap ^papj^pjwp*'^p t^w^p pr pa%p* vai^Pa ajwaasppspan^ ^^w^^a* *pp op ajanaaajpr ^p^pjv w ^p^r^v w w*^^ ^p^^^^*»^p b 
^na^as a ^pf^wp^ob aasn PnppW(P*aap*wpajp^^^ fc*BP*P"^ ^^*^^p>^pripypjp^^FW^aspn^njpon^^ bw>ws/*# w^^aa 

of 9tat* anal Foreign Servian oetlcss 1 Mi mat pat taa nasi** 

v'orld ta»tt~ou r*jTi u^jouvjJU* pnatptnl ~ii*J 
ajajaaj aa j into Uis I IpAaaa atataat mi Waal 
n nffl q to^irtai aad a****** anlafl it aaact ta j kjpx>aaiikla ta laalarata 

to taa Uaitad Ststan otjIots t&ay hansj class family tina* 




oar couatriaa lika 



Taa aajfiy satiannXity aaJaaap aaaa ia 
la oaT peoples of taa snail quot* coentry of fioztug*X+ ttoey 
of 498 nhich Iraluosp taa ^ f it f tlwtr t t and t ha 




from thai* 




Haa leoielntist) ia 



tha a 

huv* fen) ~» 

epanajeopenenan> o><ep*nvis_ > 

to taa f aat 



allena ia thia leeallty ara 
aatl children* They ara toiral peeferonei 

tPa^¥pwaFj(^P^F*iaT aw %#^PWa>aji ta%tipWp^aaa) •aa^*aTaa» aV%p«aV #t Hr*JPa> aa%*aa apaa> 

QakijMj taa iax>i 1 l>T 1 1 pi of taa tTaajly aamt a 



Opaoraaa to aliaiaata 
* will be a 
of thia aaa 



it 



If 

a 

of 



it ia 



jfid aiatara la thia 



aaitiag liat aa 



It ia aviaant that taa 
aith arias ia ita atatawida 
fal aaaiataaoa to raaiaaota of 



th of 

•yap 
origin* 



( 



- 






12 



Ifcia otticm km mm Mm • port ia Mm 

*m f tb* OBfm/ftCtVJPSr at S0OB* OttltO fO* tbO UaltSd StStSB 

Psoosaa has* bun aaolstad ia appXicatiooo fee United stutN 
•hip «»J v, na si t oo* is regard to ■o cur ity 



Dusias tit* year os bee* bad a aultitod* erf ioqoirie* 
"Bill*" by Cuugpee* end Hilm ills by rissf ilsnl Lyndon B* 

rtVJM tfr* pSOSOttt lOBnSSSSiOB XaoS* •OpOCieXXy by ptltOM 

relative* eoulU be eff**ted» At p cmil t the annual quot* of »e for 

^^0> ^B*BO*i^BF WW ■p'BaejOjeSS^e^^ee*eS"SaepJS 7 •^^^OJ^ OBBasS o*^p*Sp ^Br SVOOSSSe IPk^^WwW VlvWB BBBJB^BSBB MP S* VWVjyf 

w^U^B^BPOjoeO OP"O^B •B^P^^OV^PBtPa ^J^WpfW^ ^P^B? OW SJ *0^O*OP O} ^B w ^P^^»^fc^p ■VMB^^pph0^p ^B ^B^BvOfc B> *^^B 

deeo relatlveo eod foully spAift to bo reunited* 



la Merob* ee esse h a p p y to boor toot too woreeeter qbbsb Catholic 
Cotboiie rhsrltfss will a cc ep t Protectant end Orthnllt hooo 
/or inter •country adoptlone* end tb* Jeoloh Penili 

of too adopt I a* f eaily ouot bo dose by oo accredited iiyom / ia too 
ototo at too adopting fpjii1jr"*_ Although thlo io bamifliiltl for the 



to jraowally drop thio pfaooo car tho tr p s ogra a until there 

esse oooo ia wereeeter ooaaty poxf ooaias oaob a function* This re** 
viood «**^*^^«* hv thooo too aoaneioo Is a hlocilon tax tho children 

^ *»r^»^^^^w ^p"^m^mmm^B^j ^vfr w^^^*»^*r^p ^r^^^w vpjpT^p**^^*? ^P^p^P *»^^ w*> ^^*^p^#**»t^p**»*»*^^ **>^p*9 ^•••^p ^p*»»^»>*»«*pj»^^p*» 

fit by it, ooao at too orphan*, as tho oooo la Korea, 
iraHoit "oalldron at transoV"* Xtiio plea nil! OBpodlto opplica- 



f tho seeoad lirssst city la too *tete* aad ito *nvir- 



PoXi*h 



i, tint aad mo pad *ai*mtl*n 

i 9 furnished this braaoh office aith 3,346 
oliaato too S,SS3 ■sreiooa* Xhia service cover* aaay aopocto at 
aeelnllatlon, laoiorotioo aad eltiaonsblp at too oliaato* 



Tho Agont attend* too aatuxaliaatiaa hssTiaoa at Superior oourt 
ia aSsceeter. Xt io gratifying to aoo tho aaay t aniliar 
os* aoo being admitted to oasl iisaohln EoDOciaXly too ooao with 
as bad a p ie e l o a* ouch ao 9 aa oXdssXy oasaa oao arrivod tram tsoXaad 
ia 1910 but did aot caisol.ni too aaas at too obis os exact data at 
arrival, a hod a difficult task rOPUia* mlssosi too ass rogiotry 
ia uisamlm oita oatusaliootioa. Maay majHlm aad 
ass tsps sss ut sd aooag too oao oitioaoa, but it oas oa« 
tarss clorgyaan soorn ia aaoag a at sa y of oixty~thjroo 
psrsosaw Tho local m majM picturad tasa oa too f I 



Xa ios th si citiaoaship aattor. oo asoistad f las adult 
of a family aha arrived ia too Uaitad Statoo f roa Csaods ia 1944 oith 
thai* oorivatlv* oppUcatiooo. Iboy oasa sasa bUosis XSJO aad ISSSt 



c 



130 



ia 1M0. fit imam in i m M «• fc » iMi lnt m birth at auiUgt. 
with, laeb wNr of the f anily now baa a eertif leate to 

BMi ^n»ew/l * 4V ye»a> WW «^Ba>%^KI waS^^P wai 



tbJLe aaaa and all ptioaaa of Utihi* jmt tan and cltlrenebln and 

with its 





iapotae foo tna aaalatanea tMt off fan 



leoielAtioa. edll be a further 
i oil! oivo in on* eff arte "to 



and ita maidanta of foenian eerinitt"* 




Of 1965 f iaoal 
5 t asa aarvloaa to the l aa ld oa l a of Wayrtnaafc Valley, a 
datable inert a ea nana l&at yoar* Xaia Aoant baa otffloe booaa am 
veealy in tbe LowoU city Hall and tbe etatietieo anon tbat Loanll 

• for on* attanliiHlaso that 1634 services at Lowell were giiven. 



jf tna nana itianallii naana anion finally ana eaccoeafully 
after ate yeare of pereletenee andaavoi ana tna arrival 
U.S.S.5U of a young adalt nan to ba nanJUd aitb bin fatbar. 
Ha ar ri vad at chrietaaa tina and it ana indeed a nanny aataaian for 
tna fatbar ana bod f irat nana to ana na ain yoara ana. Ha related 
to no a eoet aaeilwB atory of bow, in 1907. bia forner wife bad 
"blibaajupiir tnaix aix yoar old nan and throe Una am danohtara ia 
tna aid dle of tna aioht* She bad taken tna ablldioa to New York 

^^^^^m ae^ePBeaB'wewerop ^n eenewaa^ taeeeey w>"d»#^eFwej a>tw eaeewBi wrawvyqa^eje^ %/*i-A»**ann ~*0 ^a> 

to an tbat tna Soviet oovn iiih it ana than offering f omaa 

f roe | i m gi bank to ttan Soviet Union nine land for n nana. Ma and 




wa nt e d taen ia tel y nalhlaa to da aitb tna Soviet 

en 




tbat day in 1947 antU 1959* Mr. X had triad, 
to brine, ot Uaet bia nan beck, toon January. 1919 until jaet 
Chrietaaa, 1994, an worked iHUuantly aitb tho fatbar. exploring all 
aoaoibilitiao. Finally, tna day nana when oar paraiatanco paid 
and tna boy ana uemlttod to leave tna •■aint union. «e are no 



to lanan tna Sovint Ualaeu Mb in dm la tan 

w^ ^i^a^weF^p vw*ea» w^^^aev wnwaaf ^^e» nan we ■eewv* etna vwwwej 

.... 



( 






131 



a** Ml Juat aoa ath iao m md mm| la taa 
>, Mil M toi lly iatlooaoo and mAm o«r mm*. *• mm*, for 
* young lady TUttino iron tho final ill im Im mb 1U « Sho 

Md MM 0AmM VOlMStMfy OOpOrtttrO to MMJ thO Uoi 

to grant MT IHIIIIBII Of Otay OB a MMftB tO MM** bftOio 

by tlM United StalM XawWntion Mid HrtMiUiHiw 



thO HiHIMi OMT OMMBao fill MB tOM !• tlUl 

MjOMM, MJMMfr 4 OMM\4; MM Af% Mj MOjMaMMMM mM^MmMMMMMmI MMMB? M^MMMM\ MmLm^m\ 

tlM AMtrlecn consular autaoritiM in Hantroal, CMtda oo taoy mmi 

MlUilfl TMllUilHtiW VtOOO. NOW f MJ hMt tOMHl Ml Mi addi tto M l 
Mlth tlM Cabana* That U # taa MMfiloflMi or* affidavit* 

mmf mm mmVommV ^JU^^m^KommImoWm ^Pmj ▼*PWn MJMOMnvwJn^r^WP mmv mmw^mmomb 

<mb Cuba to a aa U t, Cneo taoy aro la 



' MJpport to tat 

w ^P^BMOOw ^^^'^^MO'O l^RM^y *> 



country* mmmtmI xaa&liM bwt >1hmW mm in tbio 



M Md to MU a JWJ0 ttrvllM COUpl* MM ttMir 

ola yaar old aoa mm apaia infM t d a viae aftojr another m mmmm mI 

by too Qaltod statoa Public Haatta Qffi M r 4a nmIm mvmImI 



m mm otiU MaluaabU. Happy, ubm oo mm abio to mmm a 




to a eitlMD a* tan United StotM that tho 

Milch bad previouely doiilod hie 

with a MiaioaatXlM before too 8|Moial leouiry afVioer, 



abroad oa ■Malt of client*, talk* mmm re M ilo a nUMi M claeeM, 
tee dtaaoainattM of radio aad MM pa yoji publicity, traMlatica aad 

■ mowyro ua»\mi, unmuw enu iMterrua** •• •a** wmi ^w?^ ^v 
oat a aoot eventful year, Ae tao t iooal year drew to a cIom, at mj 
to aova to aaaa ioaiitoM Quarters ia a eectlon oaf taa city 
raftftoM will be relocatiag 



FISCAL vpap 7/1/64 - 6/30/65 



INFORMATION 

Booklets, forms, 

Ci t ize ns hip 

Immigratio n 

Travel __— 

Other ______ 



blanks 



FORMS FILLED 

AR-11 (Change of Address I 
DSP-70(Biographic Data)_ 
DSP-78( Cuban Waiver) 



FS-497(Visa Registration) 

* . _ • • • 



FS-510(Imm.Visa Application) 
G-28 (Representative Reg.) 

I-53(Alien Registration) 

I-90(Dupl.Alien Reg. Card) 
I-129B(Petition for Visa) 
I-130( Relative Petition) 
I-131(Reentry Permit) 



I -140( Skilled Labor Petition) 
I-191(re:Unrelinquished Dom. ) 
I-212(Per.to reenter after Dep 

I -243( Removal to Native Country) I 

I -256A( Suspension Deportation) 
I -290B( Appeal) 



I-484(Foreign Clearance )_ 
I-485(Registry for Citizenship 
I -485 (Status Adjustment) 



I-506(Temp. Change Status ) 

I -539 (Extension Visitor Stay)_ 

I-550(Verification Legal Entry 

I -591 (Refugee -Escapee Assuranc<J) 

I -600 (Orphan Application) 

I -601 (Waiver) 



I-612(Exch. Student Waiver) 
Other Immigration Forms 



N-300( Declaration of Intention; 
N-400(Pet,for Naturalization) 
N-401 (Repatriation) 



N-402( Petition Nat. of Child)_ 
N-426(Verification Mil.Serv. ) 

N- 565 (Duplicate Certificate) 

N-577(Cit. Verification Abroad) 

N-5S85(Info. from Records) 

N-600(Deriv. Cert. Application) 
Other Naturalization Forms 

Page Total 




12 












^_ 






( 



. 






- 



1 

o 

■ 

EXECUTION OF AFFIDAVITS 2327 


213 


U 
2 

5 

329 


go 

S d 

163 


& WORCESTER 
O 


| 

O 
H 

3392 


Affidavit of Support 2005 


80 


201 


97 


270 


2653 


Affidavit of Facts 75 


6 


46 


2 


4 


133 


Certificate of Identity 49 


1 


1 


1 


1 


53 


U-S.S. R- Exit Permits 31 


- 


3 


- 


1 


35 


Polish Assurance 31 


7 


17 


- 


36 


91 


Other Notarial 136 


119 


61 


63 


48 


427 


OTHER SERVICES 7498 


439 


1311 


301 


511 


10060 


Change of Status (Cases) 535 


52 


74 


33 


33 


727 


Appearance at Hearings 177 


13 


1 


- 


4 


195 


Interpretation & Trans. 918 


1 


111 


- 


121 


1151 


Letters 5863 


313 


954 


263 


353 


7746 


Other 5 


60 


171 


5 


- 


241 


NEWCOMER INTERVIEW 1882 


475 


33 


372 


140 


2902 


Page Total 11707 


1127 


1673 


836 


1011 


16354 


First Page Total 11908 


3051 


4165 


2861 


4321 


26306 


GRAND TOTAL 23,615 


4178 


5838 


3697 


5332 


42660 



LlXl 
















































■ 




; 






c 





BOSTON 
ETHNIC A 


RIVER 

TO nat: 


SPRING- 
LAWRENCE FIELD 

ONALITY STATISTICS 


WORCESTER 
156 


1 

TOTAL 


Albania 


54 


^ 


2 


1 


213 


Algeria 


15 


- 


- 


1 


- 


16 


Antigua 


6 


mm 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Argentina 


161 


2 


37 


8 


25 


233 


Armenia(R.or T. ) 


24 


- 


69 


4 


88 


185 


Aruba 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Australia 


24 


- 


7 


3 


7 


41 


Austria 


118 


9 


5 


12 


19 


163 


Bahamas 


10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


Barbados 


297 


- 


- 


47 


3 


347 


Belgium 


36 


** 


31 


36 


20 


123 


Bermuda 


49 


- 


1 


11 


31 


92 


Bolivia 


83 


- 


7 


- 


- 


90 


Brazil 


202 


21 


11 


- 


19 


253 


Br. Guiana 


13 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13 


Bulgaria 


27 


— 


2 


2 


- 


31 


Canada 


2,719 


107 


1,064 


547 


644 


5,081 


Ceylon 


5 


• 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Chile 


95 


- 


1 


- 


- 


96 


China 


467 


196 


40 


26 


42 


771 


Colombia 


202 


12 


55 


3 


34 


306 


Congo 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Costa Rica 


107 


• 


3 


6 


- 


116 


Cuba 


2,265 


3 


883 


55 


161 


3,367 


Cyprus 


15 


- 


4 


- 


1 


20 


Czechoslovakia 


56 


• 


4 


20 


5 


85 


Danzig 


2 


M 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Denmark 


77 


m 


1 


15 


14 


107 


Dominican Republic 


106 


— 


82 


3 


4 


195 


Ecuador 


81 


- 


53 


6 


- 


140 


Egypt 


73 


5 


49 


7 


16 


150 


El Salvador 


24 


- 


- 


- 


- 


24 


England 


577 


93 


127 


205 


145 


1,147 


Estonia 


7 


- 


2 


- 


2 


11 


Finland 


21 


- 


6 


5 


27 


59 


Formosa 


9 


— 


- 


- 


- 


9 


France 


258 


22 


91 


58 


66 


495 


Germany 


666 


57 


185 


202 


195 


1,405 


Ghana 


13 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13 


Greece 


848 


54 


456 


140 


257 


1,755 


Guatemala 


27 


- 


1 


2 


- 


30 


Haiti 


158 


1 


9 


5 


10 


183 


Honduras 


102 


— 


9 


- 


1 


112 


Hong Kong 


30 


7 


11 


- 


7 


55 


Hungary 


192 


9 


78 


24 


47 


350 


Iceland 


10 


- 


m 


- 


1 


11 


India 


66 


2 


102 


3 


84 


257 


Indonesia 


33 


- 


1 


33 


7 


74 


Iran 


44 


— 


47 


• 


13 


104 


Iraq_ 


18 


m 


6 


2 


- 


26 


Ireland 


1,462 


3 


58 


138 


139 


1,800 


Israel 


81 


— 


11 


— 


33 


125 


Italy 


3,667 


51 


692 


299 


1,003 


5,712 


Page Total 


15,709 


654 


4,303 


2,029 


3,326 


26,021 



( 






Jamaica 


BOSTON 
299 


KALL 
RIVER 

4 


LAWRENCE 

5 


SPRING- 
FIELD 

200 


WORCESTER 

7 


TOTAL 
515 


Japan 


64 


12 


9 


117 


29 


'231 


Jordan 


16 


1 


7 


6 


10 


40 


Kenya 


51 


- 


- 


- 


5 


55 


Korea 


67 


1 


21 


28 


25 


142 


Latvia 


102 


2 


4 


5 


7 


120 


Lebanon 


107 


27 


282 


47 


63 


526 


Liberia 


18 


- 


- 


1 


- 


19 


Libya 


11 


- 


1 


14 


17 


43 


Lithuania 


255 


- 


37 


5 


88 


385 


Macau 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Malaya 


5 


- 


- 


3 


- 


8 


Mexico 


93 


2 


19 


12 


15 


141 


Montserrat 


151 


- 


- 


1 


- 


152 


Morocco 


9 


1 


- 


7 


- 


17 


Netherlands 


133 


- 


20 


28 


49 


230 


New Zealand 


9 


- 


8 


- 


4 


21 


Nicaragua 


9 


«■ 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Norway 


52 


40 


3 


4 


10 


109 


Other Countries 


82 


- 


1 


8 


6 


97 


Pakistan 


2 


- 


2 


- 


2 


6 


Palestine 


32 


- 


21 


4 


2 


59 


Panama 


137 


5 


- 


27 


13 


182 


Paraguay 


4 


m 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Peru 


121 


— 


- 


26 


6 


153 


Philippines 


316 


23 


20 


4 


23 


386 


Poland 


1,207 


115 


280 


282 


604 


2,488 


Portugal 


726 


2,841 


166 


117 


21 


3,871 


Puerto Rico 


12 


- 


1 


1 


4 


18 


Rumania 


49 


- 


6 


4 


10 


69 


Saudi Arabia 


5 


— 


n 


m 


- 


5 


Scotland 


178 


10 


21 


56 


49 


314 


South Africa 


34 


7 


8 


2 


- 


51 


Spain 


97 


12 


13 


36 


21 


175 


St. Lucia 


6 


- 


- 


m 


- 


6 


Sudan 


4 


— 


1 


- 


- 


5 


Sweden 


82 


7 


6 


8 


41 


144 


Switzerland 


68 


— 


- 


4 


3 


75 


Syria 


100 


1 


13 


11 


12 


137 


Thailand 


12 


— 




3 


11 


26 


Trinidad 


C4 


1 




14 


4 


102 


Turkey 


279 


m 


52 


24 


97 


452 


Ukraine 


33 


1 


m 


5 


2 


41 


U.S.S.R. 


246 


11 


50 


65 


34 


406 


United States 


2,237 


396 


418 


479 


683 


4,213 


Uruguay 


22 


• 


_ 


— 


- 


22 


Venezuela 


36 


— 


11 


1 


4 


52 


Vietnam 


3 


4 


5 


— 


- 


12 


Wales 


7 


— 


— 


— 


- 


7 


West Indies ( Other j_ 


129 


- 


1 


5 


- 


135 


Yugoslavia 


103 


1 


23 


4 


25 


156 


Page Total 


7,906 


3,524 


1,535 


1,668 


2,006 


16,639 


1st Page Total 


15,709 


654 


4,303 


2,029 


3,326 


26,021 


GRAND TOTAL 


23,615 


4,178 


5,838 


3,697 


5,332 


42,660 



JL 



} 


BOSTON 
- 6/30/6f 


FALL 
RIVER 

L C 


LAWRENCE 
V L I T I E 


SPRING- 
FIELD 

S 


WORCESTER 
All Offi< 


1 

TOTAL 


Fiscal Year 7/1/64 






OFFICE 


es 


Abington 


22 








22 


Acton 


12 


- 


1 


mm 


- 


13 


Acushnet 


- 


34 


- 


- 


- 


34 


Adams 


7 


- 


- 


11 


- 


18 


Agawam 


- 


- 


- 


46 


- 


46 


Ames bury 


2 


- 


13 


- 


- 


15 


Amherst 


6 


- 


- 


16 


- 


22 


Andover 


13 


- 


126 


- 


- 


139 


Arlington 


288 


- 


- 


- 


- 


288 


Ashburnham 


1 


m 


— 


- 


1 


2 


Ash by 


1 


— 


• 


- 


- 


1 


Ashland 


8 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Athol 


6 


- 


- 


- 


14 


20 


Attleboro 


22 


33 


— 


- 


- 


55 


Auburn 


■B 


— 


» 


- 


88 


88 


Avon 


10 




- 


- 


- 


10 


Ayer 


78 


— 


5 


- 


5 


88 


, Barnstable 


14 


14 






— 


28 


Barre 


- 






- 


19 


19 


Bedford 


34 


— 


6 


- 


- 


40 


Belchertown 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Bellingham 


20 


• 


- 


- 


- 


20 


Belmont 


276 


• 


1 


- 


- 


277 


Beverly 


64 


— 


20 


- 


- 


84 


Billerica 


33 


— 


7 


- 


- 


40 


Blandford 


— 


— 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Bolton 


1 


— 


■j 


- 


3 


4 


Boston 


10,857 


1 


62 


1 


5 


10,926 


Bourne 


29 


16 


- 


- 


- 


45 


Boxborough 


• 


m 


2 


- 


- 


2 


Boxford 


1 


m 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Boylston 


■ 


_ 


- 


- 


32 


32 


Braintree 


57 


— 


- 


- 


- 


57 


Bridgewater 


15 


14 


- 


- 


- 


29 


Brockton 


280 


4 


- 


- 


- 


284 


Brookf ield 


1 


- 


- 


- 


27 


28 


Brookline 


794 


— 


5 


- 


- 


799 


Burlington 


69 


- 


- 


- 


- 


69 


Cambridge 


1,821 




9 


^ 


m 


1,830 


Canton 


45 


m 


5 


- 


- 


50 


Carlisle 


3 


— 


- 


- 


- 


3 


4c. Carver 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


■J-Charlemont 


— 


— 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Charlton 


- 


- 


- 


- 


37 


37 


Chatham 


1 


mm 


- 


- 


- 


1 

















Chelmsford 


BOSTON 
6 


FALL 
RIVER 

BB 


LAWRENCE 
72 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


TOTAL 
78 


Chelsea 


248 


- 


1 


- 


- 


249 


Chesterfield 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Chi cope e 


2 


- 


- 


589 


- 


591 


Clinton 


6 


- 


- 


- 


110 


116 


Cohasset 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Concord 


60 


- 


- 


- 


- 


60 


Dal ton 








5 


_ 


5 


Danvers 


58 


- 


8 


- 


- 


66 


Dartmouth 


6 


158 


- 


- 


- 


164 


Dedham 


129 


- 


- 


- 


- 


129 


Deerfield 


• 


— 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Dennis 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Dighton 


— 


12 


- 


- 


- 


12 


Dover 


17 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Dracut 


4 


- 


94 


- 


- 


98 


Dudley 


— 


- 


- 


- 


81 


81 


Dunstable 


— 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Duxbury 


23 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23 


East Brookfield 








. 


2 


2 


East Longmeadow 


■B 


— 


- 


24 


- 


24 


Eastharapton 


BB 


- 


- 


17 


- 


17 


Easton 


8 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Everett 


307 


_ 


— 


- 


- 


307 


Fairhaven 


7 


100 








107 


Fall River 


7 


2,266 


m 


- 


- 


2,273 


Falmouth 


40 


39 


- 


■B 


- 


79 


Fitchburg 


10 


- 


- 


- 


65 


75 


Foxborough 


14 


5 


- 


- 


- 


19 


Framingham 


232 


- 


- 


- 


11 


243 


Franklin 


65 


— 


m 


- 


- 


65 


Gardner 


3 








66 


69 


George town 


4 


— 


5 


- 


- 


9 


Gill 


— 


— 


- 


4 


• _ 


4 


Gloucester 


136 


— 


- 


- 


- 


136 


Grafton 


6 


7 


— 


- 


105 


118 


Granby 


2 


— 


- 


14 


- 


16 


Great Barrington 


3 


- 


— 


13 


- 


16 


Greenfield 


13 


m 


- 


5 


- 


18 


Groton 


2 


- 


5 


- 


- 


7 


Groveland 


1 


— 


6 


- 


- 


7 


Hadley 








8 




8 


Hamilton 


25 


— 


1 


- 


- 


26 


Hampden 


— 


— 


— 


9 


- 


9 


u Hanover 


6 


— 


- 


• 


- 


6 


Hanson 


6 


— 


— 


- 


- 


6 


• 


1 


4 











J 37 





















































• - • 











( 



Hardwick 


BOSTON 

1 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 

4 


WORCESTER 
10 


TOTAL 
15 


Harvard 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Harwich 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Hatfield 


4 


- 


- 


7 


- 


11 


Haverhill 


15 


- 


433 


- 


- 


448 


Hingham 


17 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Hoi brook 


49 


- 


- 


- 


- 


49 


Holden 


- 


- 


- 


- 


73 


73 


Holland 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Holliston 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Hoi yoke 


11 


- 


- 


290 


- 


301 


Hopedale 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


5; 


Hopkinton 


1 


- 


- 


- 


3 


4 


Hudson 


40 


- 


1 


- 


22 


63 


Hull 


49 


- 


MB 


- 


- 


49 


Huntington 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Ipswich 


29 




. 


_ 


mm 


29 


Lake vi lie 


1 








— 


1 


Lancaster 


37 


— 


- 


- 


70 


107 


Lawrence 


47 


— 


2,520 


12 


- 


2,579 


Leicester 


- 


- 


- 


- 


77 


77 


Lenox 


1 


— 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Leoiainster 


2 


— 


- 


- 


37 


39 


Lexington 


130 


n 


- 


- 


- 


130 


Lincoln 


26 


— 


- 


- 


- 


26 


Littleton 


16 


- 


4 


- 


- 


20 


Longmeadow 


— 


- 


- 


61 


- 


61 


Lowell 


33 


- 


1,601 


- 


- 


1,634 


Ludlow 


17 


- 


- 


131 


- 


148 


Lunenburg 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Lynn 


341 


- 


11 


- 


- 


352 


Lynnf ield 


5 


• 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Maiden 


223 










223 


Manchester 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Mansfield 


16 


1 


m 


— 


- 


17 


Marble he ad 


40 


- 


1 


- 


- 


41 


Marion 


3 


— 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Marlborough 


20 


- 


— 


— 


22 


42 


Marshf ield 


49 


— 


— 


- 


- 


49 


Mattapoisett 


7 


— 


— 


— 


- 


7 


Maynard 


31 


— 


— 


- 


■j 


31 


Me df ield 


3 


— 


m 


— 


■m 


3 


Medford 


343 


- 


— 


• 


- 


343 


Med way 


12 


— 


— 


— 


- 


12 


Melrose 


89 


— 


3 


m 


- 


92 


Merrimac 


2 


m 


5 


- 


- 


7 


Methuen 


5 


m 


419 


— 


3 


427 


) Middleborough 


9 


9 


m 


- 


- 


18 


Middleton 


3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


Milford 


4 


• 


• 


— 


112 


116 

















IMS 



( 












Millbury 


BOSTON 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 
49 


J 

TOTAL 
49 


Millis 


13 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13 


Milton 


76 


2 


- 


- 


- 


78 


Monson 


- 


- 


- 


5 


- 


5 


Montague 


- 


- 


- 


5 


- 


5 


Monterey 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Nahant 


10 




. 




— 


10 


Nantucket 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Natick 


199 


- 


- 


- 


- 


199 


Needham 


53 


- 


- 


- 


- 


53 


New Bedford 


39 


1,123 


3 


- 


- 


1,165 


New Braintree 


- 


- 


tB 


- 


3 


3 


New Marlborough 


— 


- 


*• 


2 


- 


2 


Newbury 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


3 


Newburyport 


9 


— 


6 


- 


- 


15 


Newton 


716 


- 


- 


- 


- 


716 


North Adams 


6 


- 


- 


6 


1 


13 


North Andover 


m 


- 


117 


- 


- 


117 


North Attleborough 


9 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


9 


North Reading 


8 


- 


7 


- 


- 


15 


Northampton 


2 


- 


m 


38 


- 


40 


Nor thbo rough 


2 


• 


- 


- 


46 


48 


Northbridge 


5 


m 


- 


- 


31 


36 


Norton 


5 


9 


- 


- 


- 


14 


Norwell 


3 


- 


m 


- 


- 


3 


Norwood 


139 


• 


m 


- 


2 


141 


Oakham 










3 


3 


Orange 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


Orleans 


3 


3 


• 


- 


• 


6 


Oxford 


- 


• 


m 


- 


47 


47 


Palmer 








33 




33 


Pax ton 


- 


m 


• 


- 


37 


37 


Pe abody 


133 


— 


9 


m 


- 


142 


Pembroke 


30 


— 


• 


- 


- 


30 


Pepperell 


1 


_ 


3 


• 


- 


4 


Pittsfield 


18 


M 


a* 


21 


— 


45 


Plainville 


4 


- 


m 


— 


- 


4 


Plymouth 


16 


- 


m 


- 


- 


16 


Plympton 


2 


— 


— 


m 


— 


2 


Quincy 


366 




6 






372 


Randolph 


36 










36 


Raynham 


7 


9 


— 


m 


m 


16 


Reading 


48 


— 


1 


— 


- 


49 


Re ho both 


1 


3 


• 


■ 


— 


4 


i 'eve re 


190 


2 


2 


■ 


— 


194 


Rochester 


1 


■ 


— 


— 


— 


1 

















J 3<) 







. 





























































- 













Rockland 


BOSTON 
21 


FALL 
RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRING- 
FIELD 


WORCESTER 


J 

TOTAL 
21 


Rockport 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Russell 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Rutland 


- 


- 


- 


- 


30 


30 


Salem 


108 


. 


8 






116 


Salisbury 


- 


- 


8 


- 


- 


8 


Sandwich 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Saugus 


68 


- 


- 


- 


- 


68 


Scituate 


73 


- 


- 


- 


- 


73 


Seekonk 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Sharon 


17 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


She r born 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Shirley 


3 


- 


- 


- 


1 


4 


Shrewsbury 


1 


- 


- 


- 


214 


215 


Somerset 


2 


115 


- 


- 


- 


117 


Somerville 


787 


- 


- 


- 


- 


787 


South Had ley 


- 


- 


- 


43 


- 


43 


Southampton 


- 


- 


- 


9 


- 


9 


Southborough 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Southbridge 


7 


«i 


m 


- 


122 


129 


Southwick 


- 


- 


- 


17 


- 


17 


Spencer 


9 


- 


- 


- 


53 


62 


Springfield 


10 


- 


2 


1,944 


7 


1,963 


Stockbridge 


- 


- 


— 


1 


- 


1 


Stoneham 


59 


• 


- 


- 


- 


59 


Stoughton 


45 


3 


1 


M 


- 


49 


Stow 


2 


M 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Sturbridge 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15 


15 


Sudbury 


15 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15 


Sutton 


- 


— 


— 


- 


14 


14 


Swampscott 


37 


- 


- 


- 


- 


37 


Swansea 


2 


75 


• 


- 


- 


77 


Taunton 


30 


80 






. 


110 


Temple ton 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Tewksbury 


19 


- 


19 


- 


- 


38 


Topsf ield 


2 


— 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Tyngsborough 


- 


- 


13 


- 


- 


13 


Upton 




■■ 






2 


2 


Ux bridge 


3 


• 


— 


— 


33 


36 


Wakefield 


49 




5 






54 


Wales 


- 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


Walpole 


40 


- 


5 


• 


- 


45 


Walt ham 


435 


- 


1 


- 


9 


445 


Ware 


— 


• 


- 


25 


— 


25 


Ware ham 


11 


3 


— 


- 


• 


14 
























































! 




























































• 












' 



Warren 



Water town_ 

Way land 

Webster 

Wellesley^ 
Wellfleet) 
Wenham 



West Boylston 

West Bridgewater_ 
West Brookfield__ 
West Springfield^ 

We st borough 

Westfield 

Westford 



Westminster^ 

Weston 

Westport 

Westwood 

We ymou t h 

Whately 

Whi tman 

Wilbrahara 



Williamstown_ 

Wi lmington 

Wi nche ndon 

Winchester 

Winthrop 

Woburn 



Worcester^ 

Wrentham 



Yarmouth 



Out of State 



TOTAL 



BOSTON 



463 



61 



135 



25 



44 



10 



64 



29 



76 



46 



FALL 
RIVER 



30 



96 



31 



377 



23,615 



LAWRENCE 



13 



13 



SPRING 
FIELD 



WORCESTER 



141 



TOTAL 



100 



75 



4,178 



138 



5,838 



19 



143 



58 



15 



34 



53 



3,697 



3,232 



14 



5,332 



476 



61 



152 




58 



25 



15 



100 



35 



75 



22 



45 



30 



10 



64 



20 



8 



30 



77 



46 



96 



3,264 



582 



42,660 



• 

» 




















. 






I 






i<5 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



DIVISION OF THE BLIND 



ANNUAL REPORT 
1?^ 



JOHN F. MUNOOVAN 



DIRECTOR 



( 



( 






Tern Scarce 



THE COMKONWKALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Owen B. Klernan, Commissioner 

DIVISION OF THE BLIND 
John F. Mungovan, Director 



ADVISORY BOARD 



1967 Gregory Khachadoorien, Arlington 

1966 Edward J. Uaterliouse, Watertovn 

\9($ Jeorge Alivezoa, Bo3ton 

1969 Dace Moore, Braintree 

1969 Nathan L. Shapiro, Randolph 



MEDICAL ADVISOR? COMMITTEE 

Dr. Henry F. Allen, Boston 
Dr. Virgil Q. Casten, Boston 
Dr. Francis D'Ambrosio, Boston 
Dr. Frederick L. Landrigan, Boston 
Dr. John A. c'ovrn, Jr., Boston 
Dr. Janes J. Regan, Boston 
Dr. Earl S. Seale, Boston 
Dr. Albert ". ^loane, Boston 
Janet L. Gorton, Secretary 



MEMBERS OF STAFF 

■ »■ II M il II ■■ 

Mary F. Callero, Supervisor, Hone Teachers 

George T. Curtin, Supervisor, Individual Services 

v dward F. Durgin, Supervisor, Industries 

Ethel M. Fredrick, Supervisor, Adults 

Christine A. McLaughlin, Supervisor, Medical Care 

Frederick D. ureehan, Supervisor, Vocational Rehabilitation 

Mary E. McLaughlin, Supervisor, Children 

Michael L. Sullivan, Supervisor, Research 

Thomas 0. O'Donnell, Supervisor, In-Service Training 



( 



( 






-1- 



SUMTAHT 

Thia was the year in which President Iyndon B. Johnson declared war on 
poverty by mounting an all-out attack on America •s most virulent domestic 
The resident called for the total social, political, educational, and economic 
enfranchisement of all Americans, stressing the vital importance of a sound state 
of health, education, and welfare for the American people as being the country's 
moat treasured assets* On the local level, the ferment of urban renewal 
activities in Boston, the question of racial imbalance in the Boston and 
Springfield school systems, the report of the Massachusetts Crime Commission, 
and finally the Harrington-Willis Education Study Commission Report all combined 
to provide a lively year in the affairs of local government and social welfi 



J 11 



In the area of services and programs for the blind, the year was marked by 
innovation, activity, and, to a degree, controversy. An unexpected epidemic of 
German Measles was a serious source of concern among people engaged in work with 
the blind. Due to the epidemic, it was feared that the rate of incidence of 
blindness in small children might reverse its downward trend. Happily, no 
evidence to that fact has as yet been brought to light to substantiate this fear 
and there are no existing statistics to Indicate any widespread prevalence of 
blindness and deafness due to Rubella* f\ 

Daring the past year, the Catholic Guild for All the Blind closed its 
residential home for the aging blind at St. Raphael's in Newton and converted 
the premises into a Rehabilitation Center for the aging blind. The center 
provides adjustment and mobility training aimed at lightening the daily burdens 
of aging blind persons. This new service for blind persons is being so enthusias- 
tically received that, at the time of this writing, there is a list of p e r so n s 
waiting to enter St. Raphael's for training. The Women's Educational and 
Industrial Union, a local organisation with a long history of work with the blind, 
is cooperating with the Division in helping older blind persons who wish to live 
in private homes, find suitable locations at which to reside. The Union was a 
driving force be iind the creation of the Commieaion for the Blind which was 
Inaugurated in 1906 and is a direct precursor of the present Division of the Blind. 

An event worthy of note was the rising up of agencies for the blind and 
particularly blind persons themselves, through the Associated Blind of Kansa.iro setts, 
to protest the prevalence of begging by blind persons on the streets of Boston. 
This concerted protest to the begging was aired over local radio stations during 
"talk programs 1 ' and resulted in the Boston Police Department taking a more 
militant stand on the problem and the assignment of a detective specialist n" in 
this area of police work with instructions to coordinate his work with the 
Division of the Blind. As the year came to a close, the prevalence of begging on 
the streets of Boston has significantly decreased. 

In the highly sensitive area of fund-raising for the blind, much discussion 
was spawned as a result of a promotional campaign embarked upon by the American 
Foundation for the tOind for the purpose of raising funds for the benefit of the 
blind. The fund-raising drive waa organised and put into operation without prior 
consultation with agencies engaged in work with the blind in Massachusetts. The 
drive, using as a slogsn, The Donna Fund, was tied to a week-long promotion over 
one of the local radio stations. The central focus of the operation was an 
attractive and personable young blind girl, named Donna. The American Foundation 

^1 Table 13, appendix A 



J 1 

-2- 

for the Blind exploiting the emotional tones of the promotion, flooded the 
Metropolitan area of Boston with an appeal letter containing all the sympathy- 
provoking phrases that could be mistered into one letter. The appeal letter 
was signed by a local orofessional baseball player, who had recently become 
known to radio circles through the release of a teenage lament record* 

The agencies for the blind in the Commonwealth gave official notice of their 
opposition to this type of sympathy appeal to the American Foundation for the 
Blind by informing the national organisation in writing to that effect. Ignoring 
this protest, the Foundation, in fact, expressed its intention of continuing the 
fund-raising drive, the objections of the local agencies notwithstanding. At 
this juncture, the Advisory Board of the Division of the Blind voted to request 
the office of the Attorney-General to hand down an opinion as to whether the 
American Foundation for the Blind was in violation of the Massachusetts fund- 
raising for the blind statute /2 since it had failed to make application to the 
Division of the Blind for a license to raise funds. The question raised was, 
did the American Foundation for the Blind violate the terms of this statute in 
raising funds within the Commonwealth without first obtaining a license from the 
Division of the Blind. The Attorney-deoaral in rendering his opinion clearly 
indicated that the American Foundation for the Blind in this instanee, did come 
within the purview of the licensing statute and that the conduct by the foundation 
of the n onna Fund Appeal was in fact operating in violation of the law in that 
the enterprise was not licensed by the Division of the Blind. 

In a direct cause and effect relationship, this controversy saw a division 
of opinion arise among the several state agencies serving the blind} the Boston 
Aid to the Blind, the Massachusetts Association for the Adult Blind, and Perkins 
School for the Blind lined up on the side of the American Foundation in support 
of the unlicensed fund-raising, notwithstanding their earlier expression of 
disapproval of this fund appeal. The Protestant Ouildforthe Blind assumed a 
posture of neutrality in the controversy, while the Catholic Ouild for All the 
Blind, the Division of the Bjind, and the Associated Blind of Massachusetts 
registered violent objections to this type of emotionally-charged fund raising, 
which, in order to serve its purposes, hold* up blind persons as objects of pity 
and oillers of helplessness. This unfortunate occurrence had serious consequences 
in terms of the good relationship ax>ng the agencies for the blind, which, up 
to this point., were notable for their close cooperation in preventing overlapping, 
duplication, ?nd undue competition which are conditions frequently found in 
inter-agency relations in other parts of the country. It is honed that the 
divided agencies will, once again, join fcrces nnd restore that spirit of mutual 
cooperation with but one purpose in mind, that of providing the bent services 
for blind persons in the state In the most dignified manner possible. 

STAFF 

Inordinate complexities in the processing of personnel papers by the Division 
of Civil Service and the Commission on Administration and Finance have served 
materially to hamper the Division's efforts towards maintaining a full staff 
complement. Lon^ periods of time are permitted to elapse between the application 
for and the approval of Division staff replacements both professional and clerical. 
This situation remits in lonp; periods of under-staffing through un-filled 
positions and wreaks havoc with the need to carry out normal agency functions. 
Tnl;- the extraordinary dedication to duty and the professional responsibility of 
the present staff has permitted the agency to meet the ever-increasing demands 
for services to blind people and to carry out its administrative responsibilities. 

[2 Section 2£A,B,C,D,E of Chapter 69, Mass. General Laws 



146 

-3- 



A "Morning Report" system, introduced by the new Comralsrioncr of Administration 
and Finance, is desii^jed to record absences and tardiness of employees on a weekly 
basis. The morning report contains data on mari-diya of absences, tardiness, 
the number of persons present for duty, tho number of positions filled, and the 
of vacancies existing. These reports, completed by authorised persona, 
transmitted to n tabulating center on Mark Sensing Hollerith Cards for 
processing analysis. 

On June 7th of this year, a Kr. "oore, an industrialist, and a Mr. Saltonstall, 
a banker, both ambers of a Citizen Task Force, visited the Division to discuss 
agency operations. The two gentlemen spent several hours with the Director, 
discussing services and programs, staffing, and the Division budget together with 
related problems. The Citizen Task I'orce is an investigatory unit created by 
Governor 7olpe to examine the efficiency of state department operations and to 
make reooieaendations for improvements when warranted. As of this date, no report 
of tho conference has been received by the Director. A system of Quality Control 
in Aid to the Blind eligibility and cia work services has been institute :d and is 
functioning rather smoothly. It has already been successful enough to indicate 
several areas of uncertainty in the part of staff in Aid to the Blind policy so 
that the Division In«^ervice Training Supervisor was able ins; ely to focus 

in-service training in those areas of policy which need clarification and 
reinforcement. 

Much interest was evoked throughout the state by the enactment by the 
legislature and the signing into law by Governor Yolpe of a bill to require 
minimum educational requirements for social work staff administering public assistance 
programs of which our program of Aid to the Blind is one* This new statute will 
do much to increase the quality of services to recipients of public assistance 
throughout the state and it represents a most ' ositive step towards achieving 
the goal of service to public assistance recipients enunciated by 'resident 
Kennedy in his 1962 amendments to the Social Tecurity Act. /3 

The microfilming of closed records and a system under which closed records 
of future years will be microfilmed wa3 established by the Division. All records 
up to and incl\ ding 1962 have already been microfilmed . At the same time a 
retrieval system has been introduced whereby the use of Hollerith Cards and a 
computer tape, the index to closed records may be up-dated each year. This is a 
modern system of record-keeping which U3es a computor to interfile and up-date 
the index book each year. 

•• " •" • •• • •• it nog 

This was a most significant year in the history of the Bureau of 
Rehabilitation. For the first time since tho inception of the Vocational 
Rehabilitation Bureau as a unit in the Division of the Blind, the total nn«bor of 
blind and visually handicapped persons rehabilitated, retrained and placed in 
gainful employment exceeded the one hundred mark. The true value of this jut- 
•tanding accomplishment can be truly appreciated only if one realizes the 
eeriousnen3 of the increasing e.icrcac' raont of automation and cybernetics on 
r*al employment opportunities. 



[} Chapter £80 of the Acts of 1965 



I 



I 



-ii- 



L5GI3LATI0B 



The current session of tr*e Massachusetts ^gisleturu has had under consideration 
several petitions dealing with previa! i for the expansion and inprovonont of 
services and pro^runs for blind and visually handicap, ed residents of the Coomoo- 
wealth. T'nacted by tho legislature and signed into law by the iovernor was a bill 
providing legal safeguards needed to prevent discrimination against otherwise 
qualified blind perrons who apply for teaching positions in state colleges and 
at the state university */k Presently under deliberation by tho House Committee on 
"ays and Means la a bill which provides for a t-iare comprehensive defining of the 
words and phrases and for a substantial broadening of the provisiouj contained 
in the existing statute authorising the placing of verging stands operated by 
blind persons in public buildings and on public property* This bill has already 
recei roval from the Joint Legislative Committee on Volic "Welfare. It 
had previously boon submitted as part of the Division Annual He port for l#u # /$ 

Tlae Associated Blind of Massachusetts, through its legislative agent, Mr. 
Charles Yttle, filed a petition to authorize an increase in the iten in the budget 
of recipients of Aid to the Blind icnown as "Incidental Expenses Arisine from 
Blindness" from the present SluOO per month to $£ # 00 [^r aont] . The bill which 
received prior approval from the Joint Cow&ttee on Public Welfare la now under 
consideration by the House Coireiittee on Ways and Means. /6 

CE.^I OF 3LINDHKSS 

| A total of 2,01*3 certificates of blindness were issued by the Division 
* during the past fiscal year. Of this total, 838 were requested to support 

applications for exemption of real estate taxes j 9hS for state and federal income 
-ions with 260 being requested for uiiscellaneous purposes. 






AID TO ?•■ P-," 

Aid to the Blind Is a program of public assistance governed by Title 10 of 
the Social rity Act and Section 23, Chapter 69 of the Massachusetts General 

Laws. This assistance is based upon need of the blind individual, It is not 
a compensation for the lack of vision. During the fiscal year 1?65, 27^ oifferent 
individuals received assistance for all or part of the ye. r. on June 30, 1#$ 
there vfcre 2216 persons in receipt of Aid to tiie Blind. Added to the rolls 
during the year were 226 individuals, wldlo XI i^rsonj vara dropped from the 
rolls because of death, and 201 persons were dropped from the rolls for other 
reasons. 

A total of 1£6 persons applied for Aid to the Blind during t x, and of 

these I166 applicants, 372 were accepted and ap roved for grants of assistance. 

e ?h persons who were denied assistance or witiidrew applications were those who 
misunderstood the program and thought it was a compensation for loss of vision 
benefit, those whose vision was greater tiian "legal" blindness, and those whose 
income or bank accounts exceeded the income and reserve amounts permitted under 
Aid to the "*lind regulations. 

Chapter 132 of the Acts of 196$ 
House No. 2218 
House No. 2219 






( 



( 



f *Q 



Orest efforts mn mads to redr-ce naner and desk work of Aid to the "aird 
ease workers so that they could devote more t. ? me to services to clients. For 
example, ne established a mractics that all recipients who are patients in nursing 
homss would become service clients and • ;onscouer.tly arranged to visit them at 
least once every three months to cneck on their needs and their prepress in the 
nursing home, v.e ^rent considerable tine working out an arrangement with 
St. Raphael 1 « debilitation Center for the Aging Blind and the Women's Educational 
and Industrial Union whereby we could find housing arrangements for elderly blind 
oeople who with the help of the Division's social case work staff and rehabilitation 
center training could move out of nursing hones and other institutional arrangements 
and into more active nlaces in the community where their care wtIu be leas costly 
and in which they would be enabled to live more indenendently. 



coat, of Aid to the Blind increased during the year despite a ratter small 
increase in the number of recipients. This Increase was due mostly to the 
increase In the cost of hospital care, nursing home care, the visiting nurse care, 
and other medical services to recipients* 

A system of Quality Control of case actions in Aid to the Blind resulted in 
a reoheck of eligibility determination and the services provided to a scientifically 
selected sample of applicants and recloients of Aid to the Blind whose aid was 
denied, discontinued or who were granted Aid during the year* A sample of 55 
positive actions was selected and a sample of 65 negative actions was selected to 
be studied. In each oositive action, a desk review was made by the Supervisor of 
Individual Services and the recipient was also visited in his home. Tn negative 
action samples, an office review was made* There were no negative actions of 
the type whicp indicated the need for a horns visit. During the next year, the 
sample is to be doubled and in the case of negative actions the sample is to be 
selected from all negative actions other than closings due to death of the 
recipient. This will mean that all negative actions will be included in Quality 
Control, since the closings by death amount to 70 percent of cases closed in the 
12 months ending June 30, 1965. The Cuallty Control system has not revealed the 
need for any mac or policy or systems change, but it has been a useful tool to 
indicate the are-s which need emohasis in our in-service training prograr . T n- 
service training, Quality Control, and ease work supervision have coordinated 
remarkably well towards a more efficient administration of Aid to the Blind which 
b e c o mes increasingly sensitive to the rysmds of blind neoole. 

TAMING BOOK PROGRAM 

The Talking Book Program is now in its 31st vsar of service to blind persona. 
The program is conducted under the Jurisdiction of the United States (knrernment, 
the Library of Congress. The record plarers, or Talking Book Mac ines, are 
nrovided und^r lease to legally blind persons by the Mbrary of Con<*ress through 
the Division of the Blind. The Talking Books, or long-playing reeorda, are 
maintained In the local regional librarv located at Watertown, Massachusetts. 
This service is availabls to any resident of Massachusetta who has been c*~tmed 
as legally blind \rr an eye physician and is so registered with the Divis^ J the 
Blind. The Talking 3ook reader will find the choice of available books to he 
«*t*msive» There are more than three thousand different titles, ranging from 
standard fiction to the classics and the Bible, "Talking Book Topics" published 



c 



; l 



« 41 

-6- 



bimonthly keeps the blind reader advised about now books read/ for 11 . i-'ng 
the past year UbO new readers were introduced to this popular service* In our 
efforts to provide maximum service to the readers 210 machines found to be 
outmoded or in a state of serious disre air were replaced with new ones* 
Permanent removal of 329 Machines was completed because the readers had roved 
out of the state, liad vision restored, had died, or for some other reason did not 
need the Talking Book Machine any lonper. The inventory of Talking Book Machines 
on hand or in use on June 30, 1965 numbered 26 oO. The Library of Con«-re;jy is 
constantly trying to improve the Talking Book services for blind persons ai*i is 
trying to devise ways of producing lighter or less bulky mass of r<*c rds on which 
to record the book and have now started to record sons books on 8 l/3 speed in 
addition to the recordings of 33 1/3 and 16 2/3 speed e. The Library of Congress 
is also experimenting with compressed speech so that in the future it might be 
able to wake reading by sound laethods faster for blind persons* The region- 
library for the storage and distribution of the Talking Book records for 
Massachusetts liad a certain degree of disruption of services due to extensive 
repair work and ruinovations to tl*e building with the consequent suspension of 
telephone services for a period of time* Ve still continue to be helped by the 
Telephone Pioneers In repairing and servicing Talking Book Machines which are 
in need of repair* All machines in use now ere at least two speeds, that is, 
33 1/3 and 16 2/3 machines, so that this type of machine is now available to 
evexjy person* Very few machines are available which will play at a speed o£ 
8 1/3 and these are available largely to children in school. 

■ ?-y ■ ' " -ft 

During the last year, innaervice training was provided for all newly appointed 
staff members* orientation programs were arranged for new social workers, social 
work trainees, and clerical staff* The programs included general knowledge as to 
the Division * s purpose, policies, and philosophy* In addition, the groups were 
oriented to their respective roles and functions within the structure of the 
Division . 

Training, of an on-going nature, for experienced workers, was held during the 
year on a semiHwonthly basis. For this puroose, each worker was assigned to one 
of tliree smaller groups, depending upon education and experience. The Fall 
Series of meetings focused on the Aid to the Blind Manual, with particular 
emphasis ont recent chaiu^es in policyj a general review of standards of 
assistance | and the use of the manual as a positive casework tool in helping 
clients cops with uheir financial problems* The Winter Series centered on the 
development and use of the initial social study, in terms oft appropriate and 
meaningful content j formulation of a sound diatjvosis of the problems; and lastly, 
the setting of realistic goals in helping clients. .as 

directed toward the multiple needs of older clients. Emphasis was placed upont 
assessment oa the older person's total needs j the evaluation of current living 
arrangements in view of their needs j and referral to an appropriate source for 
rehabilitation, if indicated. This last series developed as a result of three 
forces, namely, the fact that over ^0 percent of our clientele are 6 or overj the 
establishment in the com-nunity of a new rehabilitation center for older bli 
nersons| end the initiating of « project by a private agency feared toward 
finding suitable private homes for blind individuals, the majority of 
would be in the older age bracket. 



f 



-7- 

In March, seven staff members attended a one week institute at 
University for further study on Cultural Factors Affecting Poverty. 

In June, Mr. David Botelho returned to the Division from educational leave. 
He received his Master* e Degree in Social Work and will return to his position 
in the Cane Cod Area. 

At the present time, Miss Carol Klein is on leave of absence and completing 
her work toward a Master* s Decree in Social Vork. 



BCRKAU OF TNIX3TRIE5 

The Division naintains and operates special workshops in six of the 
larger cities of the Commonwealth, nroviding gainful employment for some UiO 
blind persons. These shops, four for men and two employing women, are engaged 
in the manufacture of several varieties of brooms, wet and dry mops, rubber 
mats, pillowcases and hand-woven products. Chair-caning and repeating service 
as well as re-etringing and repair of tenni3 raquets are also offered. Recently, 
considerable emphasis has been placed on the procuring of sub-contracts in 
assembly wor: . 

The blind persons employed in thes* special workshops found to be unable 
to compete successfully in the labor market are thus provided with an opportunity 
to become self-supporting members of th* community. 

The following report indicates receipts derived from workshop production 
during the past fiscal year together with comparable figures from the previous 
year. 



Shop 


l#3^U 


1961i-6$ 


Differential 


Total Sale a 


r ? 2Ul i9 199.9h 


?2U0, 151.51 


(fli f «ib , .l»3)e 


Cambridge 


199,789.57 


195,665.33 


(11,1214.21*) 


Pall River 


10,316.97 


10,65h.3l* 


337.37 


Lowell 


6,597.39 


6,503.22 


(88.17) 


Pittsfield 


12,U32.8U 


12,362.80 


(69.81) 


Worcester 


U,066.20 


UA8.35 


82.15 


Springfield 


10,963.17 


10,117.17 


(81*5.70) 



« Figures in parentheses indicate decrease in receipts. 



r 



-8- 



CHIIDREN'S SERVICES 

The Children's Services for the year enjoyed the full quota of workers , 
one Supervisor, three Social Workers, and one Pre -School Counselor for part of 
the year. Miss Rosvitha Micou, who had joined the staff of the Division of 
the ?lind as a Social Worker in October 1963, left the services of the 
Commonwealth in February 196 5 in order to enter graduate school of social work. 
Thus for the remainder of the year, the Children's Services were short one 
social workeq since she had not been replaced up to the end of the year. 

During the year, there have been several adolescent youngsters who had 
suddenly suffered a drastic loss of vision* This sudden loss created such a 
trauma to the emotional and personality adjustment of these young people that 
intensive casework had to be provided for them* In addition, a substantial 
amount of counseling, to both parents and to the local schools, was required in 
order to help the newly blinded adolescent to adjust to the new school situation, 

There was substantial Interest in observing the number of children who were 
reported during the year having Congenital Cataracts due to Rubella. This 
interest was created by the recent epidemic of German Measles. Eight children 
with Congenital Cataracts due to Rubella, were reported during the year, a 
•nailer figure than some people had anticipated. 



In June, members oX the Children's staff participated in a panel in connection 
with the Boston University Institute for Teachers for Visually Handicapped Children. 
This Institute was conducted under joint sponsorship of the Massachusetts Society 
for the Prevention of Blindness, the National Society for the Prevention of 
Blindness, and Boston University. Miss Mary FicLaughlin, Supervisor of Children's 
Services, shared the panel, Mrs, Kills, the fre-School Counselor and Mrs. Davidson, 
Social Worker in the Children's Services Bureau, topether with }*r 9 Robert Scott, 
Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, and tfr. iiungovan, the Director, provided s 
seminar for an entire afternoon during this institute. The response to the seminar 
was vary i'avorable. 

In October 1961i the Girl Scout organization had become interested in creating 
in the Girl Scouts an awareness of the problems of young blind people and the 
possibilities of community services in helping young blind people. To this end, 
Mrs, Ellis, our °re-School Counselor, met with groups from three of the Girl Scout 
Councils and described to them the number of young blind children, certain 
problems that young blind children had, how the Girl Scouts might be of service to 
them. The girls wanted to do something constructive and educational for the 
benefit of blind children. In these talks, Mrs, Ellis instructed the leaders on 
how to make boxes of assorted objects, alphabet books, things that match, rhyming 
objects, those that pertain to nature, numbers concept books, and factual story 
books. These are very helpful in preparing blind children for group experience, 
learning to read, and in teaching them to become more fully aware of the world 
around them, which is beyond the tips of their fingers. Some of the Girl Scouts 
are in the process of making Touch and See % the reading readiness book for blind 
children. Because a number of deaf -blind, pre-echool children were referred to 
us, Mrs. Wagner of the American Foundation for the Blind, came to Boston and visited 
some of the children with Mrs. Ellis. She gave suggestions in handling these 
children. Mrs. Ellis also visited the deaf-blind department of the °erkins School 
for the Blind to observe children in the program of Instruction there, in order to 
help her to be of help to the parents of deaf-blind children who were at home. 



i 






*\ 



Two of the social workers attended the Institute for Employed Social '..orken 
at the noston t niversity School of Social Work in March* Hiss Catherine W* 
Williams continued her splendid voluntary reading of text books on recording 
machines. These recordings are sent over to the Cambrldfi workshop and 
transcribed into Braille by Mr* Tloyd McLaurhlin, for the use of public school 
children, Durinr the year, Miss Williams also transcribed a Bible study course 
and Manual of Services for the use of nenbern of the congregation of a church in 
Roxbury* 

The greatest single cause of blindness in 77U school age children in the 
Commonwealth was Retrolental Fibroplasia, which accounted for 301 of the 77b 
school af!* children. Congenital Cataracts was the cause of blindness in 8h 
instances with Optic Nerve Atrophy accounting for 61 j Nystagmus 56} Albinism lrff 
Kyopia 39« All other causes of bllndnocs in school age children were fairly 
well scattered with no particular grouping* Jt 

The 77U are children of school age and were located as follows! 169 were in 
the residential school for the blind (°erkins)i 328 were in regular coununity 
schools throughout the State} and 162 were resident in schools for the mentally 
retarded* The remainder were in a variety of living and school arrangements* ^2 
There were 120 children of pre-school ace on the Massachusetts Register in June 
o : this year, and of these 120 pre-school children, 2k were blind because of Optic 
Nerve Atrophy) 18 because of Congenital Cataracts} Ik Retrolental Fibroplasia} and 
the rest were blind because of various affections* /3 Eighty-two children wear* 
adde i to the Register of the Blind this year* The causes of blindness in those 
newly registered blind children were as follows : Congenital Cataracts 16, of which 
8 were reported as caused by Rubella} 11 Ontic Nerve Atrophy, 3 of which were reported 
to have been caused by brain tumor} ffostafsaus 11} Albinism 9} Iridia 5} 
Hydronhthalsos (Congenital Glaucoma) It} Retrolental Fibroplasia 3} and the other 
for scattered affections. There were a few less children in Perkins Scliool for 
the Blind this year, 169 compared with 17f of last year) and a few more in the 
community schools, 338 compared to 328 of last year} and a few less in the schools 
for the retarded (State) 162 this year compereo' to 167 of last year, /h 



It is hoped that we will have success in recruiting a competent case worker 
to replace Miss Kicou. 

HOME y:AC : HHG 

During the past year we have been fortunate to have all ten hone teaching 
positions filled. All ten Horae Teachers have been certified as qualified Home 
Teachers by the American Association of Workers for the Blind. 

In this period, two Home Tsachers attended the national meeting of the 
American Association of Marker* "or thr n lind* Four Home Teachers and the 
ftipervisor attended the Eastern Conference of Home Teachers held in New York City 
in October of 196U* Three of the Home Teachers participated in the prograt: of 
the Conference and the Supervisor is Treasurer of the organisation. The .Supervisor 
of name Tsachers attended two meetings of the Committee of Supervisor of II 



* 



Table 7* Appendix A h Table 1 ), Appendix A 

Table 8, Appendix A £ Table 13, Appendix A 



*> 




-10- 

leachers on the r astern Seaboard and two meetings of the Executive Board of the 
".astern Conference of Home Teachers* Two Hone Teachers a- Lied themselves of a 
offered at Boston University School off Jecial Work in the spring of this 
As in oast years, we had weekly in-service training meetings charing the 
months when case loads drop off. Monthly meetings were held during the 
winter F«onthe, 

In all, the Home Teachers visited about lhOO individuals during the past 
year* tfost of the individuals were visited several times throughout the year 
with a ? ovular olanned educational goal. Several, however, were visited only 
once to explain the Division services. At this time most individuals reentered 
within the fiscal year axe contacted by Home Teachers and offered a visit to 
explain our services. In some instances this explanati r>r. is done* B the telephone 
and the person says that he docs not need a visit. Many of the nevl^ registered 
persons, however, do prefer to have a visit from a teacher who will then explain 
our services full J . In 'aany instances this leads to follow-up visits and a 
regular teaching plan. Persons vere visited in a wide variety of environmental 
settings. Some persons were visited in their own homes, in nursing homss, in 
hospitals, state prisons, offices, and other places of employment. 

Many ctiwr parsons received lessons at the Division offices to give them a 
goal towards which to travel in an effort to help maintain their mobility. 
Mostly the Home Teachers work with adults iron age 18 to the nineties. During 
the summer months, however, eone hifh school students have been seen for helo 
with Braille orior to the coming school year, 

Hsrsone visited can roughly be divided into four irrouns, for the most parti 
(1) Sewly registered individuals who just want a personal contact with the of lice 
and have the various services described to they can choose one or more services 
now or later. (2) Elderly persons who have attained their marl nam level of 
adjustment but feel the need of an occasional contact with someone from th±3 office 
sc that they will be assured of our continued interest in their welfare, and 
brought up to date on services currently available from the Division. (3) Larsons 
of all a^es who are pi Immlllj interested in help with leisure time activities 
(handcrafts, minimum Braille instruction to enable them to olsv cards, otc. and 
introduction to various social activities in their communities.) (U) Individuals 
who are newly blind and require case work service to help them in their adjustment 
within their own homes and immediate environment. These are individuals who, while 
not employable by reason of age or other dlMfcllltj, eta be helped to lead a fuller 
and much more Independent life by learning to move more freely about their homss f 
by being helped to take care of their personal needs, and by being shown how to 
help with household chores including cooking. (5) Newly blind adults who can 
reasonably be as Tried to be employable. It is this group that requires the 
greatest proportion of the Home Teacher '3 tiwe although it does not represent the 
largest percentage of the case load. The rlome Teacher and the Rehabilitation 
Counselor work closely with these IndttVtdumls* In some instances, the 'feme 
Teacher carries the major responsibility initially and then refers the individual 
to the Rehabilitation C'-unaelor when he is adjusted to the point where he can 
participate in a work plan. In other cases the Rehabilitation Counselor refers 
the individual to the Home Teacher for specialised help in a particular area to 
help the person continue on the Job or to equip him to handle a new job. 



< 



* 



* 



154 

-li- 



individuals are visited twice weekly, some weekly, some every two weeks , 
and some monthly, depend} n*r "oon their needs and goals* They are ^iven instructions 
in Braille, handcrafts, techniques of daily living, grooming, script writing, 
communications skills, etc. Some are visited for a oeriod of several nonths and 
some for a ywrioH of several years depending upon their needs and rate or nrogress. 

^OCATTOFAL WTOABTT.TT'l.rPOll BUREAU 



t Vocational Rehabilitation %ireau consnleted its thirteenth ftll yetr cr. 
June 30, 1 'dth a professional staff of line persons^ the supervisor, and eight 

counselors. Five counselors do general counseling arr 1 -»n J • two 

counselors work on the development of o« vending stand programf and one counselor 
concentrates on the day-to-day operation of the vending stands. 

As a definition, ws may say that Vocational Rehabilitation is a service 
designed to develop, preserve or restore the ability of blind men and women to 
work for pay. In this program, no blind person is considered rehabilitated until 
he has been placed in suitable employment for at least thirty days on a job which 

neare to be ■ t. T T.ally, rehabilitation involves successful placement 

in paid ee but, In seme cases, it may involve the ability to perform the 

Important ;£ home ciak . The services which are provided under thi3 prograai 

are gear: ' -ecific needs of the in- a*lj with due regard to the nature 

of his disability, his interests and altitudes and vocational goals. Services 
are riven to individuals !*ho are at least fourteen years of age and who have a 
re Asonablc chance of beinc employed after services are piven«~ There are nine 
services In alii (1) medical diarnostic service* J (2) individual ouneeliiu? 
and faidar '., luding ;;jyc 3 >*lp select the ri ob) 

(3) medical, surgical, psychiatric and hosoital service j (/j) artificial linbe and 
other pvoethetic ..ppliancea; (£) training j (6) maintenance and tranaper- m) 
(7) tool3, eeriinmrnt, or lioenses} (8) Job placement! (9) Job follow-up, 

Follovins are statistics which <»ive a brief picture of the work done during 
the yeari 

ii Referrals ? 

1. On lumd July 1 103 

2. Hew during the year 211 

3. Total referrals remaining at 

end of period 90 

B. Active Cases i 

1. Active cages on hand July 1 ....... 357 

2. Accepted for service during 158 

the year 

3. "!btal active coses remaining 

at end of the neriod ••..,..••••. 379 

C. Clients Rehabilitated t 

Cases closed rehabilitated (as cooparod 

with 85 in fiscal 196k) 103 



-12- 



15) 



> 



The Bureau showed en increase of 20% in rehabilitations over 196h and 
achieved the goal of 100 or more rehabilitations for the . tin* in its 

histor . 

Fifty-six clients wen) training in ecllog* during the year under our 
Vocat'orial 'V'labilitation program, ten of I raduate Irtiaimi and foi-c>- 

in undergraduate schools. Last year, vc had forty-five college clients, and we 
anticipate that we will have over sixty watt year* During utt year, eight clients 
who had completed their college training found employment in line with their 
major o Actives. All blind persons vrho are interested in attending collegB 
rnibnlt applications which are reviewed by the College Advisory Boarc of t.i3 
Division, Ma college program sponsored by the Division, unclerryaduate 

studentc are expected to attend a college within the staU . 

Following is a list of the thirty colleges attended by our blind students 
and the number of students in each college* 



Co: 

American International 

Amherst 

Sanson 

Bostoi; Lniverjity 
Srandeis 

port 
I rown 
Clark 
Columbia 
Eastern Nazarene 
Harvard 
Holy Cross 

Tasell Junior College 
Le*vll State College 
Merrimack 

!ft. Ida Junior College 
Bewton Junior College 
Princeton 
nadcliffe 
Regis 

St* Anselr.'o 
Springfield 
Stanf or 
Stonehill 
•Suffolk 
Tufts 

I'rtLveraity of Pittsburgh 
University of Massachusetts 
William* 



Kumber ox Students 

$ 

1 

1 

3 
11 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
h 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



L56 

-13- 

Belov is a listing of the sixteen vocational objectives of those clients 
who were in college durin pact year and t>» number interested in each 
objective : 

Objective 



Bus5.ness J-iaJor 1 

Dairy Management Major 1 

Beonomist 1 

0u anee. "ovnselor 3 

Insurance Sales 1 

, j. 5 

Mathematician 2 

Music Education 3 

Physicist 3 

Programmer 1 

?syol*olopist 6 

Public a Vforker 1 

Recreation Iroup Leader 1 

Rehabilitation Counselor 1 

toalfjJ Hrtar 3 

23 



During the yeur f we opened throe nsw vending stands — an ovtcide snack bar 
serving the psnliiS in the Municipal Parking I#t next to the City Hall in Nstr 
Bedford, a snack bar serving the patients iind employees at the Soldiers Tone in 
olyoke, and a cafeteria for employees o bacy 3hoe Company in Brockton* 

Vte will open throe additional stands wit! first six months of next year ~ 

a ISjflisrla Tor employe'? of an industH " plant in " althan, a snack bar stand 
in a count ig in Boston, an-i n cafeteria for employees of an industrial 

plant in /toyman th« At the close of the yea?' we had thirty-five vending st \da 
in the State, Stand operators averaged }$ $ Ul5»Q0 in their earnings, as compared 
with their l?6l sv-rage earnings of f 5,091 .00, an increase of $381.00. rnder our 
vending ntrnc- cyrtcn, each ctmd is established *.?ith the operator an en independent 
business man who receives advice and consultation from the Piv5aion staff ts 
needed* When n&i stands are opened % such ^ob vacancies are given to existing 
operators who are inter on the basis of ability and seniorit;'. 

Heeds of tlte roiyan 

1. A new federal rehabilitation law is chie to be enacted earlyin the next 
year. Such a law would aim at a ?re t increase in the number of clients 
rehabilitated. Tn or^er to taUd an increased number of rehabilitanta, 
it would be necessary to re-construct the Vocational Rehabilitation 
IKireau so that it would have nany more supervisors, counsolors f und 
clerical workers. 

2. Cent \r attention to developments of tU physical restoration aspect 
of the prolan, A beginning has been made here but much more remains to 
be done* 



3. Continuing and increased efforts to develop rare industrial placement 
Spporti JiiU.ee for blind people. 



15? 

-il- 

DORA DONOVAN 

Miss D. was self-referred to this Bureau in June 1963. At the tins of the 
application she was a 30 year old, single girl, who lived with her parents in a 
one-family home* She was the youngest of five children. Her brothers and sisters 
had all married and established families of their own* 

Miss D. had visual problems since birth. She had been legally blind for 
most of her life, but still retained some usable sight. During the initial 
Interview she expressed much uncertainty about taking advantage of rehabilitation 
services* With the assistance of readers and the use of some large type textbooks, 
she had been able to graduate from a public high school. She then attempted 
secretarial school, but after a month or two withdrew from the course. Since that 
time she held three or four jobs but encountered difficulty and dissatisfaction 
with each. 

In successive counseling sessions the various rehabilitation services were 
explained in detail, and attempts were made to assist Miss D. to develop a feasible 
vocational objective. Since she had little idea of her job interests and aptitudes, 
she was referred to a psychologist for testing. These results indicated clerical 
skill and interest and the potential to benefit from training beyond the high 
school level. Arrangements were made for Miss D. to attend a local business college 
with the employment objective of transcription typist. Personnel at the school 
bad never worked with anyone who had a severe visual problem and although they were 
quite receptive to the idea, they needed help in general orientation and training 
techniques. This was provided and Miss D, adapted well to the school environment. 
She progressed nicely in the program and after about one year she completed the 
secretarial course* The time had arrived to locate an appropriate job opening. 
During the training she had a course in medical terminology and had developed in- 
terest in working in a hospital setting. The directors of local hospitals were 
contacted and attempts were made to sell the concept of hiring a well-trained, 
legally blind person as a medical transcriber* One of the hospital administrators 
showed considerable interest and Indicated that he had a job vacancy in the medical 
records department* Miss D. was interviewed and subsequently hired to fill the 
opening* Although initially she had some difficulty with unfamiliar medical tenet 
and with the manner in which some of the doctors dictated, she soon overcame these 
two problems and is now a satisfactory employee* 



The rehabilitation services which brought about Miss D.'s successful 
placement were guidance and counseling, psychological testing, training, job 
finding, and follow-up. 

ALBERT BAKER 

Mr. B. was a forty-nine year old man who applied for help to the Rehabilitation 
Bureau of the Massachusetts Division of the Blind in October 1963. At this time, 
he was married and had five children, the oldest of which was twelve years of age. 
He had been out of work since i960 and was receiving Aid to the Blind from this 
Division* In addition, his wife and children were receiving financial help through 
the A.P.D.C. Mr* B* had completed eight grades in school and took a number of 
evening courses through the Boston school system many years before in English and 
Social Studies. 



r 



158 

-i*- 



When talking with him, it was noted that he apoke in a very cultured and 
pleasant manner and gave evidence of possessing a good amount of potential as a 
rehabilitation candidate* He had been employed in the past as a waiter on a 
railroad for a period of ten years j a porter in a building for five years j and 
had operated his own restaurant for a period of nine years* He was not particularly 
interested in re-entering the food servicing field and instead expressed a desire 
to undertake training leading towards some type of machine shop work* With this 
purpose in mind* he was admitted to the New England Rehabilitation for Work 
Center* Boston* and after an evaluation and training period there, covering a 
span of twelve weeks* it was determined that he did possess interest and aptitude 
of a mechanical nature* He develooed skills in light machine operations and gave 
an indication that he would be able to perform such operations competitively* 

For a period of weeks following the completion of Mr* B*'s course at the 
Rehabilitation Center* efforts were made by this Bureau to secure an opening for 
him* This quest ended with an Interview being set-up for Mr* B* at a production 
machine shop operation located in Boston* Mr. B* made a very favorable impression 
at the time of his screening interview and was told to report for work after he 
underwent a physical examination by the company's doctor* When it was learned by 
the president of this particular concern that a legally blind person with very 
limited vision was to be hired, he believed that such a decision should be reversed, 
since both he and the company doctor felt sure that an injury to Mr* B. might 
result. Howev er , the plant manager insisted on Mr. B. being provided an opportunity 
to display his abilities and it is gratifying to report that Mr* B. has Just 
completed his six-month period of work. 

ihe company is very happy with the quality and production of Mr. B.«s work 
and has assured him of steady employment as long as work is available. 



r 






15!i 



APPENDIX A 
TABULAR IEFORHATIOH 
«UUCTERISTICS OF THE BUND POPULATION AND CAUSES 
INCIDBHCE OF BLXUBSS IN MASSACHUSETTS 






c 



-16- 



TABLS 1 Blind persons on the Massachusetts Register of the Blind by age 
and sex on December 31, 1961*. 



lbO 



TbtHT 

Under 5 yrs. 
5 to 19 yrs. 
20 to Ui yrs. 
1*5 to 61* yrs. 
6$ to 71* yrs. 
75 to 81* yrs. 
85 yrs. & over 
Age Unknown 



Total 


Male 


Female 


^rccnt 


91*53 (166*) 


U#> (l$.rt) 


si# (a.») 


166.6 


73 


to 


33 


0.8 


871 


1*61 


hio 


9.2 


1367 


778 


569 


lli.ii 


2113 


1102 


1011 


22.1* 


1751* 


71*7 


1007 


18.5 


1830 


710 


1120 


19.1* 


1115 


366 


71*9 


11.8 


330 


116 


2U* 


3.5 



TABLE 2 Extent of vision of 91*7 persons added to the Massachusetts Register 
of the Blind, January 1 through December 31» 196U. 



Vision 


Total 


Total 


9U7 


Absolute Blindness 


53 


Light Perception 


68 


Light Projection 


11 


Less than 5/200 
5/200 to 9/200 


177 


107 


10/200 to 19/200 


212 


20/200 


238 


Restricted Field 


55 


Extent of Vision 01 


riknovn 26 



Male 



Female 



23 

33 

5 

80 

hh 
82 
120 
27 
10 



2' 

35 

6 

97 
tj 
130 
116 
28 
16 



TABLE 3 Blind persons added to the Massachusetts Register of the Blind by age 
and sex, January 1 through December 31, 1961*. 



Age 
TotiT 



Under 5 yrs. 
5 to 19 yrs. 
20 to 1*1* yrs. 
1*5 to 61* yrs. 
65 to 71* yrs. 
75 to 81* yrs. 
85 yrs. ft. over 
Unknown 



Total 



23 
57 
90 
176 
181 
216 
100 
102 



Male 

WTHCTJT 



9 
3U 

U5 
86 
80 
95 
35 

1*0 



Female 

U* 
23 
U5 
90 
101 

123 
65 
62 



D ercent 
166.6 



2.1* 
6.0 

9.5 
18.8 

19.1 
23.0 
10.6 
10.6 



( 



-17- 



i«! 



TABLE b Causes of blindness of 821* persons added to the Massachusetts 
Register of the Blind, January 1 through December 31* 196b. 



CauiHE 


Total 


Total 


82L 


|ajHM 


109 


ftyopia 


23 


Keratitis 


8 


Cataracts 


96 


Uveitis 


21 


Retinal Degeneration 


210 


Retrolental Fibroplasia 


5 


Other Retinal Defects 


190 


Optic Nerve Atrophy 


b7 


Causa Unknown 


25 


Other Corneal Defects 


23 


Other D o«iduals 


6b 



Hale 

155- 



Female 



Vk 

8 
6 

36 

8 

88 

1 

79 
28 
10 
5 
b3 

♦ Reflects only those referrals made by 
Ophthalmologists and KENT. 



b&3 

65 
15 

13 

122 

b 
in 

19 

15 
18 
21 



TABLE 5 31ind persons added to the Massachusetts Register of the Blind by aft 
diring the 12 raontfas July l t 1959 through June 30, I960 and of those, 
the persons remaining active on June 30, 1961, June 30, 1962, 
June 30, l^c3, June 30, 196b, and June 30, 1965. 




Under 1 yr. 

1 to 2 yrs, 

2 to 3 yrs. 

3 to h yrs. 
b to 5 yrs. 
5 to 9 yrc. 
10 to lli yrs. 
15 to 1? yr<j. 
20 to 2li yr«3. 
25 to 29 3Ts. 
30 to 3b yrs. 
35 to 39 yrs. 
bO to bb yrs. 
U5 to b9 yrs. 
50 to 5b yrs. 
55 to 59 yrs. 
60 to 6U yrs. 
65 to 69 yrs. 
70 to 7b yrs. 
75 to 79 yrs. 
80 to 6b yrs. 
85 to 89 yrs. 
90 to 9)1 yrs. 
95 to 99 yrs. 
100 yra. or over 
Age Unknown 



Total I960 


1961 


1962 


1#3 


1961 


1965 


816 


6H5 


HE 


M 


53b 


188 


5 

















7 


5 














5 


5 


h 











h 


5 


h 


1 








1 


3 


$ 


9 


2 


1 


31 


2b 


21 


16 


18 


15 


19 


22 


20 


27 


27 


22 


7 


5 


9 


I 


10 


16 


9 


9 


8 


7 


6 


13 


13 


11 


8 


6 


6 


13 


12 


12 


12 


9 


10 


17 


2 


15 


12 


12 


9 


15 


13 


lb 


17 


16 


27 


u 


21 


19 


16 


lb 


s 

73 


32 


31 


25 


21 


20 


37 


31 


30 


32 


29 


8 


hh 
51 


i 


28 
51 


29 

b5 


97 


2 


6b 


k5 


b6 


b3 


89 


M 


80 


70 


56 


101 


2 


68 


60 


61 


58 


63 


66 


53 


56 


56 


28 


27 


26 


30 


3b 


26 


2 


5 


5 


7 


8 


11 




















b3 


8 


3 


1 


1 






( 



- 18 - L62 

TABLE 6 Blind persons reswved from the Heeoachusetta Itecintor of the Blind 
Iron January 1 through Dsoeaber 31, 1;*^. 



^ Total Male 
WTVm) WWR 5UT57Jn BBI 

Under 5 yrs. U -I -I ^'2 

5 to 19 yre. 51 27 2U 5.7 

20 to Wi yrs. U0 19 21 li.li 

U5 to 6U yrs, 108 6$ U3 12.0 

65 to 7fc yrs. 1# 6$ 91 17.3 

75 to 8U yrs. 2ii6 101 Ui5 27.5 

85 yrs. & over 2U8 U 159 27.5 

Age Unknown U8 21 27 5.3 

TABLE 7 Causes of blindness of 77U scliool age children born 19h7 through 1958 
on the Kassachueetts Register of the Blind on June 30, 1965* 

mm m 



Ifydrophthalroos (congenital glaucoma) 17 

Secondary glances* 1 

Kicrophthalnoa 9 

Anophthslnos 2 

Albinism hi 

Myopia 39 

Endophthalmitis X 

Nystagnus 56 

Heuropathia keratitis 1 

Corneal opacities 5 

Corneal abnormality 1 

Stipplinn of maculae 1 

Congenital cataracts (of these 3 caused by rubella) 81 \ 
Dislocated 
Iridocyclitis 
Uveitis 

Chorioretinitis 10 

Choridal degeneration 2 

Choroidltia 1 

Sympathetic ophthalmia 1 

Aniridis lii 

Coloboraa iris, retina choroid 1* 

Retinopathy (one of these caused by diabetes) 2 

Retrolental fibroplasia 301 

Detachment of retina 3 

Retinitis pigmentosa 10 
Wnulnr degeneration 
Retinal 



h 

1 
7 



! 



Other affection of retina 6 

Retinoblastoma 7 

Optic neuritis 3 

Optic nerve atrophy (of these 8 caused by brain tumor) 81 

vitreous membrane 1 

Hyperplastic vitreous 1 

No report on site and type of affection 36 



c 






( 



163 

-19- 



TABU5 8 crejfefs4l of ?7l celool M elsl&fcval horn !?lj HwWSjW |J0| on tlie 
Massachusetts Register of the Blind on June 30 f 1965* 

T oui to 

Regular sohools 170 

Perkins School for the Blind 169 

Ransom Greene Unit of the Walter B« Fernald School 137 

Sight Saving Classes 131 

Regular schools with Braille Ul 

Braille classes 16 

Center for BLind Children 

Paul A. Dover State School 

Belchertown State School 

Wrenthan State School 

Ungraded dagoes 

Au none rexaroeo 

Classes for disturbed 

Schools out of state 

Classes for physically handicapped 

In hospitals 

florae tutor 

At home disturbed 

Out of s hool over 16 

Unknown 



TABL8 9 Sources of referral of 77U school age children born 19U7 through 1958 
on the Massachusetts Register of the Blind on June 30, 1965* 

rasi TO 

Mass. Eye sad Ear Infirsery 151 

Other hospitals 22 

OphthalMoiogiftfs 126 

Other physicians 8 

School personnel 102 

Optometrists 2 

tallies 106 

friends of families 15 

Division of Special Education Ik 

Center >r Blind Children 3h 

Public agencies 23 

Private agencies la 

Walter E # FwmaM State School 39 

Other schools for the feeble winded 16 

Perkins School for the Blind 32 

Others 13 



-20- 



IU4 



10 Causes of blindness of 120 preschool blind children born 19$9 end 
later on the Massachusetts Register of the Blind on June 33, 196$* 



WST 



Itydrophthalraos (congenital flaucoraa) 

Microphthalmos 

Anophthalraos 

Albiniea 

Ityopia 

IQrstagsns 

Corneal opacities 

Congenital cataracts (of these 9 caused by rubella in mother) 

Chorioretinitis 

Aniridia 

Coloboma of iris 

Retrolental fibroplasia 

Detaclnent of retina 

Retinitis pigaentosa 

Retinal degeneration 

Coloboria of retina 

Retinoblastoraa 

Optic nerve atrophy (of these 2 were caused by brain tuaor) 

Site and type of affection not established 



T5S 

i 

3 

I 

5 



2k 
23 



11 Whereabouts of 120 preschool blind children born 1959 and later on 
the Massachusetts Register of the Blind on June 30, 1965* 



TOGT 



TS0 



At 



Unit of the V/alter E # Fernald School 
Hone retarded 

Boston Center .^or Blind Children 
Nursery sclwols 
Regular kindergartens 
Perkins School for the Blind 
Regular school 

Belchertoun State School for the Feeble Minded 
Monson Stats Hospital 

Paul A. ever State School for the Feeble Minded 
Wrentham State School for the Feeble Minded 
Unknown 



c 



165 

-21- 



J 



^ m p 12 Sources of referral of 120 preschool blind children born 1959 and 

later on the Massachusetts Register of the Blind on June 30, 1965* 

T5U3 — ES 

Families 28 

Friends 3 

Mass* fy* and Ear Infinaaty 12 

Other hospitals 11 

Ophthalmologist 13 

School personnel I 

Private agencies 11 

Public agencies 6 

Perkins School for the Blind L 

Fernald State School for the Feeble Minded 21 

Yfrentha* State School for the Feeble Minded 1 

Bclchortown State School for the Feeble Minded 2 
Clergyaen 

Division of Special Education 
Local physician 



Scarred corneee 



2 

5 



TABLE 13 Causes of blindness of 82 blind children born 19hl and later 
to the register June 30, 196U - June 30, 1965* 

T5S3I 55 

HydroDhthalmos (congenital glaucoma) h 

Albinism o 

Hjropla 3 

liyflfcSjSJBJg 11 



1 



Congenital cataracts (of these 8 caused by rubella) 18 

Uveitis 1 

Aniridia $ 

Diabetic retinopathy 1 

Itetrolental fibroplasia 3 

Detachment of retina 1 

Retinitis pigmentosa 1 

Retinal degeneration 2 

Bstinobla stoma 2 

Optic nerve atropliy ( of these 3 caused by brain tumor) 11 

Site and type of affection not establish o 



16 

-22- 

TABLB lU Disposition of 82 blind children added to the Massachusetts Register 
of the mind June 30, 1961 - June 33, 1#5. 

Tolal B? 

Regular schools 20 

Sight Saving Classes U 

Preschool counselling 10 

Perkins School Tor the Blind 3 

lb enter erkins Septedber 1965 2 

Itinerant teacher 

Nursery school 

Regular kindergarten 

Ungraded classes 

Vocational Rehabilitation 

Class for physically handicapped 

Class for disturbed 

Belchertovn State School for Feeble Minded 

Died 

Moved out of state 

Mo services requested 



TABU) l£ Diagnosis of 1*2 children with Defective Sight but not legally blind 
referred to the Massachusetts Division of the Blind during the 12 
nonths period June 30, 1?6U - June 30, 1#>5 # 

ToEai H5 



Albinisa 
fyopia 
Hyperopia 
Congenital defect 

Irapi 

Congenital cataracts 

Uveitis 

Retinopathy 

Hetrolentsl fibroplasia 1 

Retinal degeneration 1 

Retinoeis 1 

Optic atrophy 2 

Site and type of affection not established 7 



? 

u 

i 

i 

1 

1 



167 

-23- 

TABLS 16 Disposition of 1*2 children with Defective Sight but not legally blind 
referred to the Jiassaehusetts Division of the Blind during the 12 
months period June 30, 196U - June 30, 1965* 

ToTal E? 

In regular schools 19 

In Sight Saving Classes 9 

To enter Sight Saving Class L 

Itinerant Teacher 3 

Preschool counselling I 

Ungraded classes 2 

Plans pending 1 



TABLE 17 Sources of referral of U2 children with Defective Sight but not 
legally blind referred to the Massachusetts Division of the Blind 
during the 12 months period June 30, 196U - June 30, 1965. 

ToTal 12 

School personnel 21 

Division of Special Education 

Ophthalmologist 

Parents 

Hospitals 

Private organisations 

Selected frora newspaper 



iticS 



APPENDIX B 

WCQKYBHPATIQNS ™ LEGISLATION 
*) AND DRAFT LEGISLATION 



lGJi 



RIOOMKEIIDATIORS 



1. An Act Authorising T^e Division Of The Blind In The Department Of Education 
To Establish, Equip nd Maintain A ttorkshop And Training Facility In The 
Commonwealth For Blind And Certain other Severely Disabled Persons* 



linary increase In the number of blind children during the 19b0»s 
by Rstrolental Fibroplasia is now being reflected in the young adult 
population. Uhile many of these young people are raovinp along to higher education 
after high school on scholarships provided by our Federal-State rehabilitation 
program* there are some who for a variety of reasons are not pursuing higher 
education. These youns people frequently have difficulty in acquiring skill 
needed for industrial work and as a result cannot be placed in industrial jobs* 
They stay home, for the most part unoccupied and idle, and thus do not advance in 
industrial and social skills. They tend to stagnate and become more and more 
dependent upon their families. Tftey need a job-orientt^ training at a slow rate 
which mattes little demands upon them at a particular time. There la no such 
training facility available in the Commonwealth nor is there any existing agency. 
tax supported or voluntary, willing to organise and sponsor such a training 
facility. 

It is recommended, therefore, that the Division of the Blind be given the 
authority and the funds necessary to establish a new training facility which 
will be separate from any existing shop or training facility. Tliis center needs 
to be located In a convenient city location, accessible to young people, and 
located in an area where they can have access to social and cultural activities 
of the city. 



2. An Act Relative To The Register Of Tlie Blind In The Division Of The Hlind. 



The enclosed bill amends Section 19 of Chapter 69 of the General Laws by 
further defining the purposes and uses of the Rsgister of the Blind and sets 
forth that said Register will not be considered a public record and enumerates 
those conditions under which tl* Director nay divulge names of registrants on the 
Register or any information contained in said Register. 



* 



-25- 



Chapter 69 of the General Lane ia hereby amended by inserting after Section 
1U, the following section i — 

Section ll*A « The Division of the Blind in the Department of Education 
hereinafter called the Division is hereby authorised and directed to establish, 
equip and maintain a workshop and training facility hereinafter called the 
workshop in the Commonwealth for the industrial, business and social training 
and for the occupational activity of blind persons who have a substantial employment 
handicap due to noor mobility, inadequate finger and hand dexterity and from 
social, emotional and mental immaturity. For the purpose of providing a broader 
and more realistic industrial and social environment for said workshop there may 
be admitted therein certain severely disabled persons not legally blind as defined 
by statute in Section 1?A of the General Laws but who are in need of industrial, 
bn stacks and social training and occupational activity. The number of such persons 
admitted for training at said workshop shall not exceed forty percent of the total 
complement of persons in training at any given time. Said workshop shall be 
provided with staff and equipment sufficient to enable trainee to develop a 
capacity for work commensurate with their ability. Said workshop shall be 
separate from and housed and directed independent of any other workshop in the 
floTimonwealth. No person admitted for training at said worksliop 3hall receive* 
wages or salary or any other emolument for work done or services performed 
incidental to the training or occupational activity of the said workshop. There 
shall be in said workshop an unpaid board of adnn ssions hereinafter called the 
board. The said board shall be composed of three members who are orofessionally 
active in any of the following fields: psychology, psychiatry, social work, 
special education, vocational guidance, or sheltered workshop direction. It will 

1 the responsibility of said board to evaluate all applications for acinissions 
for training at said workshop and to recoronend persons for training therein and 
to authorise terminations therefrom. Members of said board shall be appointed 
by the said director and may be removed by him from time to tiiae. The terms of 
said board shall be indeterminate or may be of such duration as the said director 
taay determine. 



Chapter 69 of the General Law* is hereby amended by striking out Section 19, 
as revised by Section $ of Chanter 673 of the Acts of 195>1 and inserting in its 
place thereof the following sections — 

S ection 19 . The director of the Division of the Blind in the Department of 
Education shall maintain a Register of the Blind in the Commonwealth whioh shall 
describe therein the condition, cause of blindness and capacity for education 
and industrial training of all blind persons therein registered. Such Register 
shall be maintained on a current basis 30 as to give information which will aid 
in planning improved facilities and services for blind persons and to carry out 
the Division^ programs of restoration of vision and conservation of sight. Such 
register may be utilised to cooperate with the National Institute for Neurological 
Diseases and Blindness in the United States Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare in gathering, classifying and reporting statistics on the incidence and 
prevalence of blindness in order to produce basic data of national importance 
from which further research into the causes of blindness and measures of prevention 
of blindness may be Initiated. Notwithstanding the provisions of any general or 



i?o 



c 



171 

-26- 



special lair to the contrary, the Register of the Blind in the Division of the 
Blind shall be deewed not to be a public record and the director of the Diviaion 
of the Blind shall not make available or in any way divulge the names of blind 
persons registered therein nor shall he make available or in any way divulge any 
ether such data or information contained in or being a part of such Register of 
the Slind to any agency, department, division or authority of the Commonwealth 
or of any of its political sub-divisions for any purpose other than the 
furnishing of services to blind persons or in the conduct of research into the 
causes of blindness and dependency. 



► 









oimr^ 






'965 



?; %% 



I 



72 



ul vision of Library intension 

Year maim June yo, 1965 



lhe fiscal 196b year mm out of now dlsw/neions, greater support, 
increased recourses, planning for extensive lwtorrolatlonahlpa , and a 
gradual but steady trend in Urn olreetlon of specialisation ana automation 
Into urn total library picture. In the ll#bt of too vary raoant and rapid 
developesnte in Feueral legislation wrlob aarry treaenoous Implications 
for the futura of public, school, college and university, and special 
libraries, tba &9th Congroaa night wall bo extolled aa tna 'Library Congress." 

1^6^ was tna yaar of the firat lnatallsent of tna National Inventory 
of library fcseds. Scientific and teehnologleel advances underlying all 
eoanunioatlon and inforaiatlen activities are creatine a revolution in 
librariananip calling for a radiaal stepping up of library support. Tna 
national Inventory of library needs ia a cooperative effort of tha American 
Library Association and tha Library Services Branch of tba U. 3. Office 
of Education intended to determine where we are saterlally in relation to 
tha basic book and staff needa of tna Nation's ii&reriea. 

bow did Meaaachueetta public llbrariea eeaaure up in this National 
Inventory? inirty-f ive per cent of tna local public libraries are not 
currently sooting ain l n aa n adequate standards in terea of book resoureea. 
Ihla in contrast to a elxty-nlne per cent figure for the whole nation. 
WLnety-four par cent of our public libraries failed to aeet the standard 
for general operating expenditure* - a figure which la Just silently below 
tha ninety-seven per cent for tha nation. 

Tha retrospective and currant deficiencies in tha Cowaonwealth'a 
school library picture are store serious and wore pronounced. In 1962, 
*o.5f of tha public school neaeership attended aohoola without centralised 
school libraries * as eespared to a naticnwluo figure of 26,35. An even 
larger percentage of the non-public school sse&ershlp wars without centralised 
school Ubrarlaa - 50.6$ as coa par o d to 37*21 for the nation. 

Ihe National Inventory 'a presentation of the library picture in our 
four-year and two-year inetitutiona of higher srtuooalon was bleak indeed - 
with over lb% of the inaUtutlona in both categories falling to sajet natisnal 
sf a nr s r oo for resources, ataff and operating eapenditura*. 

The isprovenent of these figures should provide a treroenooue challenge 
to the education and library cosnunlty of the Bay State: 



•1- 



i; 



LOCAL - STATE * PUBERAL PARTNERSHIP 



With support now cowing from three levels of government, public 
libraries say look toward Moving steadily but surely in the direction 
of a statewlos program of adequate public library service for every 
sitisea whether he resides in a small village or the oapltaleelty. 

Statistics prove conclusively that the direct ctate aid granta to 
local municipalities for public library service have raised per capita 
library support at the local level almost in direct and exact proportion 
to the amount of the grant* And this is happening despite the fact that 
the state sid Ism permits making the srsnt pev/tty much a paper transaction 
if a local municipality Is appropriating $3.00 or more per capita for public 
library service. 

Die two on-coiiu; state-aided Regional Public Library Systems in 
Central and Western M as sa chu setts are supplementing local library service 
in their 171 member libraries and providing at the local library consumer 
level a regional borrower's card honored in all libraries of the system, 
the Regional Systems are providing for local library reference use a union 
list of serials available in public, college, special and industrial 
libraries ; directories of area libraries describing available resources 
In public, academic , law, medical and foundation libraries; creator library 
resources, and opportunities for ln-servlee training. 

P. L. 88-369 - the Library Service* and Construction Act expanded 
the Library Services Act paased in 1937. the earlier limitation of service 
only to rural areas was removed* She Msasashusetta allotment of funds 
under Title I - for public library services was increased to over five 
timss the allotment of any one previous year, the increased funds permitted 
the attainment of a lone-sought goal - the harnessing of the ststewJae 
later-iibrary loan program to the state's largest public library. With a 
substantial grant of federal funds to euppleeent local funds for the purchase 
of books and related materials, the boston Public Library assumed the 
responsibility of functioning as a clearing house and "last recourse'' library 
for statewide inter-library loan. Under a cumbersome and unwietdy system 
which drew heavily on a gratis basis on the resources and staff of several 
of the larger municipal libraries in the Boston area, the *A vision had been 
coorritiiailng statewide inter-library loan for over 53 yesvs. Ths present 
arrenftsamm* should both improve and speed-up service . and will release 
Division staff for supervisory and planning responsibilities. 

Ins Division's collection of approximately 5*000 books in more than 
2% foreign languages waa transferred on permanent loan to the Boston Public 
Library to be melded with their own foreign language collections. This 
■TTfirijamsiit will provioe for local libraries throughout the state access 
to a richer collection of foreign lan#usga materials available for loan by 
titles or In collections. 



-i»- 



( 



i 



174 



lb* snsoshlng of stats snd federal aid funds to brine about sound 
library service plana within tha regional ayetesa aa tha lntennediate 
service level between local *unicipslltiee and tha Stata Dlvlalon la 
proving to ba an excellent catalytic agent providing tha funda to Innovate 
and demonstrate laaglnetlve and naw ldaaa for bat tar library eerrice at 
tha conauoar level. 

IK SHS BOILD1M UU31MSS 

""■ » ■ « II » 1 «»|i.i..„ Ml 

Title II of tha library Services and Construction Act put thla 
In tha library building bualnaaa In 1965* Tha program waa launched with 
a flourish of nlnataan applications all applying for federal fUnde for a 
public library building project, Tha Massachusetts ahara of $610,122. plua 
an additional $75,000 fron tha raollotaant pool una allocated to aid 
building projects for tha sunlelpslltlss of Acton, Andover, Auburn, Fitchbur* 
hlngham, Leominster, Randolph and tisbrldge, «rs. Batty Flynn, Senior 
Supervisor of Fubllc Library Developsant dea e r v ea high praise for her astute 
direction of thla procrw. Tfcroujfcb a naaa of blueprints, public library 
building standards, federal regulations, wage determinations etc. ahe has 
menaced to afcillfully &uide arehltecU t municipal officiale, legal counaellora 



Cn March 26 and 27, thla division joined tha Horary extension 
of tha other five Htm England Stataa In eo~eponeorln£ with tha Simons 
College School of Library Science a Fubllc Library Building Institutes, 
One hundred llbrarlana and trustees frosj the New KngLand Stataa who were 
to sjsbark on a building project ware Invited to attend. Institute 
registration fees ware paid for all participants fro* tha various states' 
LSCA title I funda. The success of thla pilot cooperative venture in library 
education augurs wall far the future, we will seat certainly explore other 
possibilities for the involvement of the Slsnone School of Library Science 
In statewide and regional currant activities end long ran**) planning. 

Oh the scbOQL usbakiks fb qht 

following closely on tha heels of strong rscuiajaitdatloiaj for the 
developnaant of school libraries which ap pe ar ed in the Sunsary Report of 
tha Special Cccvdaslon Bslatlve to Ilsprovlng and Extending Educational 
Facilities in the Cossjonwealth cares the lotm- -otl'xi in Congress of the 
1965 n as i a n tary and Seoondard Education Act, The Dlvlalon waa privileged 
to bo Identified close*- with this legislation fron the begirmimr. Charles 
w. Adam, Supervisor of School Ubrarlea testified for the American Library 
Association in behalf of Title II - the School Librsjy Title on January 27, 
1965 before the General Sub-Covnlttee on Education of the House Oossdttee 
on Education and Labor, In Marsh, Mr. Adsms assisted the Division Director 
In preparing a tentative Title II State Flan which Ccnsdaaloner Kiemsn 
preaented at a Chicago aseting of the Council of Chief Stete School Officers. 

-3- 






lbs enactment of T.L. 89-10 In April heralds a bright and shining 
era nor the development of school librerlee at the elss*ntary and 
ooofffMlary school levels In both public and non-public schools. To 
prccucs a top-notch State Plan will ba a real taat of our settle. Da 
plaoe Maaaaahuaatta In the school Ubrarlaa hit parade top tan will ba 
our goals 



aaUff&TO 



. >WW W » ' l i l U»# l l » WlUXM 



"Library talk** rel&ned suprewe at tha Salute to Congress luncheon 
held on January 26, 1945 In the huge Regency bellreon at the Shorehaa 
hotel la Naahlntftcsu Inis special A.L.A. Congressional TTmohoon arranged 
to honor aes&ers of Congress una a highlight of this year's annual A.L.A. 
Midwinter Heating* 

Alice M. Cabin, the Dlvlaion'a Aaalatant Director had the nejor 
responsibility for the great aucceas of this state's participation In the 
Two tables were rs oo r vo d far the Ccmonwealth. 



Capitalising; on the opportunity to bring C on&rei s a aw i up-to-date on 
current and future plana aa well aa to attain recapitulate the impressive 
library gains nade throughout the State In the past five or six years, a 

special Nawa Latter Edition waa served up to Ccngresawen with the delicious 
itibles. 



Gracing the luncheon tables were attractive aaored cod place card 
produced through the oourteay of *r. Janes L. Burke, Senior Supervisor 
In the Division of Vocations! Education and Mr. waiter D. Held, Director 
of the weldon Technical School in Medford. 

COKJSY TQtiMXE 

Thla la the 75th anniversary year of the Division - the first state 
library extension agency In the country* the official birthday dinner 
wee heM on April 29, 196$ in the Louis XIV BaHroon of the Soneraet Hotel. 
Governor Voire, Comlssloner Hernan, and Corvjsreeeaam Oonte were head table 
guests along with professional oellea&jfe*, Jean L. Connor, Director of the 
New York State lAvlalon of Library Extension; *t. John 0. Lorena, Dlrectca? 
of the Division of Library Extension, U. S. Office of Education and Mr. 
Kenneth ft* Shaffer, Director of the School of Library Science at Siwsone 
College* 

In february and May In two lnatallnente and after over twenty yeara 
of ocaiyeney we left our happy but terribly ove rcr ow ded have) on the third 
floor of the Departaent of Education Building at 200 Newbury Street to 
neve to the sane elevation In the J%*>11 Oil *ullt lng at 6*8 Beacon Street 
on Juwnore Square In boston. 



» 



( 



176 



Luring our few and fur be tw ee n spare saeamte, we have done a little 
digging and delving into our aoohlvea ~ the early reporte of the Board of 
Library Ceaeiiaelonere. Thaaa recorde certainly eerve to evoke aoteiratlon 
and appreciation - yaa and ever~ aurprlaa - for the aoocnpliataetite of tha 
state's library past. It'e more than a little bit atari ling to learn that 
aany of tha innovatlone of public library eerviee In thia well paat adaV 
twentletn eentury wore a regular library service feature In tha early 
1900'e albeit celled by ace* other terse than thoao In acaaam usage in 
tooay'e library Jargon. Cfaa is tempted to aay - ia anything mar wider 
the sun? 

COQKX&VM - CCCODIMATICK - CQKCLU8ICW 

Modern intellectual development aay not be confined in elngle lnetl- 
tutiona or by narrow geographical boundarloa. there ia an ever-growing 
awarenaaa today of tha value and lsqportance of librariaa and librariana in 
our society. Alccst daily there ia •ountln^ evidence of the paat error la 
viewing librariaa aa a atatlc boueokeeplng eerviee rather than aa a product 
of change and a "vital phenomenon* directly related to education, reeearch 
and progress at all levele of society and of government. 

Swing the paat year wa have worked closely with state, regional and 
national library associations in the development of pro&reao, projtcte, and 
studies. Our staff aesfcere have oooperated with, awong many othera suet* 
aganelee aa tha American Correctional Association, Ecok-of-tbe-Hontn Club, 
I. S. Aragr Library Service, Association for International Dsvelepnaet - a 
OB paoject involving book publishers frosi Nigeria, Indonesia and Afghanistan, 
tha University of New Hampshire Extension Service and the Massachusetts 
Education Study Corral ttee. 

Any aaaaure of suooaaa we have achieved in the paat year ia dm to 
a combination of intertwining forcea rather than to the efforta of any one 
individual or lndividulaa. The Divialon ia neat fortunate to have the 
direction and aupport of a hard-working, knowledgable, and Interested Board 
of Library Courlsslonera . Aa Director, I appreciate deeply the loyalty, 
the cooperation and the leadership qualifies of a too avail but neat 
efficacious professional staff, and the enthuaiaaw, wiUirwwee, ability, 
and te aaaaa r k of a supporting ataf f without which we could not fraction 
efficiently and effectively. Both groups have had to work thia paat year 

considerable pressure because of stsff shortages. 



with the combination of etaff forcea Indicated above eoapled with 
adequate financial support we will attempt to protlOt thia state's need 
for aoto espanalve and active library services , and thereby to aoet the 
challenges of the National Inventory. Our efforta will be directed toward: 



( 



1. 



$ It Catohlng «P with the past. 



2. Plamlnf for a steady pragnesslen free the p wrnrt situation 
to an iBf>r©t*o out. 

3. iMklm to the fViture with new iweclnstlre Ideas for interrelate* 
aiva services. 



Respectfully submitted, 

V. Genevieve aaliek 
Director 



( 






FISCAL 1969 
STATISTICAL SUMKAHf 



I, 



; 



atate appropriation for Division Opsraticri 
State Aid for Direct Qrutf to cities 

and teens 
Stat* Aid for Regional Public Library 

jyotaiuo 
Federal runet Allotment for L3CA - Title I 
Federal Fund altatwent for LSCA - Tltl* II 

TOTAL 



I 203,1*0. 
1,270,029. 

612,857, 
653.637. 

*3,629,7«5. 



Staff: 



- 20 Sub-professional - 29 i/2 

Vacancies as of June 30, 1965 
Professional - 6 AaVprofeaaional - 5 



Certific ation and Plaoawa nt Activities: 

Professional certifications by exsttlnatlor 
Profeeslonal certifications by library school degree 
Aubprofessional cerUflcations 
Certificates 



i-iDrariaiia re^isterec for placement referral 
libraries using placswent referral service 
Positions listed with placement referral service 



35 
192 

I 

E* 

M 

IM 



tuulleatlone: 



Hurnber of Iss ues 



75th Annual htport of the Board 

Division Nana Latter 

Random tiotec for School Librarians 

Selected Aeeeaalona Liat 

Broehure on 1S6*. Oovernor's Conferenoe 

Library Service In Massachusetts (a N.L.W. broehure) 

Miscellaneous fcroup 



1 
12 



-7- 



i. 





hoaaquartara ond 
noftlfiifcl Contort 
st Fall Rivar and 

*^^^0> lPO# S W FOSJ^SfS** *0*> 


Control 
Rational Syatoia 


Woo torn 
Htgionsl Sfrstoa 


books In colloetlona 
6-J0-65 


125,922 


23,721 


66,526 


looks oddod In 1965 


7,894 


12,730 


14,53« 


Books olroulssod 


317,146 


32,463 


364,986 


Intor-llbrary loon 
snd raforanea 
roquosts 


9,4*1 


7,635 


13,615 


Pitas Losnod 




5,257 


3,124 


Total ttlft Audlancas 




213,223 


161,627 


Booklists ond 

bibliographias 
eoopUod 


26 


« 


9 


ptooww amd seance AcnvrriES 





tioadquartara and 

Rational Cantara 

st Foil Rlvor ond Control 

north B ao dlng fiogl ona l Syst ow 



tfostorn 



Piold Visit* 

Offleo Conforanoas 

Talks ond Program 
Participation 

In-oonrlca training 

01 

of snrollaas 



159 
374 

61 

9 

292 



276 

Mi 

22 

11 

203 



III 

592 



21 
235 



180 



For the period 
JAtfflAHT 1, l r <l to r P 31 1 l oA U 



furinp the calendar year l ^!, the fUTty-flret consecutive year 
of manannr the Massachusetts Teachers' Retirement °ystem t the Teachera* 

ptirer: t Board pursued its activities in numbers and dollars to the 
extent of the following:- **ew teachers erterinp the service of the 
public schools of Massachusetts for the first tiwe, o r who"* membership 
wa. r required, numbered 5»917« "^^rr teacher members who were reinstated 
numbered °3 n . feoosits in the amount of . %?60.*6 were received and 

credited to the accounts of the members. Teoosits ir the amount of 

,h3?.°l were received by transfer frr^ other retirement systems in the 
Cownonweal th and were credited to members' accounts. The net interest on 
investments totaled J5 # 766,llli.6Y). The number of teachers who left 4 
service through resignation totaled 3, p J'-5. Of this number, l,7l! re- 
ceived refunds totalirp *l,^6,6hli.!n and ? f ij] accounts total i 
*1 ,7'i°,33 r, .6£ were transferred to the inaetlve membership accourt. fle- 
fundr total*- R3?»1?U« ?7 wore paid r ro*« the inaetivs penbershlp accounts 
to ~,V teachers whose servicer had t-. . r thneagh re sign a prior 

to January 1, l 6lu Transfers of depose the n oi ft?l5 t 8Alu20 

were made to other retirement systems on accourt of 1?9 teacherr, who ter- 
minated by resignation. ' efunds of 336u,l F 'i.7^ were paid to the be'-ef 1 - 
claries and estates of 6? teachers who died in 10f*Ji and |fl # £93»63 was pai^ 
on account of 3 teachers who died prior to January 1, 1°6U. 

retirement allowances on account of superannuation were estab- 
lished for 667 teachers in the amount of <l ?, p !:?,5?6.36 of which %\ 3?,?l0.2li 
ia annuity which is derived from the accumulated total deductions of the 
teacher on the date of retirement and t? f Ull,3l6.1? is pension charpeable 
to the apnropriation made by the Commonwealth for this purpose. Retirement 
allowances on accou-t of ordinary disability were established for 7 teachers 

the amount of &l3,?ll.i6, of which 11*161.34 is annuity and *ll,7u°. r 
is pension. Retirement allowances on accou t of accidental disability 
were established for ? teachers in the amount of *ir,37?.o6, of wh«ch 
l t ?6?,h0 is annuity and Hi ,010. W is pension. 

nhrr -survivor allowances were estab 1 -' s u ed in p instances in 
which the teacher died before retirement apr* had appointed an p^'rible 
beneficiary. The total o r the annual allowances w» , "~'*.~ r , of which 

, 'o.UB is annuity and 111, 76?. I is pension. Member-survi or allowances 
were established ir J n other instances in which teeeheri died before retire- 
ment without noMnai "np. an eliplble beneficiary and the spouse was elirible 
to elect the wemb. i -survivor allowance in lieu of a cash refund of the 
accumulated total deductions to the credit of the member on hi s date of 
death. This number include^ 1 case in which a retire^ teic v f r died wMMn 

dayr of the date of retir^c-i and the r^rr^r <->^ ? h to r^ee^ve the 
all ce in ] of a cash refund. Th«. Uts." 1 o r iU 1 allowances 

established in these cases was ?67, 773. Wi, of wWch Il6,6l$.< annuity 



- ? - 



these capes was *67,773. p Ij, of which |l6 t 6l5.66 if ar.ruity and 151,15*. 16 

penrion. r urvivor allowances were also established in 13 instances 
in which the teacher member died be r ore retirement, and the widow or per- 

acting for surviving children -under age l p or over said age who were 
physically or rental ly Incapacitated from earning on the date of death of 
the member, elected to receive benefit? for widows and/or children. The 
total of the annual allowances so established war Sr6, r > Pr ». nn , of which 
• c 3,UjO. 76 is derived from the accumulated total deduction and %??/39.?h 
if chargeablr to the Commorwealth appropriation. In a*U 7£° teachers or 
their survivors were placed or the retired ro^l of the system. 

There were ?93 retired teachers who died, and of this number 
there were 19 instance? in which survivor allowances were continued to 
an eligible beneficiary, as the teacher had elected the joint and la. c i sur- 
vivor form o r retirement allowance at the tiT.e of retirement. The total 
of survivor allowances to be continued was tlil,08l«6!ij of wh''ch *7,f "\3' 
is annuity and ^3 r ,U3U. ^^ is pension. In the remaining ?7b instances 
a total of $?76,67?.1° was paid to the beneficiaries or estate" of teachers 
who had elected the cash refund annuity form of retirement allowance at 
the if retirement. T^ addition, lfl beneficiaries who were receiving 

survivor allowaneea died and in these instances no further payments were 
made after the de^th. Tn all ?PJj teahrrs and beneficiaries were removed 
from the retired roll of the system. 

As o T Tecember 31, 196k, there were 7, p ^lt retired teachers and 
survivors receivinp allowances from the system. The annual retirement 
allowances of these perso-s totals *?h,£lil , p <>6.1$ of which 1i,n7:*, p Q?.li* ia 

)ity and l?D,U6P,^ n 3.75 is pension. Of this number 131 were receiving 
allowances on account of ordinary disability totalis *?l p , p 7' r .b'' , of which 
$? P ,$Q?.6)» is annuity and *loo,?Pr , .Po |g pension; 1 3 were receivinp allow- 
ances on account of accidental disability totaling 35* f 3?. r > p , of which 
15,1 79. 6* is annuity and $5o,P5?. hr is pension; f spouses were receiving an 
accidental death benefit in the amount of *7,3lP.h n per year all chargeable 
to pension; l?n beneficiarier were receiving Joint a> d last survivor allow- 
ances tot* *?17,U?3.M, of which *Uh,^6ii.fn ir annuity and $17?,U5 p . e >i is 
pension; Po survivors of teachers who died before retirement and who had 
been appointee by the member as survivor allowance be^efiri-ries, were 
receiving allowances totaling ^l < n,T57. ?lj , of which -Li' ,c^o.P r is irnu 4 ty 
and $116,107.36 is pension; JlJ survivors of teac ers who 6'r><? before retire- 
ment and who as spouses elected to receive member-survivor allowance? in 
lieu of cash refund*, were receiving allowances tot^lir ■- *ll n ,?7h. pn , of 
which foP,?96.0P it an-r ity and 33^,°77.* p is pension - included in this 
number are 3 spouses o* teachers who r^ired and died witMn 3^ days of the 
dat* of retirement: 5° widows and persc-s, ac'ing for surviving children 
under age IP or over said age and physically or mentally incapacitated from 
earning on the date of Ami *h of the teacW>r, were receiving allowances as 
widows flrd/or surviving children, totalfn? *ll p /c$. ?j f Q f which •T^^^if . 7^ 
is derived from accumulated tctal deductions and $lc>5,o5 Q .5l ir chargeable 
to the pension appropriation made by the Commonwealth - included in this 
number are 11 husbands or guardians receiving allowances pa<c solely for the 
eligible chil rer: of female teacher members, " v re were 7,3^? living 
retired tracers receiving superannuation retirement allowances in the amount 
of "?3,6J>7,°?U.7*, of which ^V?". *'." is annuity and A 10,75)», c .' ,p . r '^ ia 
pension. 



18 J 



( 



( 



( 



- 3 - 



1812 



Annual statements of balances of member? 1 individual accounts 
were mailed seasonably to UP,7l6 members; of this number lih,5U p were members 
actjvelv engaged in the teachirg service; L,l6* were inactive members, those 
who have terminated from the teaching service other than by retirement and 
death, and who have left the accumulated deductions on deoosit. 

The annual financial st^te^ent of the syrtem required of the 
Teachers' Fctireme-t Boad war filed seasonably with the Office of the 
Commissioner of Insurance. 

The annual reports required of the Teachers' Betirement Board were 
filed seasonably with the Governor, St-^te Treasurer and Commissioner of 
Education. 

On Pece-ber 31, 196U, the amount of reimbursement to be paid by 
the Commonwralth for the school year 1963-1 961* on account of pension of 
teachers retired under the local systems was as follows: 



Bo5tor School Committee 

Boston Retirement Board 

State-Br - tirement System 

Brookline 

Cambridge 

Milton 

Pittsfield 

Wellesl ey 



lU6,76n.6? 

*6,37°.31 

3,h6n f ?) J o.66 

5,olil.71 
5,553.19 

3,^1.99 

1,350.00 

l,6n?.i? 
T0TA T *3,709,<n p .*n 



Respectfully submitted, 

Owen B. Kiernan, Commissionfr 

Favmon W. Eldridpe 



Helen N. Thienert 



c 



( 



is: i 






FINANCIAL STATT 



( 



( 



P»R« 1 

184 



Flh TEAR !TT T> ^ } : ' r 31, l^fli, w AfE To TH7! 
COWr^--.-- - ^.H-fcA'T- BY Tff r 'r-- T A r v o y T HF 
' •■•AfHF- rt ' ' '■■ T BOA ry 

AWITTY rAV M r , A'^'H RgygF ' ^ and ^1^' 1?H H'T 

Annuity r avings Fund: 

Members deposits snd personal payments ?l$ 9 lty),?6n,96 

Members depositr transferred from Other 

Retirement fystems in the Commonwealth 95,L3?.°1 

Interest on investment" (less £9°,367.£fl 
accrued interest and ftl f #*P.Of) interest 
receipts adjusted by Treasurer) 5,766,llli.*0 

Amount in excess of amortised value received 

on investments called, sold, and exchanged lj,77?. (C 3 

From Pension Fund — 
Workmen's Compensation deductions 110.3^ 

Fein statement - Unclaimed inactive members accounts 3,011. 6o 

Annuity Tererve Funds 

From Military Service Credit Fund- 
Accumulated v 51itary c ervice Credit deposits of 

members retired 1,531.0? 

Accumulated Military Service Credit deposits of 
members - member- survivor benefit* 3,1^7. ?° 

From ^ension Fund— 
Deficit - Annuity Reserve ^~ec. 31, 1°63 ?<>5,S6P.l5 

c ectior 1?B Fundi 

From Military Fervice Credit Fund- 
Accumulated Military Fervice Credit deposits of 
■embers - *>c.l?R survivor benefit- ?*7.11 

ToUl Income I fit 310,136. 



CARRIED FORWAFD 



c 



< 



N*l-4j 85 



> 



AWUITY PAVr T O r *l/: T , A^T'TY • ■•■ •. T l • t and fPC° ^ l?V n Mp 
BROIGHT F P rf A R P — Total Tncome fTl, 3*\136.P6 



fisbur semen ts 

Annuity Faving? Fund: 

Refund? to member? - resignation t?,li3°,76 p .6F 

Refunds to benef. ft estate? - deaths 

(less - canceled check ?57.?M 3 7 3,o? p .3li 

Transfer? of deposit? of member? to Other 

Retirement Systems in the Commonwealth ?l5, pp li. ?° 

To Pension Fundi 

Gain on investments called, sold, and 

exchanged I ,77?. 63 

Interest earned in 1°63 in excess of 

interest credited in 1°63 6P?,oo6.b3 

Excess interest credited to members 

accounts refunded 5thO p .?l 

. Unclaimed inactive members accounts 

w over 10 yrs.old 11, ^'7. 70 

Investment expense 3°1.?5 

Pecrease in market value stocks 6,600.00 

Decrease in amort5 ration 10,h7 p . p 3 

Annuity Reserve Fundt 

Annuity payments - Retired members and 

member survivors a/c Option (c> and Ootion (d) 3,^1 ?,o p ?.?3 

Cash Refund Annuities to estates and 

benef iriarier of retired members ?7',*7?.1° 

Section 1?B Fund: 
To Pension Fund— 

Payment? to survivor? - chargeable to 

accumulated deposits - c ection 1?B 13,h6P.°3 

Total Piebursementa 7,°5k.55 Q .7? 

Income in excess of disbursements £13,365,577.11 



< 



T TAV- 10- »nrt A' ' 1 *" v "JPP 



p »* e 1 -" ISli 



Assets 

Investments, Schedule A par value (fcl67,331,°°o.> 

Amor tired value 
r avings Bank Peoosite 
Stocks - Market value 
Caeh 
Accrued Interest on investment* 



Gross Assets 



Liability r- 



3,113, 
5"6, 



3I4I.05 
67P.61 



3?, 

in. 



I 



reductions and personal payments of members -active 110?, 176,981. 79 
Interest credited ?6,l.Po,$3 p .?7 

Accumulated deductions of members - active 
deductions and personal payments of 

members - inactive 
Interest credited 

Accumulated deductions of members - inactive 
reductions and personal payments of 

members - deceased 
Interest credited 

Accumulated deductions of members - deceased 
Reserve for payments of survivor benefits 

a/c Section 1? 
Reserve for payments due beneficiaries and 

estates of deceased retired members and 

deceased survivor beneficiaries 
Reserve ^or retired members, beneficiaries, 

and survivors living 
Tue Commonwealth as provided by Section ?? 

of Chapter 3? of the General Laws 



p?i. Po 



Total Liabilities 



Membership 



Active membership December 31, 19*Li 
Inactive membership Tecember 31, 196U* 

Resigned or terminated - unpaid 

Deaths - Unpaid 

Retired - living 

Accidental Teaths 

Benef.of retired teachers receiving under Op.(c) 

Member-survivor benef • receiving under 
r ecU on 1?(?) ( Option fd>) 

Turvivor? receiving benefits under Section 17B 

Total Membership December 31, 19fli 



U f l68 

1? 

7,3°o 

? 

Ur>3 
5f 



•l6 p ,7?6/63.07 
600,000.00 

91,°5>.oo 

?, p 39,l p l.<?3 

l,5 on . 76o.o? 

fl73, p li p ,6$5.o? 



l?R,6$7,S?o.o6 

3,6?o f o?o.$6 

h3,3lil.nU 
lS5,66o.U° 

31,li^.lh 
blfOft^tO.OO 

31?,"63.73 
$173, P >A 655.0? 

tt,5U 



ir,o6h 
56.612 



I hereby certify that the above statement is a complete and correct exhib* t of 
the financial condition of the Teachers' Retirement System of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts on the thirty-first day of r ecember, 196h. 



A true statement, made under the penalties of perjury. 




,M 



- 

Xa^cutive r ecretary 



Pare 7 1 






NET TNTE 7 ?^ FARNET IN lQ6u and A*OU\"] cr.y.rTTP r r» ACC* ' 



Total T nterest received on investments 

I.ese to correct interest credited fee. l r '° 
Accrued Interest Pec. 31, 196h 

Total 



*5,*67,l->n.J| 

l,6*».nn S5, P 6 C ',LP?.3 P 

7,156, Ht.kO 



Accrued Tnterert on investments purchased 
Accrued Interest Dec. 31, 1963 



,3'7.5 P 



Total 



Balance 



Amortized value of investments Tec. 31, 1°*3 
Value of 5avjnps Bank feposi ti Tec. 31, 1963 
Par Value of investments purchased 
Premium on investment? purchased 
Savings Dank Peoosits purchased 
c tocV purchased 



Total 

Investments matured 

A— -trtieed Value of investments 

-a) led and sold 
fiscount on purchases 



Total 



Balance 



Amortized val^ie of investments 

Tec. 31, 1961i 
Value of Sarlofi Bant feoosits 

Dec. 31, 1961j 
Value of c tocks Tec. 31, 1Q6L 



Total 



fecrease 



Total 
Teduct Invert men t expense 
Vet Interest earned 



156,533, '75.6? 

inn f ooo. nn 

l5,*li8,l56.<M 

H&,no«5o 

Cynn 9 nryr> .no 
9 p t ) ^.^o 

173,30b,7*6»18 



&?,M;5, i5n.no 

1,377, t35.6f 

L6,6n*.6n 



l6°,«35,79l«90 



166,736,863.07 

6nn # nno.oo 
9', pt -'n.no 



l6o,):lP.713.Q7 



l,5)-6,37Mdi 
5,ooo,P63.Q^ 



17,n7P.P3 
5, p o?,7P5.13 

3<>1. 35 
♦5, p o?,3°3.7 p 



C A P T T ? f> FOPWAPP 



P«W 7-A 



18 



I 



'■T T ' ■ " r :-T- T TV 1Q& and A^P: r G j TO MEMBERS' AC( 



BROUGHT FORWARD 



Net Inter** Ft earned 



•5,P«? f 3«3.7* 



Interest credited during 196b j 
To withdrawal refunds 
To death refund b 
To accounts of member f transferred 

to Other Retirement 'ystewB 
To account? of member* retired in l°6ij 

Total 

Inters Ft credited Ter, 31, l*6ki 
To balances of m ember f la 

active service 
To balances of awmbers in 

withdrawal account 
To unpaid death accounts 
To /nnuity Reserve Fund 

Total 

Total Interest credited 

Lesr adjustment account of interest 

credited in error prior to Jan. 1, 19*1* 

Net Tntrrert credited charged apainst 
interest earned 



Net Interest earned in excess of interest 
credited to be transferred to the 
Cormonwealth a?= provided by r ec.??C6VaV 



*3n,3Qt,Sli 

f,m.m 

3,767.66 



3.771.L30.U9 

l^P, r 7?.r? 

1,630.63 

l,ir7 t ohQ.3Q 



?110,77$.ni 



5,03*. 9 r ?. 73 
5,l5P,7?7.7h 



5,1. c ?P.7?7,po 



•733,**$.* 



Amount received for investments called, 
sold, and exchanged 

Amorti*ed value of investments called, 
sold, and exchanged 

■•1 QiSn on investment? called, sold, 
*nd exchanged (franeftertd to 
Pension Fund as prov d»d by °ec.??(3Vc)> 



1,3 P ?,™ P .?$ 

l f 377.?35.6" 



*'•, 777.63 



Pag© ?-B 



18J3 



AWtlTTT SAVT?fGS and JWHCITY PKT.TVE FUND 



Fate of Interest Earned in 1961* 



Ledger Assets Pecember 31, 1963i 
Investments (Amortised value) 
Savings Bank Deposits 
Cash 

Total 

Ledger Assets Eece-nber 31, lo6h: 
Investments (Amortised value) 
Favinpp Bank Dapoalta 
r tocks (Market value) 
Cash 

Total 



f 



£l6P,7?6,P63.^7 
P, p 3<M r l. Q 3 



$156,C33,?7S.6? 

?,?$<>, ob p. ?h 



Mean 



17P,P57,*9S.r»o 
l65,$7$,106 # tj 



Net Interest earned - $S,P9?,393.7 P 



Si522|2S2J£ * ?/?i*6,i96.P9 

$16?,6?P,90 < ?.51 



Rate $,P9i\393.7P 



■ 3.6?3# 



Pa?e 3 

11 



ANNUITY ■F.rPKVE a : MT= 

Annuity Reserve Dec. 31, 1963, for retired members 

and Option (c) and Option (d) beneficiaries living $37,£oo,6£h.r>o 

Annuity Reserve Tec. 31, 1963, for amount? due 

estates of retired member* and beneficiaries deceased 6Jj # $lO.0O 

Accumulated total deductions of ackers retirsd ** 
196k and Option (d) benefits effective in 1961 — 

Papular *6,0l?,093.3? 

Military U,63 ff .31 

6,r>if,731.63 
Interest credited to Annuity Peserve *und rec.?1,196U l,l?7,OliC-.3Q 

Due from Commonwealth a/c deficit for year l°6h 

as provided by Action ?r(?)(d) ?t?l,gP9.36 

Total *li r ,?So,h7£.ll 

Annuity Reserve Pec. 31, 196L, for retired members 

and Option (c) and Option (d) beneficiaries 

living ll,o?F,6?0.or> 

Annuity Peserve Pec. 31, 106li, for amount due 

estates of retired members and beneficiaries 

deceased 31 f li?0.lU 

Annuity Payments (Net) 13,913, *P?.?3 
Payments to estate? - Option (b> (♦Tet) ?76,67?.19 
Reinstated to adive service 6 P <\ 6? 

U.19Q.h3S.oli 
Tot *l *15,??0,!.7$.I* 



A true statement, made under the penalties of perjury, 




Executive fecretary 
Teachers* Retirement Board 



< 



Pape U 



U 



9j 



SECTION 1?B TOH13 



Fection 1?B Fund Fe.«erve Pec. 31, 1°63, for 

beneficiaries living 
Accumulated total deduction? transferred 

a/c benefits effective in 196U 
Accunulate^ Military Service Credit deductions 

tranrf erred a/c benefits effective in 196h 

Total 



$lhn/^.36 

??7.11 
n^ f 13P.b? 



Payment? to survivor f in 19*1 
Reserve to defray payments as required 
by Section 1?B of Chapter 3? of the 
General Laws, as of Dec. 31, 196U 

Total 



$13,16*.93 



I55,*6<?.k9 



n6o, 13PJ»? 



( 



Page 5 



TEACHFrf 1 T BOA PT 



? " ••"~3K Ft"f for year ending December 31 f l°6b 



T ncome 

Received from Appropriation by Commonwealt h for 

Pension Fund as provided by Action ??(3) *1<>,16 R ,79?.15 

Peceived from City, Town, and County Petirement 

fystems a/c reimbursement as provided by 

Section S(*)<c) 6,ft6».bJ 

Peceived fror nembere retired account of disability 

as refund of oension - Section ^lA l,°lh.7? 

Received from Unclaimed Check Fund 

a/c Chapter 531, Acts of \Q$7 7?5.°5 

Peceived from Section 1?P fond Account a/c of 

payments charged to Pension Fund in 196b 13,U6fi.93 

Peceived from Annuity Pavings Funi a/c excess 

interest credited on refunds from withdrawal 

account - Action ??(6)(&) 5,liOP.?l 

Received from Annuity Savings Fund as provided by 

Chapter $31, Acts of 19$7 11,957.7" 

Peceived from Annuity Savings Fund a/c gain on 

Investment? called, sold, and exchanged (Net) h,77?.63 

Received from Annuity ravings Fund a/c interest 

earned in 1963 In excess of Interest credited 

in 19*3 (Fectlon ??(6)(a)(i3i)) 6*?.oq*.U3 

Total $19,P96,on6.l5 



> 



< 



Paps 5 -A 

193 



PF r IOTl Tl I for year endlnp December 31, 19£U 



Disbursements 

MMMMMMMMMMMi 

Pensions paid to members retired prior 

to January 1, 19h6, under Chapter P3?, 

Acts of 1913 - Warrants ftl,on6,59?.?? 

Less - Canceled checks 13,^91.63 

Met Pensions paid - 

Chapter B3?, Acts of 1<>13 $99?, 700.59 

Pension? paid to members retired after 

January 1, 19h6, under Chapter 65 R , 

Acts of 19hS - Warrants 1P,6) p ,317.b? 

l.e*e • Canceled rhecVs 59,117j;3 

Net Pensions paid - 

Chapter 65 p , kaxe of XVip l p , 5*9,199.99 

| Total Pensions paid (Net) $19,5^1 ,900. 5* 

Reimbursements paid to City, Town, and 

County Retirement Fys terns as provided 

by fection 3(*)(c) l5,lli5.6l 

Pefunds to former members as provided 

by Chapter 531, Acts of 1957 1,033. 15 

Transfer to Military Service Credit Fund 

a/c interest deficit December 31, 1963 136.67 

Transfer to Annuity Savings Fund a/c 

reinstatement of former members - 

Chapter 531, Actr of 1957 3,011.69 

Transfer to Annuity Saving? *und a/c 

deductions required by Section 1ml) (a) 110.30 

Transfer to Annuity Reserve Fund a/c 

deficit December 31, 1963 f c ect J on tt(f)(tf)3 ?95,56P. 15 

Total *!<?,* 96, 9^6.1 5 



A true statement, made under the penalties of perjury. 




P&e'cutive Secretary 
Teachers' Petirement Board 



TFACH7PS' PrTTFF^EHT BGAHT 



^ c ■ " -r r for ye?r gglSHj^ggiSg Si 10 ^ 



Tncowe 



Page 6 



iy4 



Received from Comaonwealth by Appropriation for 
Reimbursements to Cities and Town a as required 
by Section ?0(?)(c) 



*3, 537,359. 76 



Eisbur Foments 



> 



Paid to City of Boston a/c pensions paid 
under Chapter 5P°, Acts of 190* 
Paid 12/7/61 . Tear 196?-1963 
Paid to City of Boston a/c pensions paid 
under Chapter $7\ $ Acts of 19?? 
Paid l?/7/6l - Year 196?-1963 
Paid to City of Boston a/c pensions paid 
by State-Boston Retirement System 
Paid l?/7/6U - Year 196?-lo63 

Total paid to City of Boston 

Pajd to Cities and Towns a/c pensions paid 
under Chapter ii9*, Acts of 19nPj 

Town of Brookline - Year lo*?-l<>63 
City of Cambric^e - Year 196?-lo63 
Town of Milton - Year 196?-1063 
City of Pittr'ield- Year 196?»1963 
Town of .teller ley - Yeer 1*&»1?*3 

Total Payments a/c Reimbursements 



»15*,63?.PU 

io*,ns.5i 

3,?5 p ,P3Q.h7 
3.5»,3fl.«t 



5,h5?.53 
5,657.19 
3,n55.°o 
l,?pr>.oo 



13,537,359.76 



A true statement, made under the penalties of perjury. 



> 




Sxeetftive Secretary 
Teachers* Petirement Board 



> 



TEAC?T*TS« F EME*PT BOAFT* 



EXP' r r b'i r for yrar ending fecember ?1. X°^lt 



Income 



Pape 7 



1115 



Received from Appropriations by Cmonwealth 

for Pergonal Service? and Expense* 
Less* Miscellaneous income - returned 

Total Income (Net) 



tl9li,39M6 
3. So 



*l°ti,395.36 



► 



Pi sbursements 

Salaries paid to staff of Teachers' Retirement 
Board for calendar year 1<>6U 

Contingent expenses of administration 

of Teachers* retirement Board for 

calendar year 196U 
Less j Miscellaneous income - returned 

Wet Contingent Expenses 

Total Disbursements (Net) 



iiiO,?ro.95 
3. So 



l5L,i6fl.oi 



Uo,?ftUig 



*loli,395.36 



A true statement, made under the penalties of perjury* 




{A^M 



Exeetftive Secretary 
Teachers' Retirement Board 



- 



teach: ; • . r tpement board 



MILITARY SEFV* HT F 



In cone 



Page P 



iyb 



Received from Cities and Town* - r ection 9 and 9A, 

Chapter foP 9 Act 5 of 19ll 
Peceived from Commonwealth of Massachusetts - 

Paction 9 and 9A, Chapter 7°% Act? of 19hl 
Interest on investments (less ?1,P69.£6 

accrued interest on purchases) 
Received from Pension Fund a/c interest 

deficit 1963 - Section ff(6)(ft)(Ul) 

Total Income 



«l? f 596 # S3 

10,997.31 

13*.ft7 

«3V*10.$lt 



Disbursements 



Refunds to Cities and Towns - Faction ??(h)(a) 

and Section ??(U)(c) 
Trans, to Other Retirement Fystems - Section ??(l)(d) 

Total Disbursements 



«?0,0$3.U7 
l,Oglu°l 



?T,10 ft .3 p 



Income in excess of Disbursements 



*11,*11.16 



» 



c 



> 



MILITARY SEFVICE CREDIT FUND 



Assets 



Page P-A 



Investments (par value $53k,b3h.?0) 

Amortized value 
Savings Bank Deposits 
Cash 

Accrued Interest Dec. 31, 1961* 
Due from Commonwealth - Int. deficit - Sec. 22(6) (a) (iii) 

Total Assets 



$535,697,69 

65,000.00 

3,830,1*1 

1,031.85 
1,072.33 

$609,632.28 



i 



Liabilities 

Depo?:tp and interest - City & Town Accounts 
Accumulated deductions and interest - 
members 1 accounts 

Total Liabilities 



IU7,682.$S 

56l.9U9.73 



$609,63?.?* 



I hereby certify that the above statement is a complete and correct exhibit of 
the financial condition of the Teachers* Retirement Military Service Fund of the 
Teachers* Retirement Board on the thirty-first day of December, 196U. 

A true statement, made under the penalties of perjury. 





&z4A*£e 



Executive Secretary 
Teachers* Retirement Board 



( 



. 



> 



r.?*iy irv VDm 



*?et Interest Earned In 1961 and Amount? Credited 
to City, Town, fr -e^berT" Accounts 



Pape 9 



198 



I 



Total Interest received on investments 
Accrued Interest December 31, 196U 

Total 

Accrued interest on purchases 
Accrued interest December 31, 1°63 
Total 

Balance 

Amortised value of investment? December 31, 1°^3 
Par value of investments purchased 
Savings Bank Deposit? purchased 

Total 
Investments matured 
Discount on purchases 

Total 

Balance 
A^orti74ed value of investment* 
Value of -avingf Bank repoeits 

Total 

Decrease 

Net Interest earned ( Averape rate ? # 9lt p 950 



Interest credited to account? of Cities and Towns 
Interest credited to members accounts - retired 

regular St Option (6) survivors 
Interest credited to members accounts - Sec.l?B survivors 
Interert credited to members accounts refunded to 

Cities and Towns 
Interest credited to members accounts transferred 

to i.R.9. 
Interest credited to balances of active members accounts 

Total 
Less adjurt^ent account of interest credited in 

error prior years 
*'et Interest credited to be charged a pa Inst 

interest earned 



$1,P69.56 

6,$Q5.6l 



*w,l*3.in 
97*. <6 



6$ ,onn. on 



$P7,ir>7.33 
l$V7S.6o 

p in f Qp?.P3 



Pin ,150.66 
600 9 ftt?.*7 

600/07.^9 



1, 21*6.73 
53. 9u 

ho6.*6 

33?.5<> 
16,1^.17 

lP f u<?3.06 
11.50 



1,866.90 



P,?7S.17 
17,5?3.5A 



1?5.5* 



17,3^.00 



Interert deficit to be assumed by 
P Commonwealth - Section ??(0(a5(iii) 



l*,hPl.56 
*l,oP3.56 



( 



> 



V!T T ~ SRI VT( I 5300 



Pate of Interest Earned in 1961* 



Page °-A 



±£J9 



Ledger Assets December 31, 1963s 
Investments (Amortised value) 
Caeh 

Total 



£5*7,107.33 
5,735.19 

5<>Vli?.5? 



i 



Ledger A 8 seta December 31, 106Uj 
Investments (Amortised value) 
c avinfcs Bank deposits 
Cash 

Total 



£5 35, 6*7.60 

65, oon.oo 

3, p 3Q.Ul 



6oh,5?P.lQ 
H, 107,370.6? 



Mean 



59P,6P5.3l 



Net Interest earned in 106L - 9l7»9fA«0& 



17, 39*. 00 



P ,609,00 

^5P«,9P6.31 



*at« - 17.3QP.OO « ?. 

5 p o;o>'*.ji 



( 



( 



( 



CI 



H) 



• 



SECURITI 



i 






December 31, 196l> 
Securities - (Bonds and lb tea) 
Municipal e m Massachusetts 



Description 


uate 
(Per 
Cent) 


Par Value 


Amortized Value 
December 31* 1961; 


Accrued Interest 
Decaaber 31, 1961, 


Boston, Mass* 


3 


1420,000.00 


h61*, 903^7 


1,050*00 


Boston, Mass* 


k 


171,900.00 


168,93U06 


1,719*00 


Boston* Mass* 


kk 


50,000.00 


l49,711*.09 


1,062.50 




Total 


61*1,900.00 


683,5SU32 


3,831.50 







Description 



Cleveland, Ohio 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Dee ^oines, Iowa 
Long Beach, California 
Newport, Ri;ode 1 aland 
Norwalk, Connecticut 
Norwalk, Connecticut 
Providence, Rhode laland 
San rrancisco, California 



Securities (Bonde and iotee) 
dci^alas Other States 



,<*M<<iy 



1ate~ 
(Per 
Cent) 



hi 

5 

5 

k 

| 

3 3/u 

I 

h 

hi 



Par Value 



10,000.00 

5o»ooo,oo 

25,000,00 
90,000.00 
l£),000.G0 
20,000.00 
26,000.00 
11,000.00 
75,000.00 



Ajortiaed Value Accrued Interest 

December 31, 196ii Leceuiber 31, iy6h 



10,077.10 


75.00 


;2, 226.01 


^33*33 


S&JMeSl 


I IOI4.17 


91,706.19 


I 300.00 


1#,000.0Q 


) 666.67 


19, 5tf.U 


i 156.21* 


27,725*93 


) 326.66 


10,936,64 


220.00 


77, 7a. 33 


1,687.50 



Total 



31(9,000.00 35bf6Jj6.25 



ii,36y.57 









r 






( 



'403 



fecurities (Jonds and i*ctes) 
united states Treasury 



Description 


oat* 
(Per 


Tar Value 


Amortized Value 
Deaenber 31 » 19£i* 


Accrued Interest 
December 31. 1961* 


United states Treasury Bonds 


2 i 


11,135, 000.00 


10,397,223.61; 


58,907.99 


United states Treasury Bonds 


2 }/k 


29,33.9,000.00 


29,51*6,760.86 


201, 563 .12 


United States Treasury- Bonds 


3 


14,1,29,000.00 


1*, 1*1*5, 67i*.S2 


1*9,826.25 


United States Treasury Bonds 


34 


i,O#),Q0G.0O 


1,052,197.82 


1,1*89.58 


United States Treasury Bonds 


3 3/8 


736,000 ,00 


736,000.00 


3,105.00 


United States Treasury Bonds 


9i 


10,08 5,000.00 


10,318,007.1*6 


69,1*96.87 


United States Treasury Bonds 


3 5/8 


1,350,000.00 


1,350,000.00 


6,117.19 


United States Treasury Bonds 


3 3/u 


1,350,000.00 


1,31*9,293.07 


11,015.63 


United States Treasury bonds 


k 


600,000.00 


#0,892.51* 


7,666.67 


United States Treasury Bonds 


hi 


2,000,000.00 


2,000,000.00 


10,625.00 


Total 




62,051*, 000.00 


62,286,0^.91 


1*19,818.30 



I 



Securities (8ond3 and Notes) 
Railroad Equipment 



Description 


Rate 
(Per 
Cent) 


Par Value 


Aaortiaed Value 
IJeceaber 31 • 1961* 


Accrued Interest 
December 31 f 1961* 


Atlantic Coast Line it. R. 
Equipment Trust 


hi 


300,000.00 


291*971.61* 


5,312.50 


Chesapeake & Ohio R. R. 
Equipment Bonds 


3 


300,000.00 


297, 131*. 52 


3,21*9.99 


Chicago, Burlington & Quince 
R. R. Equipment Bonds 


2 5/8 


100,000.00 


99, 52*. 55 


1,312.50 


Chicago, Burlington k Quincy 
R. R, Equipment Bonds 


3 1/3 


250,000.00 


250,150.28 


3,255.20 


Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 
R. R. Equipment Trust 


1*1/8 


500,0u0.00 


1*89,335.15 


6,875.00 


Clinchfiald R. ft. 
Equipment Trust 


k| 


250,000.00 


21*6,127.09 


1*,1*26.5U 


Gujf Mobile 4 Ohio 
B. *. Equiuaent Trust 


li 1/6 


100,000.00 


97,207.31 


1,718.75 


Missouri & Pacific R. R. 
Equipment Trust 


1*3/8 


55Q,oocoo 


51*1,222.38 


- 7,656.25 


Ibrthern Pacific R. R. 
Equipment Bonds 


3 1/8 


100,000.00 


99,99l*.09 


1,171.87 


St. Louis, San irancisco 
R. R. Equipment Bonds 


3 3/8 


100,000.00 


100,238.03 


281.25 


So. Pacific R. R. 
Equipment i3onds 


3| 


150,000.00 


11*9,656.88 


2,1*37.50 


Texas & Pacific R. R. 
Equipment Trust 


** 


300,000.00 


291*,31*0.i*5 


1*, 953. 31* 


Total 




3,000,000.00 


2,960,207.37 


1*2,655.69 



LOU 





Securities 


(Bends and Notes) 




ao5 


# 


Telep 


hone Companies 








Description 


Hate 

(Per 

Cent) 


Par Value 


Amortized Value 
December 31, 196i* 


Accrued Interest 

December 31* 1961; 


Am. Tel. & Tel. Co, 


2 5/3 


100,000.00 


98, OS?. 23 




1,312.50 


Air,. Tel. & Tel. Co. 


2 3/h 


250,000,00 


21*6,652.71* 




2,106.25 


Am. Tel, & Tel. Co. 


3* 


250,000.00 


25l*,759.9l* 




2,369.79 


Aa, Tel. & Tel. Co. 


3 7/8 


500,000.00 


511,7 51*JL3 




9,667.50 


Am, Tel. & Tel. Co. 


1* 3/B 


2,100,000.00 


2,122,566.63 




21,1145.53 


Am. Tel. 4 Tel. Co. 


1*3/1* 


100,000.00 


103,939.76 




791.67 


Bell Tel* of i'eniu 


3* 


150,000.00 


151,1*66.83 




1,625.00 


Bell Tel. of Penn. 


3 3A 


1,000,000.00 


1,015,902.61* 




15,625.00 


Bell Tel. or Penru 


1*3/1* 


800,000.00 


827,598.67 




6,333*33 


Chesapeake & Potomac Tel. Co. 


3i 


100,000.00 


102,1*56.36 




1, 351i.l7 1 



Giitisapeake & Potomac Tel. Co. 

Chesapeake & Potomac Tel. Co. 

Chesapeake & Potomac Tel. Co. 
of Maryland 

Chesapeake k i otomac Tel. Co. 
of West Virginia 

General Tel. Co. of California 

General Tel. Co. of California 

Illinois Bell Tel. Co. 

Illinois Bell Tel. Co. 

Illinois Bell Tel. Co. 

Illinois Bell Tel. Co. 

Indiana Bell Tel. Co. 

i^ghigan Bell Tel. Co. 

Michigan Bell Tel. Co. 






1*3/8 


500,000.00 


5U,076.21 


10,937.50 


5 


500,000.00 


5L0,0L7. 6k 


8,333.33 


hi 


200,000.00 


202,506.00 


3,000,00 


5 


300, 000.00 


300,000.00 


1,250.00 


3 


200,000.00 


200,962.22 


500.00 


3 1/6 


300,000.00 


301,793.73 


2,31*3.75 


hi 


250,000.00 


252,9il0.i46 


3,51*1.67 


1*3/8 


350,000.00 


35L,#0.32 


5,101*.l6 


i*3/B 


300,000.00 


305,916.87 


1,093.75 


1*3/8 


220,000.00 


25!i,971.25 


911.1*6 


1*3/1* 


825,000.00 


876,1*14.97 


6,531.26 






LA 



Securities (; and j<btes) 

- 2 - Telephone Cc _es 



206 



T - ::■:. ■':■ ;■ - 



Hate 



Par Value 



.Amortized Value 

December 31 » 1961* 



Accrued interest 

>.r ;i, 1961; 



Mountain Statei 
Tel, it Tel. Co. 

Mountain States 
Tel. * Tel. Co. 

Mountain States 
Tel. k Tel. Co. 

Mountain States 
Tel. & Tel. Co. 

Mountain States 
Tel. & Tel. Co. 

New England Tel. * Tel. Co. 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 

Hr° England Tel. & Tel. Co. 

Hew England Tel. & Tel. Co. 

Hew Jersey Bell Tel. Co. 

Hew Jersey Bell Tel. Co. 

New Jersey Bell Tel. Co. 

New Xork Tel. Co. 

New Xork Tel. Co. 

New Xork Tel. Co. 

New Xork Tel. Co. 

New Xork Tel. Co. 

Sew Xork Tel. Co. 

Hew Xork Tel. Co. 

Horthwestern Bell Tel. Co. 

Pamfic Iforthwest Bell Tel. 

Pacific Nortiweat Bell Tel. 

Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co. 



3 1/8 



3* 



1^0,000.00 


151,301.68 


1,375.00 


125,000.00 


125,605.26 


976.56 


325,000.00 


323,ii73.28 


91*7.92 



k 3/8 1*oo,goo.oo 



1*01*, 71 5. 1*1 



7 f 291*67 



5 


500,000.00 


5!0,873.U 


6,250.00 


3 


350,000.00 


355, li09. 37 


3,062.50 


!i 


1*50,000.00 


1*51*,189.1*6 


1,557.29 


k* 


500,000.00 


501*, 539.55 


11,250.00 


h 5/8 


500,000.00 


509,655.37 


5,781.25 


2 3 A 


100,000.00 


97,397.81* 


802 .08 


3 


200,000.00 


201,586.67 


1,000.00 


3 1/8 


250,000.00 


255,651.93 


3,580.73 


2 3/U 


200,000.00 


186,831.31 


2,520.83 


3 


150,000.00 


15L,307.05 


937.50 


3 1/8 


250,000.00 


251,953.35 


3,255.21 


1*1/8 


900,000.00 


919,028.33 


18,562.50 


M 


1*50,000.00 


1*53,285. 5h 


9,562.50 


i*i 


300,000.00 


301*, 636.81* 


1,687.50 


h 5/s 


1,850,000.00 


1,881*, 76 6.21 


lp,l*68.75 


i4 7/S 


500,000.00 


506,200.91 


2,031.25 


1* 3/8 


300,000.00 


301*,125.00 


1*, 375.00 


^4 


350,000.00 


31*8,928.76 


2,250.00 


2 7/3 


100,000.00 


99,231.37 


718.75 



( 



< 



( 



* 



Securities (Bonds and Notes) 
-» 3 - Telephone Corapaniee 



%in 



Eescriptlcn 



Pacific Tel. k Tel. Co. 
Pacific Tel. k Tel. Co. 
Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co. 
Pacific Tel. k Tel. Co. 
Pacific Tel. k Tel. Ct . 
Pacific Tel. ft Tel. Co. 
So. Sell Tel. k Tel. Co. 
So. Bell Tel. It Tel. Co. 
fo. BeU Tel. k Tel. Co. 
So, Sell Tel. & Tel. Co. 
ecTBell Tel. k Tel. Cc. 
Bo. Bell Tel. k Tel. Co. 
Fo. i. £. Tel. Co. 
So. N. S. Tel, Co. 
So. N. B. Tel. Co. 
Southwestern Bell Tel. Co. 
Southwestern Bell Tel. Co. 
Southwestern Bell Tel. Co. 
Southwestern Bell Tel. Co. 
Wieconrdn Tol. Co. 



Seta 
(Per 
Cent) 



Par value 



Mortized Value 
Eecemser % , 1961* 



Accrued Interest 
lecei ber 31 > 196U 



Total 



3 1/0 


200, COO .00 


202,919.57 


3* 


li0C,C00.00 


i<05,92U51 


3i 


150,000.00 


152,876.28 


3 5/8 


350,ooo.co 


357,523.91 


1*5/8 


1,100,000.00 


1,129,71*6.98 


51/3 


700,000.00 


707,829.87 


2 3A 


100,000.00 


91,717.71 


3 1/8 


200,000.00 


203,810.91 


3i 


200,000.00 


201,91*1.15 


I 


125,OCO.OO 


126,613.37 


ii 3/8 


1,700,000.00 


1,711*632.20 


1* 5/8 


250,000.00 


252,987.08 


3* 


300,000.00 


302,387.59 


iil/8 


500,000.00 


510,053.20 


1*3/8 


300,000.00 


299,250.00 


3 1/8 


250,000.00 


251*022.73 


*1 


1,050,000.00 


1,062,071.78 


1* 5/B 


100,000.00 


102,568.09 


i*3A 


1,050,000.00 


1,1C0,O50.1i3 


1*7/3 


500,000.00 


505,939.07 


29,070,000.00 


29,51*5,596.98 



701.25 

3,317.70 

656.25 

1*,757.S1 

10,U>6.25 

ll*,9l*7.92 

1,11*5.33 
2,083.33 
1,351*.17 

1,250.00 

20,1*6.67 

963.51* 

a,6Jb3.75 
6,375.00 

1,093.75 

1,302.08 

19,637.50 

1,927.03 

12,068.75 
h, 062. 50 

360,185.67 



'•0 









Oi la 

EC. v ' 



4 






. 






T XXtB ff 



™" 









U;curitit I (kernels and Ibtec) 
Public Utilities 



208 



Description 

»»«— M— m ii i< * « i i n i 



ti&XQ 

(Per 

Cent) 



Far Value 



Ae'.ortizet? Value 
Becc: bcr 31 r 1961; 



Accrued Interest 

Decenber 31.1961; 

W illi IlilWii i iiwi ifaiW <l l l il i«1 



Alabama Power Co, 
Alabama Power Co, 
Alabama Power Co, 
Alabama Power Co. 
Atlantic City Slectrlc Co. 
Atlantic City rllectric Co, 
Baltimore Us»s & Electric Co, 
Baltimore Gas k Electric Co, 
Baltimore Gas «k Electric Co, 
Boston Edison Co, 
Boston Edison Co. 
Boston Edison Co, 
Boston Edison Co, 
Brockton Edison Co, 
Carolina ^ower k Light Co. 
Carolina ;ower & Light Co. 
Central Illinois Light Co. 
Central Illinois Light Co. 
Central Illinois Public Service 
Central Illinois Public Service 
Central Maine Power Co, 
Central Seine Power Co. 
C<~ tral Power It Light Co. 



M 


200,000.00 


20<t $ tf&.i6 


2,166.67 


3 3/8 


100,000.00 


101,891.38 


8i*3.75 


3$ 


2uyX'0.00 


202*, 31*0.00 


1,895.83 


2* 1/8 


78,000.00 


79,252.79 


536.25 


i» 3/6 


250,000.00 


250,000.00 


3,6i45.o3 


111 


3C0,00O.0Q 


30^201,02 


6,750.00 


3* 


200,0)0.00 


201,253.55 


5U.67 


h 


500,000.00 


505,056.01* 


6,666.67 


i4 3/8 


500,000*00 


506,010.12 


10,026.2j0 


2 3/i* 


200,000,00 


203,173.90 


1,375.00 


3 


200,000.00 


201,773.58 


2,500.00 


3 1/8 


130,000 ,00 


150,503.58 


2,3i43.75 


4>/8 


5oo,ou>.oo 


506,636.140 


1,927.08 


• ft 


200,000.00 


200,000.00 


2,250.00 


fc| 


730,000,00 


750,111^02 


7,500.00 


i* 7/8 


500,000.00 


501,776.87 


6,093.75 


111 


5X1,000.00 


500,000.00 


7,083.33 


hl/B 


300,000.00 


298,937.^ 


14,875.00 


hi 


950,000.00 


968, 5B2 .82 


7,125.00 


ki/u 


500,000.00 


507,18U,97 


11, 87 5.00 


3 1/& 


21*6,000.00 


21*8,022.72 


6I4O.63 


3 5/8 


100,000.00 


100,727.25 


1,203.33 


1*3/1* 


500,000.00 


510,350.25 


5,937.50 






0. 


















Jc 















. 






tmnft 



. 



&JU 



Securities (Bonds and aotes) 
- 2 - habile ui es 







rate 
O'er 
Cant) 


Par v«JLue 


Amortized Value 


Accrued Inter^rt 

LectaaLer 31 • 1961* 


Central I'ower & Light Co. 
of Southern Texas 


3i 


100,000.00 


100,760.10 


X,3>l4*17 


Cleveland ^ectric Illuusinating Co. 


2 3/1* 


200,000.00 


193, 381:. 57 


1,833.31* 


Cleveland Electric IXlusinating Co. 


3 


250,000.00 


232,29/;. 31 


1,250.00 


Cleveland Electric Illuminating Cc. 


3 3/8 


10C, 000.00 


101,761.35 


261.25 


Cleveland KLectric Illuminating Co. 


3 7/8 


1*00,000.00 


1407,126.62 


5,166.67 


Celurbue & Be. Ohio Electric Co. 


3 3A 


200,000.00 


20a,a7.97 


1,875.00 


Commonwealth Edison Co. 




3 


200,GCC.OO 


200,572.00 


1,000.00 


Commonwealth ISdison Cc. 




3 3/1* 


500,000.00 


503,81*3.10 


6,250.00 


CooBnonwealth Edison Co. 




** 


200,000.00 


200,000.00 


2,833.33 


CC* jeoticut Light It rower Co. 


2 3/1* 


100,000.00 


9h,l&6.1& 


1^.33 ! 


Connecticut Light 4 Power Co. 


3 


100,000.00 


100, 8 5?. 36 


75&.GO 


Connecticut Light & Power Co. 


3 i 


290,000.00 


2149,008.95 


677.08 


Consolidated Edison 




U3/B 


600,000.00 


605,808.12 


2,137.;$ 


Consolidated Edison 




ii 3A 


500,000.00 


500,625.00 


1,979.17 


Consolidated Kdison Cc. 


of JSew lork 


2 3/14 


300,000.00 


291,635.35 


2,062.50 


Consolidated Edison Co. 


of New York 


3 i 


200,000.00 


203,813.*!* 


1,033.33 


Consolidated Edison Co. 


of Mew lork 


3 3/8 


650,000.00 


660,552.33 


7,73i*.37 


Consolidated Sdison Co. 


of New iork 


3* 


150,000.00 


152,10.9.13 


2,187.50 


Consolidated gdison Co. 


cf Blew jcork 


it 


5(0,000.00 


511,1*87.89 


1,666.67 


Consolidated Hdlson Co. 


of Mew lork 


13/8 


500,000.00 


509,231^.95 


1,022.92 


Consolidated £dieon Co. 


of Kew lork 


e 5/8 


500,000.00 


506,538.99 


3, 85i*.17 


Consolidated Edison Co. 

Consolidated Gas, Sleet) 
lit Power Co. of BaLtijaor< 


of Itew lork 


1*3/1* 


100,000.00 


10i>,06v.61* 


395.83 


Pic Light 
t, Maryland 


2 3A 


250,000.00 


21*8,022.52 


3,151.01* 












'. 





















. 



• 



m 



wuritiee (Bonds . 
• 3 ~ - uEtlG .;■: Lttft* 



aio 



I K I M 



( or 

Cent) 



Far Value 



Anortlsttd Value 

Lfe^.. .-.-/ 31 y 1961* 



boiifacixdate . Qua, ilectric Light 
* rower Co. e£ Baltlsicre, ^ar^l&nd 

Conau . 

Considers 'ower Co. 

Consumers 3 ower Go. 

Ooiiau&ere Power Co* 

Dai-' as ewer k Light Co* 

iialla*? Power & Light Co. 

Layton Power k Light 0c . 

Da/ton ower & Light Co. 

I,^P«rure .»"ower » Light Go, 

Detroit Sdi&on Co. 

Detroit JSdlsoa Co, 

Letrcit iidison Co 

Letroit Kdieon Co. 

Duquesne Light Co* 

Duquesne Light Co. 

kuquesne Light Co. 

Euqueene Light Co. 

KL Pasc Electric Co. 

II Faeo alectric Co. 

Fall River rXLectric Light Co. 

Florida rower Corp. 

J?xorida Power Corp. 



Accrued Interer 
Eacasbor 31, 19 



3 


300,000.00 


301,564.5/1 


4,125-00 


2 7/8 


300,000.00 


3^0,357.69 


2,075.00 


k 


700,000.00 


709,701.94 


11,666.67 


kt 


2£), 000.00 


258,395*13 


2,312.50 


U 5/6 


50c,oocoo 


501,oS4.00 


9,635.l£ 


li 


200,000.00 


203,231.02 


2,333.31* 


ki 


200,000.00 


2G1,4U.95 


708.33 


2 3A 


100,000.00 


101,322.62 


687. SO 


3 


250,000.00 


250,471.09 


2, >C)0.00 


3 7/3 


2SC,0CO.CO 


250,950.6^ 


307.29 


2 3A 


100,000.00 


101,551.51 


916.67 


2 7/3 


250,000.00 


2$, 615.33 


2,096.35 


3 4 


200,000.00 


200,000.00 


312.50 


3 3/8 


200,000.00 


202,01*6.53 


81*3.75 


2 3A 


300,000.00 


2^2,71*3^27 


3,437.4/ 


3 1/8 


250,000.00 


251,01 3.87 


3,906.25 


3 5/S 


100,000.00 


1C&, 423.27 


1,208.33 


3 3/li 


400,000.00 


400,603.1 1. 


3,750.00 


I i 


300,000.00 


306,71^.81 


6,375.00 


k 5/8 


5do,ooo.oo 


505,785.04 


9,635.^2 


i* 3/8 


175,000.00 


176,197.98 


1,9H.G6 


III 


5&o,ooo.oo 


500,625.00 


3, 5lil .66 


h3/k 


3CO,000.00 


309,723.05 


3,562.50 



'.. 



■ 



{ 



e> 



Securities (Bonds and Notes) 
• h - Public Utilities 



ail 



Description 



Hate 
(Per 
Cent) 



Far Value 



Amortized Value 
December 31 > 196I4 



Accrued Interest 
December 31 » I96h 



Florida lower k Light Co. 
Florida Power k Light Co. 
Georgia Power Co, 
Gulf States Utilities Co. 
Qulf States Utilities Co. 
Hartford Hlectric Light 
Houston Lighting It Power Co. 
Houston Lighting & Power Co . 
iiouston Lighting k Power Co. 
Id*ho Power Co. 
Illinois Power Co. 



Illinois Power Co. 
Indiana k Michigan Electric Co. 
Indiana k Michigan Electric Co. 
Indiana k Michigan Electric Co. 
Iowa Power k Light 
Kansas City I ower k Light Co. 
Kansas City Power It Light Co. 
Long Island Lighting Co. 
Long Island Lighting Co. 
Madison Gas k Electric Co. 
Massachusetts Electric Co. 
I ^aohusetts Slectric Co. 



1*3/8 


1400,000.00 


1£7,61j6.92 


1,1458.33 


h 5/8 


500,000.00 


510,077.814 


5,7ea.25 


2 7/8 


100,000.00 


101,678.71 


718.75 


h3/h 


500,000.00 


51C,830.7li 


U,875#00 


1*7/8 


200,000.00 


201,608.37 


14,875.00 


hi 


500,000.00 


i#6,7!8.0li 


5,312.50 


It 


100,000.00 


100,915.85 


1,083.33 


hi 


100,000.00 


101,ii25.U) 


1,875.00 


h3/h 


200,000.00 


208,535.81* 


1,583.33 


hi 


300,000.00 


300,000.00 


2,812.50 


h 


1,000,000.00 


1,022,905.00 


6,666.67 


hi 


500,000.00 


5014,093.51 


10,625.00 


3 i 


100,000.00 


102,266.63 


1,625.00 


1* 3/8 


500,000.00 


1*97,158.92 


9,lll*.58 


kVk 


100,000.00 


103,925.31* 


791.67 


U 5/8 


200,000.00 


205,360.57 


14,625.00 


2 3A 


100,000.00 


99»5it7.12 


229.17 


3* 


100,000.00 


101,935.23 


1,218.75 


3 3/8 


200,000.00 


202,21*1.53 


1,125.00 


h3/h 


250,000.00 


258,61^.62 


989.58 


hS/B 


292,000.00 


29li,300.a 


3,376.25 


3 3/8 


100,000.00 


101,871.1*2 


81*3.75 


i* 3/8 


150,000.00 


152,732.00 


2,187.50 




































~>0 it 

































• 






+& •* 



Securities (Bonds and Notes) 
~ 5 - Public Utilities 



*GrAj& 



&ate 
(Per 
Cent) 



Description 



Par Value 



Amortised Value 
Qecesber 31, 1961* 



Accrued Interest 
keceaber 31, 1961^ 



Metropolitan Edison Co* 
Metropolitan Edison Co* 
Vonongahela Power Co. , W. Va. 
Montana Power Co. 
Montana Power Co. 
Harragansett Electric 
New England Power Co. 
Hew England Power Co. 
Hew England Power Co. 
Mew York Power & Light Co. 
i*. X. State Electric 4 Gas Corp. 
K. X. State Electric k Gas Corp. 
». X. State Electric It Gas Corp. 
Niagara fcohawk Power Corp. 
Niagara kohawk Power Corp. 
Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. 
Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. 
HI agar a 5'ohawk Power Corp. 
Miagara i'ohawk Fewer Corp. 
northern States Power Co. 
northern States Power Co. 
northern states Power Co. of Minn, 
rthern States Power Co. of &inn. 



3 1/8 


100,000.00 


101,318.26 


781.25 


1*3/8 


700.OCO.00 


713,053.15 


2,552.08 


3 5/a 


100, 000,00 


101,715.60 


302.08 


2 7/8 


250,000.00 


21*6,281.80 


1,796.87 


3 1/8 


100,000.00 


101,970.02 


520.83 


3* 


1*00,000.00 


U>6,591.72 


1*, 666.66 


2 7/8 


100,000.00 


1001,357.22 


1,197.92 


3 


500,000.00 


502,767.31. 


7,500.00 


1* 5/8 


300,000.00 


308,158 J.1 


2,312.50 


2 3/1* 


200,000.00 


197,883.21* 


1,833.31* 


3i 


100,000.00 


101,799.83 


51*1.67 


3 3/8 


225,000.00 


229,199.82 


2,531.25 


1*5/8 


1*00,000.00 


1*08,268.80 


3,083.33 


2 3 A 


200,000.00 


202,166.68 


2,750.00 


3i 


200,000.00 


200,910.07 


1,625.00 


3 3/8 


200,000.00 


202,14*8.26 


562.50 


3* | 


150,000.00 


151,885.01 


2,187.50 


3 5/8 


150,000.00 


151,666.10 


906.25 


3 7/5 


300,000.00 


303,1*59.23 


968.75 


)i 3 


500,000.00 


500,000.00 


10,000.00 


J*i 


200,000.00 


202,257.69 


2,833.33 


1*3/8 


500,000.00 


507,611.65 


1,822.92 


1*7/8 


550,000.00 


562,363.57 


11,171.87 



. 


















■ 



00*<X 






. 



DO a:> 















- 



Securities (Bonds and Kotes) 
- 6 - Public Utilities 



£13 



inscription 


Rate 
(Per 
Cent) 


Par Value 


Mortised Value 
December 31* 1961* 


Accrued Interest 

fceceaber 31, 1961; 


5hio Edison Co. 


*i 


500,000.00 


505,139.16 


5,625.00 


3hio Edison Co. 


hl/h 


100,000.00 


1014,233.69 


395.83 


Dhio Power Co* 


h 5/8 


1*00,000.00 


1*09,096.11 


44,625.00 


Dklahoma Gas k Electric Co. 


3 7/8 


500,000.00 


5014,333.92 


1,60.44.58 


Pacific Gas k Electric Co. 


2 7/8 


l£0,000.00 


3914,717.38 


958.33 


Pacific Gas k Electric Co. 


3 


125,000.00 


126,622.014 


312.50 


Pacific Gas k Electric Co. 


3 1/8 


350,000.00 


3^)2,610.06 


911.445 


Pacific Qas k Klectric Co. 


3 3/8 


300,000.00 


306,237.71 


8i<3*75 


Pacific Gas k Electric Co* 


3 3/1* 


100,000.00 


xoi,oea.59 


312.50 


Pacific Gas U Electric Co. 


hi 


1,000,000.00 


1,001,692.93 


3,51*1.66 


Pr^ic Gas k Kleotric Co. 


1*3/8 


200,000.00 


200,000.00 


729.17 


Pacific Gas k KLectric Co. 


hi 


1,112,000.00 


1,120,4450.66 


44,170.00 


Pacific Power k Light Co. 


1*3/8 


100,000.00 


100,000.00 


729.17 


Pennsylvania Electric Co. 


3 1/8 


200,000.00 


202,4i5L.25 


2,083.33 


Pennsylvania Electric Co. 


3 3/8 


200,000.00 


202,186.28 


1,607.50 


Pennsylvania Electric Co, 


3 7/8 


150,000.00 


153,180.57 


966.75 


Pennsylvania Electric Co. 


1*1/8 


100,000.00 


101,613.73 


31*3.75 


Pennsylvania Power 


2 7/B 


100,000.00 


96,595.31 


4479.17 


Philadelphia Klectric Co. 


2 3A 


100,000.00 


99,l4l4l*.56 


4458.33 


Philadelphia &Leotric Co. 


2 7/8 


350,000.00 


31*0,819.96 


44,192 .71 


Philadelphia Electric Co. 


3 1/8 


300,000.00 


29^,930.30 


781.25 


Philadelphia Electric Co. 


3 t 


50,000.00 


50,325.81* 


&2.50 


Philadelphia Electric Co. 


3 y/k 


500,000.00 


li98,9Q1.77 


3,125.00 


d 














:• 
























t w\^ 









; 






^■F " 



Leeurities (ftMMtal ana too tee) 



ZiA 



^ 


•7 


- ttiolic utili 


10.88 




description 


Rate 
(Per 

Cent) 


rar Vialue 


JWortiaed Value 
Eecaaber 31, 196i« 


Accrued Interest 

Deeper 31. 1961, 


< 
1 Philadelphia Electric Co. 


1* 3/8 


500,000.00 


500,000.00 


1,322.92 


Philadelphia Slectric Co. 


hi 


600,000.00 


60l<, 8514.7 It 


1*, 500.00 


[Philadelphia KLectric Co. 


k 5/8 


Ij00,000.00 


1411,000.00 


6,166.67 


Potomac rjectric Power Co. 


2 3/1* 


300,000.00 


302,326,32 


1,375.00 


Potoaac Electric Power Co. 


3 3/8 


150,000.00 


153,223.00 


1*21.87 


Potomac Electric Power Co. 


1*3/8 


5oo,ooo.uo 


507,908.01* 


1*,101.56 


Jbtowac Electric Power Co. 


hi 


650,000.00 


650,12 5.00 


3,656.25 


Potomac Electric Power Co. 


h 5/8 


l£0,000.00 


1*1 14,629.1*9 


1,51*1.66 


Potomac Electric hxwer Co. 


5 


100,000.00 


105,966.91* 


MA 


Pi^\*ic Service Electric &. Oaa 
CcT 


i* 3/8 


1,500,000.00 


1,509,656.08 


12,Y60.i*2 


Public Serri«e riectric & Gas 
Co. 


1*3 A 


700,000.00 


715,1*67.77 


11,083.31* 


Public Terrice Co. of Colorado 


hi 


500,000.00 


501,61 k£3 


1,375.00 


Puolic Service Co. of Indiana 


3 3/8 


150,000.00 


152,1*87.51 


2,531.25 


Public Service Co. of Indiana 


h 3/8 


500,000.00 


901,833.89 


9,lH.58 


Public Service Co. of N. H. 


3* 


125,000.00 


127,610.66 


677.08 


Public Cervice Electric & Gae 
Co. oi* a. J. 


3i 


600,000.00 


606,195a h 


l*,60l*.17 


Public Service iU.eotric It Cas 
Co. oX H. J. 


i* 5/8 


500,000.00 


> 509,002.71* 


9,635.1*2 


So. Calif. EoU son Co. 


2 7/8 


250,000.00 


21*7,737.25 


2,695.31 


So. Calif. Edison Co. 


3 


150,000.00 


150, 528.91; 


1,637.50 


So. Calif. Sdioon Co. 


3 1/8 


350,000.00 


353,185.iiL 


4,752.60 


So^walif . Sdison Co. 


3 5/8 


300,000.00 


299,326.61* 


3,1*73.96 


So. Calif. Sdison Co. 


hi 


200,000.00 


200,500.00 


1,&6.67 


So. Calif. Edison Co. 


4 3/8 


1,500,OU).00 


1,1*98,1*59.16 


17,318.16 



, 
























M 



An 









t *i 



■ 












Securities (tx>uos and j«vee) 
- 8 - Public Utilities 



'415 





Tiaie" 










(Par 




iiaortiaed Value 


Accrued Interest 


rv c re ration 


Cent) 


: ar Value 


Deccr.ber 31, 196^ 


iJsco^L^i* A, 196L 



So. Calif, Edison Co. 

So. Calif. £dison Co. 

So utnwe stern Gas & Electric Co. 

Xs&pa Electric Co« 

Tampa iiiuctric Co. 

Texas Kieetric service 

Texas rower & Light Co. 

Texas Power fc Light Co. 

Union Electric Co. 

Un-ion E3.ec trie Co. 

Utah Power & Light Co. 

Virginia Klectric & Poser Co. 

Virginia Kiectric & Power ^o # 

Virginia Kiectric & lower Co. 

Virginia Electric 4c Power Co. 

1r Penn. rower Co. 

!• Penn. Power Co. 

¥»• Poiin. Power Co. 

Wisconsin i&ectriu Jfawt Co. 

Wisconsin Electric Power Cc. 

Wisconsin Electric iower Co. 

Wisconsin, Michigan Power Co, 

W* jpnsin Power & Light Co. 



a 1 


300,000.00 


303,267.12 


3,375.00 


k3/h 


200,000.00 


206,257.1*1 


1*,750.00 


h 5/8 


100,000.00 


loa,731i.23 


2,312.5b 


«i 


500,000.00 


5H,21iii.68 


10,625.00 


ki 


500,000.00 


508,61*1.08 


3,750.00 


1*3/8 


5oo,ooo # eo 


501*, 438.12 


5,1*63.75 j 


i* 3/8 


500,000.00 


511,838.86 


9,U1*.58 


hi 


300,000.00 


302,666.1*3 


1,125.00 


hi 


1400,000.00 


ta,yi5.9i 


3,000.00 


fcjA 


800,000.00 


821,16b .99 


17, 1*16.67 


3 5/8 


100,000.00 


101,623.17 


1,200.33 


3 7/8 


500,000.00 


50i*,223.13 


1,61*4.58 


1*3/8 


500,000.00 


502, all*. 50 


3,6u5.83 


hi 


500,000.00 


502,1409.19 


1,375.00 


1*5/8 


500,000.00 


503,358*03 


7,708.33 


2 7/8 


100,000.00 


97,766.72 


953.33 


»4 


100,000.00 


102,002.92 


&2.50 


kft 


5co,ooo.oo 


505,l*7iu23 


7,500.00 


3 1/8 


150,000 # 00 


152,730.33 


731.25 


3 7/8 


250,000.00 


253,815.81 


2,018.23 


1*1/3 


500,000.00 


510,912. a 


5,156.25 


3 1/8 


100,000.00 


100,569.32 


651. 01* 


1* 5/8 


1*89,000.00 


1*91,1*52.11 


7,538.75 









( 









Securities (Bonds and He tea) 
- 9 - Public Utilities 



£Jt 



Description 



Wisconsin Public »**rvice Co. 
Worcester Gas & Light Co, 



" ■ ■■ ' 

Bate 

(Per 

Cent) 



hi 

Si 



Par Value 



900,000.00 
180,000.00 



Anortised Value 

December 31 , 196h 

903,759.92 
182,722.09 



Accrued Interest 
December 31, 196k 



3,375.0f) 
787.50 



Total 



6l,9i47,00O # 0O 62,569,597.62 



626,7ii2.82 






• 



Securities (iionds and States) 
Industrials - Corporations 






Rate 



• 



Riicripticn 

I II I T I I mm*m .» 



Par Vcduc 



Aacrtizea value 



Accrued Interest 

1962* 



-*-» 
j>i- 



~ 



Aluminum Co. of America 

Jordan Go, 

General Motors 

Ki nneapol i s-ib neywell 
Regulator Co. 



Hational Dalr> Products 
Proctor &. Gamble 
Sears Boebuck & Co. 
United States Steel Corp* 
United State 8 Jteel Corp. 



Total 



2*3/8 
3 I 



100,OCG.'^ 
200,000.00 
200,000.00 



1U),GOO.OO 
l?7,6i2.5i 
201,963.03 



2,125.00 

729 .17 

3,250.00 



111 


700,000,00 


6yB f i*3L.23 


12,395.83 


li 3/B 


1U),000.00 


ic&,675.2*o 


1,276.01* | 


3 7/8 


500,000.00 


1462,85^.79 


6,1*58.33 I 


2*3/2* 


1,100,000,00 


l,13l*,362.1*0 


21,770.81* 1 


it 


500,000.00 


502,085.1*7 


9,166.67 


hi 


142*0,000.00 


1*146,916.81 


1*,125.00 




3,81*0,000.00 


3,865,91*6.68 


61,296.88 






It 

\ r ;5 

■« to* 






"} 



CecuriUas (Souda and totes) 
Industrials - Oil Companies 



<1H 



zrlptd 



"Hate" 
(<rer 
^«a0 > 



karat:X>n Oil Co, 

Shell Oil Co. 

Socoiv Lobil Oil Co. 

ft&ndard Cil Co. of California 

Standard Cil Co. o£ Indiana 

Standard Oil Cc. oi i*©w Jersey 

Surra/ fc. X. Oil Co. 



**r * ■■ . ■»■ 



Aaortiaeo Value Accrued Interest 
- ■■ er 31, jy6ij i-ucc. ... 31, I>'6C, 



Total 



1*3/8 


000,000.00 


-lo,yo3.33 


0,7pO.uo 


1*5/8 


5oo,ooo,c*o 


jLl 9 0t&.lX 


9,633.^ 


i,i 


6oo,oco.co 


601,707.14 


6,375.00 


1*3/8 


800,000,00 


800,569.12 


17,500.00 


fci 


762,000,00 


770,766.84 


8,#2.# 


2 3/1* 


100,000.00 


101,293.85 


1,260.1*2 


hi 


750,000.00 


7 a, 788 .29 


5,332.50 




1,312,000.00 


li,3i<6,078.30 


57,tf5#81» 









«18«& 










.'ecurities (iionds and litotes) 



banks 



Zli) 



Description 


Rate 
{?er 
cent) 


far Value 


Amortized Value 

ieceaauer 31, 1961* 


Accrued interest 

I*oe£&«r 31. 1961* 


1 inker's Trust Co. 


hi 


768,000.00 


768,000.00 


1,4*10.00 


Central National Bank 
\o£ Cleveland 


h3/h 


350,000.00 


350,000.00 


1,335.1*2 


Crocker-Citizens 
1 National Bank 


1*.60 


$00,000.00 


1*99,121.00 


5,7 50.00 


Inter-Assert can 
1 Development Bank 


hi 


50,000.00 


l*9,51*i*.21 


375.00 


1 Inter naticnal Bank for 
Reconstruction & Development 


hi 


100,000,00 


98,523.1*3 


708.33 


International Bank lor 
Reconstruction & Development 


hi 


100,000.00 


100,000.00 


1,875.00 j 


Wells largo 


hi 


200,000.00 


200,000.00 


2,625.00 


•« 

total 


2,068,000.00 


2,065,188.61* 


11*A58.75 



J 



Securities (Bonds and tfctes) 



230 



^ 



Description 



•" . ••• ." ■■■ ' 
aate 

(?er 
Cent) 



Pur Value 



Wass. Turnpike Author! + 3. 30 

Total 



Grand To tall 

Deposits s 
Bass River tarings bank 
Cape Cod Five Cents Savings Bank 
City Savings Bank - Pitlsfield 
South Boston Savings Bank 
Union Savings B a nk 
Steetfield Savings Bank 

Total Deposits 



50/000. CO 
50,000.00 



Amortized Value Accrue Interest 

jgceobT 31. 19614 December 31. 196 k 

50,000.00 



50,000,00 



167,331,900.00 168,726,863.07 



100,000.00 

100,000.00 

50,000.00 

150,000.00 

150,000.00 
50,000.00 

600,000.00 



100,000.00 
100,000.00 

50,000.00 
150,000.00 
150,000.00 

50,000.00 

600,000.00 



275.00 
275.00 

1,590,760.02 






. 






jfa»J SKllWl 









) 



December 31, 196I1 
Fecurities (Bonds and Hbtes) 
tfllitery Service 



22J 



Description 



U. S. Treas. Bonds 
U. .«-:. Treae. Bonds 
U. £. Treas. Bonds 
0* £. Treas. Bonds 
U, i« Treas. Bonds 
U. S. Treas. Bonds 
U. 5. Treas. Hills 



oate 
(Per 

Gent) 



Par Value 



2 3/k 


271,000.00 


>l 


55,000.00 


3 3/8 


',000,00 


31 


15,000.00 


3 5/8 


50,000.00 


a 


100,000.00 


3.726 


29, iJa.ao 



A&ortised Value 
Decanter 31, X9&k 



273,260.81 

>2i,i&.li7 
lit, 000.00 

15,1*61.74 
50,000.00 
99,00-6.87 
29,Ulu80 



Accrued Interest 

December 31, ly61t 



1,863.13 

59.06 
73.12 

226.56 
1,500.00 

235.50 



) 



Total 



53li,ij3i4.80 



535,697.69 



h, 031. 85 



Deposits* 

Peoples federal Savings 
and Loan Assoc. 



65,000.00 



65,000.00 



Total Deposits 



65,000.00 



65,000.00 



■ 















tbfli 
■hn< 












Wiaoq# 



) 






Insurance Compaq Stocks 



«*« S>> 



Pessrlpticn 



as c£ Eccesu/er 31* 19 6i* 



Hanover insurance Co* 



91,Q50.OO 



yl,S#) # 00 



total: 



91, 850,00 



91, 850.00 



1^3 



^ 



school building assistance COMMISSION 

YEAR BHDBiG JUHB 30* 1965 

PROJECTS APPROVED 

A» ttt June 30, 1965, the Commisaion had approved 
1,343 school conatruction projecta, 323 to 38 citlee, 961 in 
269 towne, 36 in 43 regional achool dietricta, and 3 in 3 
countiee. The total of the eetimated approved eoata 
(exclusive of the coats of alte acquisition) of theae 1,343 
projects ia about $969*800,000; the total atate aid win be 
about $381, 100,000. 

STATE CGNSTRUCTIQ« GRAMS 

Aa of June 30, 1965# the Comraleelon had certified 
payment* of $145,336*643.42 on 1,297 approved projccte, 312 in 
38 eitiea, 928 in 268 towns, 55 in 43 regional achool districts, 
and 2 in 2 countiee. The total of the estimated approved coats 
of these 1,297 projects ia about $923,400,000; the total atate 
aid will be about 1357,300,000. 

REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS 

Aa of June 30, 1965, f ifty-eix regional achool 
districts had been eatabliahed in Maaaachusette. Three were 
establiahad elnce July 1, 1964. forty-one regional achoola 
were in operation, of which fifteen had additions completed or 
under construction; five new regional achoola were under 
conat ruction; eight were at various planning atagea; and two 
regional achool diatricta were defunct. 

LEGISLATION 

Chapter 572 of the Acta of 1965 was approved by 
Governor Volpe on June 28, 1965* Section 42 of this act 
abolishes the School Building Assistance Commiasion and 
tranafera its powera, duties, llabUltiaa, and employeee to the 
Department of Education; this section ia to take effect upon 
the appointment of the initial m e mbers of the new eleven 
Board of Education. 



* 



RECEIVED 
SEP 2 91PR5 

OFFICE OF 

director, research m 



1 



I 



ANNUAL REPOHT 

DIVISION OF SCHOOL LUNCH PROGHAMS 

Year Ending June 30, 1965 



The National School Lunch Act states It is hereby declared to be 
the policy of Congress as a measure of national security to safeguard the 
health and well-being of the Nation's children and to encourage domestic 
consumption of nutritious agricultural commodities and other food by 
assisting the States through grants in -aid and other means, in providing 
an adequate supply of foods and other facilities for the establishment 
maintenance, operation and expansion of non-profit school lunch programs. " 

To carry out the intent of the act the Office of School Lunch provides 
the greatest possible service by utilising all practicable resources -distri 
buting Section 6 and 32 commodities, personal contacts with school author* 
ities, record keeping, auditing and accounting, operation of workshops for 
instruction and demonstration, nutrition consultants, approval of equipment 
to be pur based, consultation and approval of that portion of the building 
plans relating to the food service facilities. 

This office has the following sections which carry out the above 
tasks. Accounting, Administration, Auditing, Distribution and Nutrition. 

The Legislative authority for the administration and operation of the 
National School Lunch Program in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by 
the Department of Education and the cities and towns of the Commonwealth 
is contained in Chapter 548 of the Acts of 1948 as amended. This act was 
designed to implement the operation of the School Lunch Programs in the 
Schools of the Commonwealth under the provisions of the National School 
Lunch Act and to provide, as necessary, funds to supplement Federal 
fUnds. The Office of School Lunch Programs, with the approval of the 
Commissioner, shall designate rules and regulations governing the oper- 
ation of the program and shall require such audits, surveys and Adminis- 
trative reviews as may be necessary to determine whether the agreements 
and other regulations are being complied with and to ascertain that s hool 
lun h programs are effectively executed. 

The school enrollment continues to increase whi h ne essitates 
building iv w schools with afeterias so that the fis al y^ar of July 1, 1964 
to Jfcne 30, 1963 shows great expansion for the thr ?e programs, Dire t 
Distribution, Special Mil* and School Lun h. 

As in former years the program operation ontinues to improve in 
that the meals ire more nutritionally balan d and th* use of tis ait d 
States Department of Agriculture commodities has been expanded. This 



a 



» 2 - 

office has offered many servi nm whi h hav.* been accepted by school 
administrators and s hool lunch personnel. Acceptan ;.e by s hool admini- 
strators of the philosophy that the school lunch is part of edu ational 
program has ontributed to the growth and finan ial support of the program. 
It is to be noted that this acceptance reveals a greater number of ities and 
towns are now assuming the salaries of school lunch supervisors as well as 
paying for rent, light and equipment. 

This is the fourteenth year that the Stats Legislature, through the 
enactment of Chapter 538 has p -ovided for the payment of defi ienciea 
between the amounts available for the Federal allotments and the maximum 
amounts which could be paid to s hools. Through this enactment it has 
been made possible to establish a ash reimbursement poll y of $, 09 for 
all type "A" meals. For the Fiscal Year 1963 $3, 816. 015. 93 was paid to 
the s hools in reimbursement payments from the State S hool Lun h Partial 
Assistance Appropriations. 

Although the cost of food is rising and salary increases have b*en 
granted to school personnel the price of the "A" meal to the children 
remains at 25$. This has been possible be ause of the large quantities 
of commodities pu chased by th a United States Department of Agri ulture. 
Other than the usual amount of frozen turkey and chicken pur has s, 
frozen ground beef and roasts were purchased in au h large quantities 
j that they were available for th* entire school year. 

APMIMSTRA [ION SEC HON 

In this fiscal year we were without the servi.es of two field nutri- 
tionists and had to request the supervisors in some of the larg.r prog ami 
to omplete Administrative Reviews for their programs. Combining th 
reviews of our nutritionists and s hool supervisors th total for the y HI • 
was 302. We are required to complete 462 Administrative Reviews by 
the United States Department of Agri ulture. 

All the field auditors positions have been filled resulting in ou 
being able to audit school lunch programs in all se tions of the state as 
well as assisting the s hool lun h personnel in properly ompleUng re- 

ords and reports. One position of fi Id nutritionist in Worcester County 
has been vacant for most of the y ar. This position has been filled so our 
nutritionists are available to serve all the schools in the various ounti 
In the state. The position of Supervisor of Edu ation is still unfilled. It 
has been a very diffi ult year to obtain typists and stenographers fo the state 
offi e. This problem was temporarily alleviated in May when three girls 
were obtained for the summer months. 

j There has been onsiderable expansion in the distribution of ommodi- 

ties to the needy. The City of Boston with a aseload of 20, 000 families 



!■• 

opened their first distribution center in April. Since this time three more 
centers have opened in various parts of the t ity. The cities of Gardner, 
Maiden, Cambridge and Easthampton are also new in the program. This 
makes a total of eighteen cities or towns now in the program. 

The printing section made a total of 1, 673, 850 impressions during 
the fiscal year. 

This year the Federal Government sponsored a so called Anti- 
Poverty Program from which originated the Headstart Program to benefit 
children who would be entering school in September. This program has 
multi -purposes but primarily to acquaint the children with school work in 
the first grade, learn to plan and study with other children etc. These 
hildren are usually from families with an income of Use than $3, 000. 00. 

If th* Program is sponsored by the s hool department and a Type 
"A" meal is served this office will allow a reimbursement of $. 09 for 
tach meal served as well as issue the commodities that are available. 
For all milk served (other than with the "A") two cents will be reimbursed. 
If the sponsor is other than the school department it is given the classifi - 
ation of a Child Care Program which will entitle them to the two cents for 
ea.h half pint of milk served and whatever commodities they an use. As 
June is the first month for this program we do not know how extensive it 
will be but early indications are that erery ity and the large sise towns 
will participate. 

During the year this section performed all duties and functions re- 
lating to the operation, supervision and responsibility of the programs, 
under the guidance of thfc United States Department of Agriculture. 

ACCO UNTING, AUDIT AND STATISTICAL SECTION 

During the 1965 fiscal year 2, 671 public and private schools 
throughout the state submitted monthly claims for reimbursement. These 
claims were audited and approved for payment by our internal audit staff. 
Invoice warrants were prepared, authorising the State Treasurer to issue 
approximately 900 checks each month. 

This office has contracts with 309 sponsoring agencies, who, during 
the summer period, maintain Summer Camps, Day Camps, Nursery 
Schools, and Child care Canters. These non-profit organisations re- 
ceived reimbursement for each half -pint of milk served to children. 

The Federal -State plan of operation requires that every school 
program be analyzed once a year to ascertain whether or not an excess 
balance of funds has accrued to each program. To comply with this re- 
quirement, the internal auditors must compile an Income Statement and 






BaUa^e Sheet for each program. These statements are used as a basis 
for assigning our field auditors. 

An annual statistical report was prepared and edited by this office 
which compiled the participation percentages in the National School Lunch 
Program and Special Mil* Program for every „ity and town. The figures 
for each community were grouped according to the fourteen counties. The 
report reflects data on the following items: average daily attendance; 
total lunches served; total half -pints of milk served; total reimbursement 
payments to each city and town; and the total weight and value of United 
States Department of Agriculture commodities for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1964, 

The average State -wide participation percentage for lunches was 
65. 25% and 94,41% for milk. 

The Statistical report was sent to all Superintendents of Schools, 
and provides them with an opportunity to compare statistics for their 
community with others of like size. This report contains valuable In- 
formation when fiscal and other program policies are being considered 
locally. 

During the fiscal y -ar, 135 audits were completed by our field 
auditors. In gom. audits, it was necessary to prepare detailed food 
analysis, determining the quantity of food used and prices paid. This 
procedure was followed to insure that ths program under audit had pur- 
chased sufficient foods, by type, to comply with National School Lunch 
regulations. 

A copy of the auditor's findings, in summary form, was returned 
to each Superintendent together with a letter indicating to the Superintendent 
that the profit or loss from operations, the net worth of the program, the 
percentage of participation, the ratio of food, labor and other expenses to 
a dollar of income. Also, any program deficiencies were outlined in this 
letter. 

In addition to auditing lunch programs, the field auditors visit schools 
serving milk only, and summer camps in order to review the operations 
for compliance under the Special Milk Program. 

The field auditors attended two one -week seminars at the University 
of Massachusetts and Stonehill College as well as a three day School Lunch 
Workshop in Boston. By attendance at these functions, the auditors were 
able to assist those in attendance in their individual fiscal problems as well 
as assisting in the many chores necessary to a successful meeting. 

During the 1963 fiscal year, 2, 671 schools participated in the National 



m 

School Lunch and/or Special Milk Program, representing 338 cities and 
towns in the Commonwealth out of 351 or a program average of 96. 2%. 

Under the National School Lunch Program, 72, 883, 849 "Type A" 
Lunches were served to the children during the 1985 fiscal year. This 
represents a gain of 5, 923, 148 "Type A" Lunches or an increase of 8. 8% 
over the 1964 fiscal year. Cash reimbursements for the number of 
lunches served during the same period amounted to $6, 457, 958. 35 or 
9. 3% increase over the prior fiscal year. 

A total of $3, 713, 407. 35 or 57. 5% was expended from State appro- 
priations in the payment of School Lunch Claims, with the remaining $ 
$2, 744, 551. 00 or 42. 5% from Federal allotments. 

Under the Special Milk Program, 107, 542, 788 half -pints of whole, 
white, unflavored milk served to children as a separately priced item. 
This figure does not include 72, 874, 200 half -pints served as a part of 
the "Typ* A 1 ' lunch. 

A total of 8102, 608. 58 or 2. 9% was expended from State appropria- 
tions in the payment of Special Milk Program claims, with the remaining 
$3, 336, 697. 28 or 97. 1% from Federal Allotments. 

For both programs. National School Lunch Program and Special 
Milk Program, $9, 897, 264. 21 was expended from Federal-State funds 
in the payment of claims to schools in the Commonwealth representing 
an increase of $501, 772. 38 or 5. 3% over the 1964 fiscal year. 

Table I indicates the comparitive figures for the 1943-1944 (first 
year of the program) and the 1950-1951 to the 1964-1965 fiscal years, 
in public and private schools combined. 

Table II indicates the scope of the National School Lunch, Special 
Milk, and Commodity Distribution Programs as it pertains to income 
from all sources connected with the program. 

COMMODITY DISTRIBUTION SECTION 

The Commodity Distribution Program functions sre to secure, 
store and distribute commodities made available by the United States 
Department of Agriculture to Schools, Institutions, Child Care Centers, 
Summer Camps, and Welfare Departments. These foods must be dis- 
tributed in accordance with rules and regulations, set up by the Federal 
and State Governments. 

To comply with the regulations, we have four warehouses located 
in three cities to provide storage for the cars of commodities that require 



r<£<J(S 






i 



%& * 



either dry or cold storage, 

A schedule la maintained showing the zneximuro amount of a eoznmod 
ity that is allowed per child or per person. This schedule is lb* guids used 
when monthly commodity orders ar filled. Restricting the quantity wanted, 
in proportion to tfes amount in inventory, the stock in the storeroom will be 
hold to s minimum, thereby preventing deterioration and spoilage at the 
school or institution. 

Va thr 1994-65 fiscal year, in* total amount of commodities distributed 
was 32, 331, 066 pounds having a value of $11, 324, 716. 10. This represents 
S34 freight cars and trudiload shipments arriving at our warehouses in 
various sections of the state, an increase of 136 cars over the prior year. 

The United States Department of Agriculture pu* hascd larger quan- 
tities of Frosen Turkeys, Froasn Cut-Up chickens, and FfiiSli Boneless 
ii. These high protein foods are the most desired as well as the most 
helpful from a financial stand point. 

The commodities distributed in Fiscal Year 1963 to all categories by 
this of f i e included. 



Butter, Print 
Cheese, Natural 
Cheese, Processed 
Lard 

Margarine 
Frosen Turkeys 
Frosen Cut -Up Chickens 
Frosen Boneless Beef 
Frosen Boneless Koast 
Cd. Boned Chicken 
Cd. Chopped Meat 
Cd. Pork in Nat. Juices 
Cd. Beef w/ Nat. Juices 
Cd. Peanut Butter 



Fresh Plums 
Cd. Purple Jrlums 
Date Pieces 
Cd. Peaches 
Cd. Pineapple 
Cd. Red Cherries 
Cd. apricots 
Cd. Applesauce 
Cd. Sliced Apples 
Cd. Dr. Prunes 
Cd. Green Peas 
Cd. Sweet Potato s 
Cd. Tomatoes 
Cd. Tomato Paste 



Cd. Green Beans 

Cd. Corn 

Cd. Ripe Pitted Olives 

Milled Rice 

Dr. Pea Beans 

Bread Flour 

A. P. Flour 

W. W. Flour 

EoUed Wheat 

Corn Meal 

Corn Grits 

Dr. £ggs 

Dr. Milk 

Dr. Split Peas 



" 



- 



- 7 - 



asw 



% 



MASTER SHEET OF WEIGHTS AND VA LUE 
July 1, 1064 - June 30, 1965 



Public Schools 



State Schools 



Private and Public Institutions 



State Institutions 



Child Care and Summer Camps 



Welfare 



POUNDS 
22, 500, 996 
1,554,007 
1,425,471 
2,425,915 
667, 662 
2,817,012 



32,231.066 



VALUE 
$9,101,771.15 
418, 154. 20 
450, 068. 25 
801,981.95 
190, 830. 55 
861,910.00 
TlC 824," 716.T0 



The Caseload in schools and summer camps continue to show an in- 
crease. The Direct Distribution Program Welfare serving the Needy 
Families is now serving commodities to 51, 571 needy persons compared 
to last years figure of 14, 938 needy persons. 



. 



NUTR ITION SEC TIQN 

The Naa-i iou Section, as in past years, continued to promote greater 
student participation in the lunch programs and to encourage more nutrition 
education activities in classrooms through administrative reviews, training 
programs and public relations. 

The staff of Nutritionists completed 332 Administrative Reviews and 
lunch analyses. To complete those reviews, lunch programs are visited, 
evaluated and technical assistance or advice is given to the school adminis- 
trators, teachers and school lunch personnel wherever needed to improve, 
enhance or promote the program. 

In order to extend the number of schools reviewed this year, a project 
which is successful in many other states, was tried on an experimental 
basis. Administrative reviews and lunch analyses were sent to a selected 
list of school lunch supervisors for them to analyse their own programs. 

The results were favorable and 170 reviews were returned. Because 
of these, a total of 502 schools were reviewed during the year. 



r 



r 









<53! 



One of the most important functions of the Nutrition section U to 
plan, promote and execute training programs to provide technical knowledge 
to school lunch personnel enabling them to keep abreast with current needs 
and to progress with their growing responsibilities. 

In August, the first summer training program for cooks, bakers and 
general workers was inaugurated and conducted for one week on the campus 
of Stonehill College, North Easton. It was an unique program open to public, 
private and parochial schools sponsored by the Office of School Lunch Pro- 
grams and the Archdiocese of Boston in cooperation with the Food Research 
Center at Stonehill College. 

Training Makes The Difference" was the theme of the conference and 
featured baking and food preparation demonstrations by two outstanding per- 
sonalities. Mr. Joseph Amendola, Dean, Culinary Institute of America, 
New Haven, Connecticut presented the baking demonstrations and Mr. Lois 
M. Bartenbach, Research Chef, General Foods Corporation, New York, 
presented the food preparation demonstrations. 

A capacity audience of 300 attended the conference and we are hopeful 
that this will become an annual training program for general school lun h 

workers. 

In October, eight School Lunch Meetings were held in conjunction with 
the County Teachers Association Meetings. The theme of the meetings was 
"Expanding the School Lunch Program". Demonstrations and le tu es 
stressed the importance of expanding the lun b program to ret h more 
students and illustrated how this ould be achieved. 

In April, our plans for the annual 3 day Area Spring Workshops were 
sltered to fit the needs of the communities. As msny ernes and towns in 
Western and Central Massachusetts did not close for a week s vacation, it 
was necessary to ondu t 1/2 day "Compact Slse" Workshops in Berkshire, 
Hampden, Franklin, Hampshire and Worcester Counties. 

In Boston, a three day workshop was held with an audience of 316 
p« eons. This workshop arried on the theme "Expanding the School Lunch 
Program" and featured demonstrations, panel discussions and information 
on nutrition activities. 

The Summer Conference for Supervisors and Managers was held st 
the University of Massachusetts during the week of June 28 - July 2, 1965. 

"Fun lions of School Food Service Management" was the theme of 
this Conference. Enrolled in either the Advan ed Course, First Year 
Course or Basic Course, 170 Supervisors and Managers ompleted the 



( 



( 



- 9 - 

courses and were awarded ertificates at the conclusion of the Confirmee, 

Another form of supplementary training and instruction for School 
Lunch Personnel is provided by the Massachusetts S hool Lunch Newsletter 
which is edited by the Nutrition Section and mailed to 1800 a hool administra- 
tors and school lunch personnel ea h month. In this publication are articles 
pertinent to the efficient management of school lunch rooms, menu and recipe 
suggestions, n«ws of government donated foods, ac ounting notes, reports of 
nutrition education proje is and a tori * of local olor and interest. 

The Nutritionists continue to ooperate w^th Sup rintendents, building 
committees architects and kitchen consultants in offering assistance with 
plans, layouts and equipment in order tc givo the communities the most 
fun tional food service facilities for long range efficiency and i onomy in 
meeting their present and future needs. 

This year the Regulations Governing the Operation of the National 
School Lunch Program, issued by this offi e, included a paragraph requesting 
that first and final drafts of new food services fa ilities be submitted to this 
office for review, comment and approval. Plans for 60 schools were received 
and reviewed during the year. 

The story of the a- hool lunch program was effectively told to the publi 
when all communities throughout the Commonwealth joined in celebrating 
National School Lunch Week. 

The seven day period beginning on the second Sunday of O tober in 
each year has been designated by proclamation as National School tun h 
Week to be observed with ceremonies and activities designed to in, cease 
the public understanding and awareness of the sign if I an * of the school 
lunch program to the hild, to the home, to the farm, to industry and to the 
Nation. 

Other efforts to increase publi. relations were made by th Nutrition 
Staff by participating in local television programs, addressing Parent- 
Teacher Associations, business man s organizations, student assemblies 
and serving on inter -agency nutrition study committees and anti-pov 
program ommittees. 



- 10 - 



ATTENDANCE AT TRAINING PROGRAM 



1935 - 196-5 



County S. L. Spring Workshops Summer Conferences 

Year Meet ings Ea a ty r n _ C en t^al We stern jlv. of f^as 3ton^ hlll 

238 

558* 1 198 

211 
279 

350 

3 
210* 

183 

188 

140 

170 300* 8 



* First Spring Workshop 

2 

* First Spring Workshop in Western Ares 

* Location of Conference changed from Fitchburg State College to 
University of Massachusetts. Enrollment limited to Supervisors 
Managers only. 

** First Spring Workshop in Central Area 



1955-56 


1209 


1956-57 


H73 


1957-58 


1512 


19i8-&9 


1709 


1959-80 


2000 


1980-61 


2300 


1961-82 


2150 


1982-83 


2293 


1983-1984 


2034 


1984-1985 


2287 



428 




177** 


470 




til 


364 




143 


439 




328 


540 




281 


468 


179* 4 


233 


554 


198 


235 


616 


** 


•* 



•» 



Bo Spring vacations in schools in these areas. 



* First Summer Conference for General Workers. 



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5 



ANNUAL REPORT 



'fi 



Division of UNIVERSITY EXTENSION 
Year Biding June 30, 1965 




STAFF CABINET MEETS 

with 
Franklin P. Hawkes, 
Director 

(L to R.) 
Walter Reavey* Class 
Kelsey Sweatt,Aud.Vis» 
Donald Geary, CDAE 
Mary Prendergast, H.S.B. 
Carlo Simeoli, Class 
Robert Wentworth,Corresp« 
(Otto Kiessling,abs*) 



Fifty years ago, on May 28, 1915, His Excellency, David I Walsh, 
Governor of Massachusetts, signed into lav the legislation establishing 
the Division of University Extension. James A, Mover, the first Director 
of the Division, who took office September 15, 1915, stated in his twenty- 
fifth Report in 19Ult- 

"The evident intention of the framers of the legislation establishing 
Massachusetts University Extension was to set up a FLEXIBLE Organ!- 
aation that would lend itself to meeting whatever educational NEEDS 
adults might have that were not being served by other public agencies 



in the State 



• • • 



Since this is really the Fiftieth Anniversary of the founding of the 
Division, it seems appropriate to include pictures with this report, and to 
have other observances suitable to an Anniversary, Several years ago, Miss 
Ursula K. Toomey, for forty-two years a devoted Supervisor in the Western 
Massachusetts area, prepared "A Brief History of the Activities of the Committee 
on University Extension of the Connecticut Valley Colleges, 191U-1958." Only 
one hundred copies were printed, and some are still available* In 1965, plans 
were made for a Fiftieth Anniversary Dinner on September lk, 1965 at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology Faculty Club with two hundred represen- 
tatives from all over the Commonwealth, A Brochure entitled, "Fifty Years of 
Educational Service to Adults " was prepared by MLss Ellen Fitzpatrick, former 
Supervisor in the Correspondence Office, and issued to all persons present. 
Space does not permit of the inclusion in this report of the invaluable in- 
formation in these two publications, but they are available on request. 

The first type of State-supported adult education in Massachusetts 
was correspondence instruction, which was set up to meet the needs of men 



237 



women who could not attend classes at stated hours. Peter H. Maimonis, of 
11 Central Street, Salem, was the first student to enroll, on January 15, 
1916, in the correspondence course on Concrete and its Uses f which he com- 
pleted in April, 191 6; he then enrolled in the Plumbing Course, which he 
completed in September, 1916. 

Extension classes in subjects not offered by the public school system 
began to be conducted in April, 1916 in various centers throughout Massachusetts, 
whenever practicable, in school or other local public buildings, and, in some 
cases in shops and factories for the accommodation of employees. Such classes 
were formed during 191 6-1 91 7 in the following subjects: 



Advanced Shop Arithmetic 
Civics for Naturalization 
Civil Service 
Commercial Correspondence 
Commercial Spanish 
Educational Psychology 
English Composition 
Foods and Nutrition 
Gasoline Automobiles 



Heating and Lighting for Janitors 

Home Furnishing and Decoration 

Industrial Accounting 

Industrial Organization 

Italian 

Lowell Institute Preparatory Mathematics 

Practical Applied Mathematics 

Retail Salesmanship 

Spoken French 



No tuition fees were charged, but there were charges, payable in advance, 
for lesson pamphlets, stationery, and textbooks (any excess helped to defray 
traveling expenses of the instructor). The usual length of a correspondence 
course was 20 assignments; of a class, 20 meetings. The standard class period 
was 1 3/4 hours, and classes met once a week. Twenty registrations were re- 
quired for the f ojpiiBSLtioii-. of a class, but study groups could be organized with 
10 or more students. 

In January, 1965, a special Weekly Bulletin was issued, which outlined 
the changes that have come about in the last fifty years, as follows: 

"University Extension classes, both on-campus and off -campus, were offered 
until the state educational institutions became strong enough to take 
over their own programs. The two-year Normal Schools became four-year 
State Colleges; the Massachusetts Agricultural College became the 
University of Massachusetts in 194-7; Regional Community Colleges were 
set up in the last few years; a new High School Equivalency Program 
was developed, governed by a Policies Committee, and requiring the 
completion of 16 high school units to receive the certificate; Adult 
Civic Education became a part of the Division of Civic Education in 
1954; Educational Television, sponsored and promoted in part by our 
Office of Audio- Visual Services, was taken over by the Massachusetts 
Executive Committee on School Television; Area Centers to serve 
largely the high school equivalency candidates have been set up in 
10 different regions of the state; Civil Defense Adult Education, 
under a Federal appropriation, has been organized to give courses in 
Personal and Family Survival; Driver Education in high schools is 
now supervised by the Division; and Licensing of Correspondence Schools 
has now become a function of the Division and the Department of Education. • 

"Along with this, FREE INSTRUCTION is provided to World War I and II 
and Korean Conflict Veterans, to Senior Citizens (over 65), and to inmates of 
State and County Institutions. The Legislature makes an annual appropriation 
of between $275,000 and $300,000 to cover the cost of permanent salaries, and 



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allows the Division to use from Receipts an amount up to *4u0,000 to cover all 
other expenses. Fees range from 50tf" per classroom hour for high school and 
A adult courses to $13 per Semester Hour for College Grade Courses. 

In the interest of brevity, it might be well to list as items the acti- 
vities of the Division over the last fifty years, as they were more fully 
described in the Fiftieth Anniversary Brochure: 

Many State Boards of Examiners and Licensing Boards co-operated in developing 
courses and setting standards for achievement. 

Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology placed a number 
of classrooms at the disposal of the University Extension classes. 

Adult Civic Education instructional costs were re-imbursed for 50%» 

Professional Improvement classes for teachers, with enrollments as high as 
6,808 were organized in 58 cities and towns. 

Instruction of adults by radio began in 1923, attaining as many as 2,276 
enrollments, coming from every state, and from every province in Canada. 

New requirements for College Grade Certificates were set up in 1927, and by 
November of that year 1,339 certificates were issued. 

A policy of selling correspondence materials to societies, institutions, 
industries, and other organizations at cost, and reading and grading 
group papers at a nominal sum was begun during World War I. 

Experts in educational and vocational guidance were engaged to conduct free 
guidance clinics for unemployed persons. Prospect Union Educational Exchange 
of Cambridge co-operated in such clinics, and continues to serve the public 
admirably today. 

Preparation for various civil service examinations developed a large clientele, 
and continues to be a strong part of University Extension enrollments. 

The Division co-operated with the Federal government in a Federal Adult Educa- 
tion Program, a Federal Nursery School Program, and a National Citizenship 
Education Program. 

"Institutes" providing intensive instruction of short duration were established 
in various areas, and continue to be most helpful to adults in various types 
of vocations. 

The Division was one of the 75 extension divisions chosen in 1942 to co-operate 
with the United States Armed Forces Institute in providing correspondence 
instruction to servicemen. 

The radio educational program for young people, begun in March, 1944, developed 
into a "Listen and Learn Series," and was incorporated into school programs. 
It may well have been the forerunner of the "21 -inch Classroom" in Television. 

A testing service was established at the State Educational Building in Boston 
to enable high school equivalency candidates to take the General Educational 
Development Tests; another center was set up with the Springfield School 
Department to aid Western Massachusetts. 



123! > 



An invaluable study made by the Massachusetts Association of Teachers of 
Adults in co-operation with the Department of Education was published by 
the National Education Association, 

An "Industrial Education Program" was set up with Fitchburg State College as 
a late afternoon and evening community college, with 75 enrolled, and with 
the first class graduating numbering 12 with an Associate in Science degree. 

Summer Schools for high school students were set up in Fall River, Kingston, 
Westboro, and West Springfield, with over 2,000 students enrolled. 

The state's first industrial sponsor of a high school equivalency program was 
set up at Metals and Controls, Inc., a corporate division of Texas Instruments, 
Inc., in Attleboro. 

In cooperation with the Department of Health, Day Care Courses were set up 
in various communities to help Nursery and Day Care teachers obtain the 
necessary training in education required for a license. 

The age for high school equivalency candidates was dropped from 20 to 18, but 
with a different set of requirements for the 18-19 year old group. 

The Massachusetts Film Cooperative was set up with officers, and shows 92 
School Systems, 10 State Colleges, 36 Libraries, and 205 communities served 
by the State Film Depository. 

One cannot read the history of the development of University Extension without 
realizing that this flexible organization has been free to meet the needs of 
adults in all walks of life, - to experiment with courses, and to establish 
standards. Time after time, programs have been developed by the Division, 
have proved successful as well as popular, and have then been taken over by 
other institutions. It is quite fitting, therefore, that the Division of 
. University Extension, often called the largest "University without a Campus," 
should receive commendation for being a leavening influence, a catalyst, as 
it were, in the educational programs of the Commonwealth. 

In planning this Fiftieth Anniversary Report, we have asked each Supervisor- 
Coordinator to make an individual report, headed by a picture, to indicate 
developments during the year, and in some instances, some historical facts of 
interest. In addition, we have prepared eleven Tables to indicate the scope 
of the program over the years, together with enrollment and financial figures 
which tell their own story; these will be found at the end of the reports. 

It seems advisable, however, to give a statistical summary of the extent of 
the activities of the Division, as a "pre- view" of these reports :- 

ADMINISTRATION .18 Staff 30,536 Course Registrations - 85,000 Bulletins 

semi-annually - 2,000 Weekly Bulletins mailed. 

CLASS LESSONS 16 Staff 607 Courses offered in 71 Towns; 2^,195 enroll- 

ments with 4.00 Part-time Instructors. 

CORRESPONDENCE 12 Staff 6,341 Registrations in 126 courses, with 50 

Part-time Instructors - 2^,211 Lessons 
corrected - 12 Correspondence Schools and 
134- agents licensed and supervised. 



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HIGH SCHOOL 
EQUIVALENCY 

AUDIO-VISUAL 
SERVICES 



CIVIL DEFENSE 
ADULT EDUCATION 



9 Staff 2,584 Applications received - $90 Certificates 
awarded - a backlog of 29,917 cases 

7 Staff 205 communities, served from a Film Library of 

2,600, with 30,000 Bookings a year, and issuance 
of 80-100 Films per day. 

6 Staff 95 towns served through "Personal- and Family 
Survival Courses", with 2,998 certificates 
awarded, and 92 additional teachers trained - 
RAM0NT program initiated with local CD Officials. 



In the previous two Annual Reports, we have discussed the Financing of the 
activities of the Division, but more particularly the FUTURE OF UNIVERSITY 
EXTENSION. During the year 1964-1965, frequent conferences and meetings have 
been held by the Staff -Cabinet of Co-ordinators with the Massachusetts Education 
Study Commission. The passage of Chapter 572, Acts of 1965, which was approved 
June 28, 1965, transfers a number of the functions of University Extension to 
the Board of Higher Education, or to the University of Massachusetts. The 
emphasis in sections of the Act rests largely on those functions that are 
"collegiate in nature.* 

On the other hand, the Board of Education is directed to "provide audio-visual 
services - day care service - and adult education facilities* for the citizens 
of the Commonwealth. A review of the activities of the Division of University 
Extension would indicate that while the name will be changed, there should be 
in the Department of Education a 

BUREAU OF ADULT EDUCATION SERVICES 

or 
BUREAU OF EXTENDED ADULT SERVICES 

with an appropriate staff in the Division of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Naturally, there will be a transition period of a year or more, while the 
three new Boards in Education are appointed, get organized, and determine 
the direction which Education on the State level will take. It will be well 
to develop a Bureau of Adult Education, as 27 other states have done, for 
Service to Adults, as well as Co-ordination of Programs and Activities, will 
be the demands of the next ten years. 

Meanwhile, this Report marks my tenth review of the programs and services 
of the Division of University Extension, but it also marks the time of the 
retirement of your Director on October 1, 1965, after forty-eight years in 
the service of Public Education. It has been a privilege for me to work in 
this field with such fine and able Commissioners of Education, and Division 
Directors, and especially with our excellent, effective Staff of over 65 
personnel who have served the public well, and have been faithful co-workers 
in the cause of Education for Adults. The future will hold changes of many 
kinds, but the challenge will always remain for all of us in the motto :- 



"LEARNING NEVER ENDS! 1 



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CLASS LESSONS PROGRAM 
Walter F. Reavey, Co-ordinator 




Governor John A..Volpe 

congratulates 
Hon* Eleanor Campobasso 

while 
Dr. Oven B, Kiernan, 
Commissioner 

awards 
Certificate in 

LEGISLATIVE PROCEDURES 
Course 

House of Representatives 

February 24, 1965 



The report of the Director and the FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY Brochure have 
given adequate coverage to the history of the Division of University Extension. 
Accordingly, it is planned to cover only the developments during 1964-1965, in 
light of the following quotation from Lewis B. Mayhew, in "Innovation in 
Higher Education": 

"A higher education which might reasonably extend from age 17 or 18 can- 
not rely on traditional concepts of a four year span, a residential situation, 
or a rigid system of prerequi sites • Nor can it apply to the educational needs 
of men and women in their fifties, the instructional techniques devised for 
late adolescent students ..." 

Probably the greatest asset during the year was the institution of 
professional staff meetings. It was from this nucleus that emerged many 
beneficial innovations which greatly strengthened the Class Lessons Program. 

A complete revision of the class program took place. All courses and 
their respective materials were screened, evaluated, and revised to remain up- 
to date with the latest educational developments. A new coding system was 
established, and many new and different courses were offered to keep up with 
the growing educational needs of the people. 

Numismatics is now beginning its third consecutive semester with as 
much popularity as ever* A course in Animal Husbandry was given in Middleboro 
to help some aspiring young equestrians c A need was found to offer a course 
entitled "Environment for Living" which had as its aim the beautif ication 
of Boston. 



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DRIVER 

EDUCATION 



Mr. Reavey watches 

while 
Instructor Frank 

Murphy counsels 

a student* 



Many internal changes have taken place such as the re-arrangement of 
the office furniture; this has provided greater facility and efficiency* 
The filing room has been made more compact to allow more access to files* 
Class Records have been bound. A new Salary Scale was established and 
Implemented, as authorized by the Board of Education. 

The Class Lessons staff formed a nucleus for the Committee to evaluate 
the safety program in the public schools of the Commonwealth* The personnel 
have worked with National as well as local groups in the development of 
programs in education as a life-long process* The United States Office 
of Education as well as the National Education Association has sought our 
counsel on many occasions in the evaluation of curriculum materials* 



WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS CFFICE 

Carlo A. Simeoli, Supervisor in Education 

"The Birth of an Idea** 

At the suggestion of the University Council of Massachusetts, a 
Committee on University Extension was formed in 1914 with the appointment of 
representatives by the Presidents of five colleges in the Connecticut Valley* 
Smith College. Amherst College. Mount Holyoke College, the International 
Y.M.C.A. College (now Springfield College), and Massachusetts Agricultural 
College (now the University of Massachusetts)* In its first two years of 
meetings, the committee formulated extensive plans for the organisation of 
classes in communities of the area* envisioned a continuous series of courses 
throughout the year presented through class instruction and correspondence 
courses, and the award of college credits* 



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£43 



STATE SUPPORT FOR UNIVERSITY EXTENSION * 



The Founding of the Division Comes 




Mr. Simeoli and Mrs. 
Mary R. A. Lovett 
confer to plan the 
West Springfield 
Summer School Program. 
All-time high - 900 
enrolled in 1963. 



It was soon found that the demands for University Extension instruction 
far exceeded the resources of a volunteer committee to answer. Committee 
members and college administration officers decided that the colleges could 
not meet the expense of promotion and administration, that public funds should 
be made available. The Committee was instrumental in having the Massachusetts 
Legislature pass a law establishing the Division of University Extension of the 
Massachusetts Department of Education, and in this way provide state-wide 
support for a program of University Extension. 

In March, 1916, the director of the new division, James A. Moyer, attended 
a meeting of the Connecticut Valley Committee and was made a member. He reported 
that, although the division was in existence less than a year, it had available 
seventy correspondence courses in which 700 students were already enrolled. 
Students paid only for books and materials. He informed the committee that 
the state division planned to offer class instruction or to supervise group 
study but that there were practical difficulties in collecting fees and paying 
instructors. Over a period of fifteen years, Mr. Moyer regularly attended 
meetings of the committee and co-operated in many of its developments. 

As the Massachusetts Division of University Extension grew, field workers 
were engaged to do promotional work in various parts of the state. At first, 
part-time workers were sent to western Massachusetts. However, the Committee 
felt that a full time administrator was needed in the western part of the state 
one who could work closely with the committee in organizing classes. As 
recorded in the minutes of an early meeting, Mr. Moyer asked, "Could a woman 
do the work you have in mind in promoting and supervising the program in 
western Massachusetts?" The Committee agreed that a woman "might" be able to 
fill the demands. 

In 1920-21, an office was established in Springfield. Miss Ursula K. 
Toomey was appointed to direct class organization in the western part of the 
state and to co-operate with the Connecticut Valley Committee, as Executive 
Secretary. 



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CORRESPONDENCE COURSE PROGRAM 



£44 



Robert B. Wentworth 
Supervisor 




Mr* Wentworth watches 
as Christina Hatch 
and Lester Gellar, 
Instructors , review 
Courses for REVISION, 
and EDITING. 



I 



The Office of Correspondence Instruction reports its activities for 1964*- 
1965 as follows :- 

1. Introduced new catalog for Nay, 1965* - attractive cover, better 
organization of courses, more informative content, renamed courses, 
and inclusion of book price list in catalog* 

2. Introduced 18 new courses or major revisions of existing courses* 
This number includes several courses substantially completed or 
revised during the previous fiscal year, but made available to the 
public in July, 196$* 

The new courses are Applied Imagination (non-credit); Basic Programming 
(non-credit); English for Everyone (1 HSU); Fundamentals of Music (4. 
semester hours); History of Art ( 1 HSU); Real Estate Brokers 1 
Preparation (non-credit); Tou and the Law (non-credit). 

The major revisions are Automotive Electrical Equipment (i HSU); Band 
Arranging {A semester hours); Building Custodian Preparation (non- 
credit); Business Mathematics (1 HSU); English IX (1 HSU); English X 
(1 HSU); Principles of Accounting (U semester hours); Technical and 
Shop Mathematics (1 BSU); Typewriting (i HSU). 

Emphasis in study guides has been on more teaching help, more use of 
the imagination, and more thought on discussion questions where 
appropriate* 



5245 



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3. In several instances we were able to relate new study guides or study 
guide revisions to the current scene. Thus a 20 - lesson optional 
suppleriei.t o .nerican Negro literature was included in English XI - 
College Rreparatory; material and problems on civil rights were included 
in the new courses Real Estate Brokers ' Preparation and You and the Lav . 

4. Held extended staff meetings of the professional staff on approximately 
a once-a-month basis throughout the year. Administrative details were 
discussed, but emphasis has been on broad issues and matters rather than 
operational details. 

5. Supervisor wrote a 32 - page Correspondence Instruction Staff Manual 
(with attached supplementary documents) primarily for the use of the 
professional staff. 

6. In progress - a manual for students on "how to study*. - Miss Hatch 

7. Polled all accredited colleges in Massachusetts in regard to their 
acceptance of University Extension high school and college credits - 
clas3 and correspondence courses. 

8. Supervisor participated as staff member in 11th Annual Creative Problem - 
Solving Institute at the State University of Hew York at Buffalo for one 
week. He was co-leader of a week - long seminar for educators interested 
in developing their own programs and served as a consultant in education 
and religious activities. 

9. Staff visit to Industrial School for Boys at Shirley. Staff visit to 
Massachusetts Correctional Institution at Framingham (womens* prison.) 
Supervisor plans to visit all institutions where we have substantial en- 
rollments during 1 965-66 • 

10. Prepared informal miniature catalog of high school courses only. Manu- 
script completed except for approval of High School Equivalency office. 

11. Recommended revised compensation schedules - payment of instructors for 
preparation of study guides, teaching of courses, and correction of papers. 

12. Supervisor carried out policy throughout the year of writing individual 
personal letters to each student who failed a final examination. Reasons 
for failure pointed out. Suggested corrective action in each case. 

13 • Early in fiscal year, established procedure for preparation of study 

guides - preliminary conference with author, confirming letter to author, 
ask for outline and sample lesson. Arrangements confirmed by appointment 
letter from Dr. Hawkes. This procedure has resulted in a substantial 
increase in the quality of study guides. 

14.. Use of outside editorial service for final revision and typing of study 
guides. 

15» Informal organization of the instructors who teach English. The senior 
instructor (Dr. Willis Wager) is expected to f amil iarize himself with all 
our study guides in the field and suggest co-ordination. One meeting of 
the instructors of English courses was held at 200 Newbury Street. 



24B 

16. Supervisor in charge of the licensing of private correspondence schools 
began his duties May 1, 1965 and immediately made substantial progress in 
organizing procedures. He conducted a conference for representatives of 
the private schools which resulted in the establishment of detailed 
educational criteria for evaluating the practices of the private schools. 

17. Supervisor in charge of licensing also established criteria for the 
evaluation of agents of correspondence schools and began the actual 
evaluation of the agents* 



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£47 



HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENCY PROGRAM 

Maxy K. Prendergast, 
Co-ordinator 




MLss Prendergast 

watches while 

Harold F. IfcNally, 
Supervisor 

counsels with 

Mrs* Esther Deas 

on 

Procedures for 

the Certificate© 

The Massachusetts High School Equivalency Certificate Program was estab- 
lished by the State Board of Education in November, 194-5. under the direction of 
a five-member, permanent, policy-making committee which approves the award of 
each certificate by the Department of Education and sets academic guide lines 
to meet the changing conditions in the field of education. This committee 
consisted of representatives nominated by the Executive Committee of the Massa- 
chusetts Superintendents Association and the Massachusetts High School Princi- 
pals Association, in addition to one member selected to represent the college 
admissions ■ offices of the Commonwealth, the Commissioner of Education, and the 
Director of the Division of University Extension. 

Originally intended to assist Massachusetts residents twenty years of age 
or older in reaching their educational goal, this program was transferred to a 
Veterans 1 Services budget on July 1, 194-7. From July 1, 1947, to April 15, 1949, 
the program was closed to civilians; however, on April 15, 1949, the civilian 
program was officially reopened. Since that date the program has been open to 
all qualified applicants— residents of Massachusetts or those who last attended 
day school in Massachusetts. In July, 1961, the program was opened to 18- and 
19-year old candidates under certain conditions. 

From November, 1945, until March, 1946, the GED Tests were administered by 
the Boston University Testing Service. Since March, 1946, the High School 
Equivalency Certificate program has operated the GED Testing service on a year- 
round basis, two days a week, at the State Office Building. With the intro- 
duction of area programs, tests are given periodically at the area centers* The 
High School Equivalency Certificate area centers at Fall River, Fitchburg, Holyoke, 
Milford and Orange and the industrial program at Metals & Controls Inc., Attleboro, 
bring the services of the Department of Education to the home town area of the 
candidates enabling them to qualify for the certificate without having to travel 
long distances. Without this opportunity many would never have become high school 



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graduates. The certificates are presented at area graduation exercises. More 
area centers are needed, but the number of area centers is limited by the size 
of the High School Equivalency Certificate staff which is the only facet of the 
program which remains almost constant* Since 1951 there has been no increase 
in the number of staff, rather a decrease of one clerical position. Only one 
of the High School Equivalency Certificate professional staff members was with 
the program prior to 1962. 

A review of the twenty years in which the program has been in operation 
proves that those who thought it was strictly a program for veterans and doomed 
to fade if not into oblivion into insignificance were incorrect. Twenty years 
later finds the program at an all time high with 590 successful candidates 
receiving the certificate— an impressive increase from the first year's class 
of 4.8 graduates. During this same period over 35,000 persons have applied for 
the state certificate and almost 6,500 certificates have been awarded. More 
than 50$ of these certificates have been awarded since 195S. Even charging 
veterans the same administrative fees as civilians has not decreased the 
number of applications. This High School Equivalency Certificate program 
has become an essential part of the Massachusetts educational scene. 

The year 1964-1965 showed no lessening in the desire of the residents of 
Massachusetts and eligible non-residents of Massachusetts to improve their 
educational status. There was a general increase in the number of applicants, 
cases assigned, tests administered and certificates awarded. Even though the 
program operated for six months without the services of one High School Equiva- 
lency supervisor, a new area center was opened in Holyoke in response to the 
long standing request from the school committee. 

The area graduations which have become traditional were held in Fall 
River, Fitchburg, MUf ord, and Orange— Fall River was the largest with 91 
graduates. For the first time, 15 high school equivalency graduates from the 
New Bedford area who had completed their course requirements at New Bedford 
Evening High School received their certificates at the New Bedford Evening 
High School graduation exercises. The High School Equivalency Certificate 
program at Metals & Controls Inc., had its second graduation which was held 
in the plant cafeteria. It is most gratifying to see the high regard industry 
has for this program. The division foreman actually hands the certificate to 
each man from his division. 

It is unfortunate that the snail size of the high school equivalency certi- 
ficate staff makes it impossible to develop additional industrial programs. The 
interest is there, but the demand cannot be met. A request for an area center 
in northeastern Massachusetts where one is so badly needed also had to be denied. 
Area centers are not only desirable because of accessibility to candidates but 
also because of the greater efficiency with which orientation meetings, testing 
periods, course programming, and counseling sessions can be arranged. 

Mindful of its charge to review policies and practices in terms of new 
procedures and educational upgrading, the policies committee made two major 
changes in policy to be effective in 1965-66. (l) All servicemen are to be 
allowed one unit in physical education for basic or boot training. Previously 
two units in health and physical education were given to World War II and Korean 
veterans; 1947-50 peace time servicemen were allowed two units in physical 
education. (2) All candidates for the High School Equivalency Certificate must 



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complete at least one course after being assigned to a high school equivalency 
supervisor. Previously the certificate could be awarded if the candidate had 
satisfied all the requirements for the award of the certificate before he was 
assigned to a supervisor. 

Two decades of planning, reviewing and expanding with emphasis on quality 
and flexibility to meet the needs of those who are served pave the way for the 
third decade just unfolding. 

The present membership of the Policies Committee, appointed by the Board 
of Education, and effective, 196li-l°65, is as follows: - 

Dr. Franklin P. Hawkes, Chairman, 

Director of University Extension 

Dr. Everett G. Thistle, Vice-Chairman, 

Director of Elementary and Secondary EducatL on 

Mr. David I. Davoren, Superintendent of Schools, Milford 

Miss Ellen Fitzpatrick, Supervisor Eraeritus, 
Office of Correspondence Instruction 

Mr. Ralph L* Frellick, Headmaster Emeritus, 
Brockton High School 

Dr. Donald L. Oliver, Director of Admissions, 
Boston University 

MLss Mary K. Prendergast, Co-ordinator, 

High School Equivalency Certificate Program 



£50 



AUDIO-VISUAL SERVICES 

Kelsey B. Sweatt 
Co-ordinator 




Mr. Sweatt and Staff 
at the Sixth Animal 
Audio-Visual Insti- 
tute on Instructional 



Materials - October 



1964. 



HISTORY CF THE OFFICE OF AUDIO-VISUAL SERVICES 



As early as 1923, the Division was concerned with the value of the use of 
audio-visual aids as a means of enriching the teaching process* It established 
and maintained a library of Eastman silent films, and the Yale University 
Chronicles of America which it loaned for a small fee to the sehools of the 
Commonwealth. About 194-5, the library was temporarily closed; but was re- 
activated in 1948 with two hundred 16 mm films. This eventually grew to the 
present library of more that 2,500 titles with approximately 30,000 bookings 
a year. 

In 1954, the Massachusetts Film Library Cooperative was organized, Unique 
in its function at the time of organization, it allowed local school, library, 
and hospital communities to deposit with the office a film or films which were 
used as the basis of a credit of three times the value of the deposited films. 
This could then be drawn against in rentals by the local communities. The 
suecess of this plan was Immediate, and the present membership includes 93 
school systems, 10 state colleges and the majority of the public libraries in 
the Commonwealth through the Regional Library Centers. 

With the growth of the Film library has also come an expansion of the 
functions of the office. One of its major activities is to promote workshops 
and conferences on instructional materials and newer media, and to advise and 
assist local communities in the development and growth of their own programs. 

In 1959 the Office inaugurated an annual state-wide conference on instruc- 
tional materials with national figures in the field participating. The first 
such conference was held at Gardner with subsequent meetings at We stover Field, 
The Science Museum at Boston, Concord, Weymouth, and Boston University. The 
1965 conference will be held at the Sheraton-Bo ston and in the Prudential 
Center. 



r 



! 



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No history of the office or of the Division would be complete without 
pointing out the pioneering work done over the years in the field of radio and 
television. While it is generally known that the Division was the first 
institution in the country to offer educational courses by radio, beginning 
in October, 1923, it is not as well known that the Office of Audio-Visual 
Services also pioneered in the presentation of one of the first teacher- 
training courses by radio in the nation beginning on October 13, 1945, and 
known as the Massachusetts Plan* 

The plan presented an opportunity for teachers in Massachusetts to listen 
to the National Broadcasting Company^ program "Our Foreign Policy* each 
Saturday evening between 7 and 7:30 over the New England Westinghouse stations. 
The program was supplemented each week by another quarter hour program between 
9s 15 and 9 J 30 on Saturday morning on WBZ and WBZA so that outstanding authorities 
on foreign policy could comment upon the NBC discussions and clarify any problems 
which might arise out of our foreign policy and otherwise assist teachers in 
their appreciation of the problems of government. 

Teachers were required to register with University Extension. They received 
each week a copy of the script used on the program together with a bibliography 
of pertinent articles in magazines and books generally available in even the 
smaller libraries. Teachers were also required to listen to 10 out of the 26 
broadcasts. They vere to submit U written reports on the reference reading and 
2 summaries covering the broadcasts of "Our Foreign Policy*. The papers vere 
one-half of the final grade. Immediately following completion of each one- 
half year broadcasts the teachers took an examination and upon the successful 
completion were certified with two hours of credit. 

The supervised examinations were given in various libraries of the state 
or by local school superintendents personally. 

The "Our Foreign Policy* broadcasts marked the first time all government 
agencies specifically engaged in the formulation and admi nistration of United 
States foreign policy joined together in a public radio discussion. 

Heard were the leaders of the Department of the State, Senate and House 
Committees of Foreign Relations and delegates to the U. N. Conference at San 
Francisco. The Massachusetts Plan was widely publicized in newspapers 
throughout the country. 

The office also instigated the organization of the New England Committee 
on Radio in Education which brought together representatives of public and 
private educational institutions in the six states to study and to promote 
the use of radio as a means of elementary, secondary and adult education. In 
conjunction with the various radio stations in the area, the committee pre- 
sented annual summer workshops which were largely attended by teachers from 
all over New England. 

With the advent of television the office again took the lead in cooperation 
with local commercial stations in the presentation of educational programs. In 
addition, it assisted in the organization and early experimentation of *The 21 
Inch Classroom*. Over the years it has presented a great many outstanding radio 
and television personalities such as Arthur Fiedler, Lyman Bryson, Robert Saudex, 
Sterling Fisher and many others. It has cooperated in the presentation of such 
distinguished television programs as Dimensions on WBZ-TV. and Dateline Boston 
on WHDH-TV. """^ 



( 









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PFor many years, the Office maintained a large radio transcription library, 
and with the advent of the tape recording, the coordinator was asked to serve 
as the first national chairman by the Department of Audio- Visual Instruction 
of the National Education Association to direct the establishment of a national 
tape service, and appropriate catalogue. This service is housed .and functioning 
in Boulder, Colorado. 

At all times, the Office has attempted to bring new educational trends 
into its orbit of interest. In some cases, after a program has been organized 
and gotten under way by the Office it has been absorbed by others. Nonethe- 
less it was the Office and the Division which gave the necessary impetus to 
the establishment, and general acceptance by Massachusetts educators of their 
value and worth to the teaching process. 



\ 






> 



CIVIL DEFENSE ADULT EDUCATION 

Donald J* Clear? 
Co-ordinator 



f*i/«JKS 







Mr. Geary visits a 
CDAE Class conducted 
by Robert Schmoyer, 
Instructor. 

In this class Is a 
blind, a crippled, 
and a deaf person 
learning the art of 
survival in atomic 
danger. 



Since March 1963, the Division of University Extension, under a contract 
with the United States Office of Education, has been training instructors to 
conduct courses in "Personal and Family Survival". Particular effort has 
been made to present this course to persons who would be in charge of groups 
needing guidance and help at the time of any disaster. Among such groups 
are: nurses, school teachers, policemen, firemen, school custodians, 
auxiliary police, State and Federal agencies, and reserve units of the 
Army, Navy, Coast Guard, Marines and Air Force. 

The majority of citizens know little of what Civil Defense has done and 
can do in time of disaster. The Civil Defense units in every state and 
community have had experience helping to save lives during many types of 
disaster, such as earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods and fires. 
There is, in this Atomic age, the ever present possibility of a nuclear 
attack, and knowledge of what to do in that event would save millions of 
lives. There appears to be apathy among the general public regarding any 
defense measures which might be needed in case of a nuclear attack. Such a 
fatalistic attitude can be quickly dispelled when a person views even one of 
the several films shown during the course. Unfortunately, most people believe 
that in the event of an enemy attack and nuclear explosion, everyone would be 
killed or there would be nothing left worth saving. This is absolutely wrong I 
The purpose of the course is to teach the true facts concerning survival. 

Since these courses were first offered, contacts have been made in more 
than 80 communities in the state and 262 teachers have been trained to instruct 
the twelve-hour course. Approximately 145 classes have been offered or are 
being planned and more than 5000 persons will soon have received certificates 
signed by the Commissioner of Education. All the school personnel of the City 
of Holyoke have taken the course, the first city in the Nation to have such 
100% participation. 



254 



Since January 1965, the CDEA Office has taken over the operational super- 
vision of the Radiological Monitoring program, known as RAMONT. Presently, 
there are 208 RAM)NT instructors trained and approximately 900 students will 
have received their Certificates of Completion by the end -of September. In 
the United States Office of Education Reports for the month of June, Massachu- 
setts led the Nation in the number completing the RAMONT course. 

Military Reserve Units have proven to be fruitful fields for instruction. 
Army, Coast Guard, Air Force, Navy and Marine Reserve Units have been given 
the 12-hour CDAE course and have found it to be most informative as well as 
an interesting part of their training. Some towns and cities in which Reserve 
Units have been trained in "Personal and Family Survival* are: Boston, Lynn, 
New Bedford, Worcester, Springfield, Pittsfield, Quincy, Lawrence, Lowell, 
Natick and Falmouth. The training of personnel in Federal agencies has also 
proven successful. Some of the Federal agencies which have been trained, on 
government time, are the Veterans 1 Administration, Departments of: Justice, 
Health, Education and Welfare, Labor, and the Bureau of Public Roads. We 
are especially pleased with our progress with the Veterans 1 Administration. 
Six classes have been given to the personnel and three more classes are now 
in progress, making a total of nine classes taught in one Federal Agency with 
an enrollment of 318 persons. Nurses in many hospitals throughout the state 
have taken these courses. We have recently arranged with the Metrop61itan 
District Commission to have a series of 20 classes for their personnel, 
starting in September and running through to February 1966, each class with 
an enrollment of 25 persons, a total of 500. 

Since Education should start with youth, the ideal is to incorporate the 
■Personal and Family Survival* course into the public and parochial high school 
curriculum for Senior students. These future citizens would be able to transmit 
their knowledge of Civil Defense Adult Education to others in various ways. As 
yet, Civil Defense Adult Education courses have not been generally introduced 
into the school systems. However, future arrangements are being planned and it 
is hoped they will materialize* 






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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ANNUAL REPORT 

MASSACHUSETTS COMPARATIVE STATISTICS 

TABLE I 

ANALYSIS OF ENROLLMENTS - 1915 to 1965 (By 



Dl VI SION 
UNIVERSITY EXTENSION 



O-Year periods) 



Year 




Class 
Enroll ments 

2,332 




Correspondence 
Enrol 1 ments 


E 


Rad i o 
nrol 1 ments 




Total s 


1915-16 


1 ,065 


3,397 


1925-26 




29, 067 




4,531 




1 ,045 






34,643 


1 935-36 




25,800 




4,049 




308 




. 


30, 157 


1945-46 




23,513 




5,807 




- 






29,320 


1955-56 




25,797 




5, 684 




- 






31,481 


Al 1 -t i me 




37,449 




7, 208 




2,276 






44,658 


High 




(1959-60) 




(1959-60) 




( 1926-27) 




(1959-60 


1964-1965 




24, 195 




6,341 




- 






30,536 










TABLE 1 1 
















RECEIPTS AND 


EXPENDITURES - I960 to 1965 








F i seal 
Year 


f 


Cash Rece i p ts 
rom all sources 




Est i mated Val ue 
Free Serv i ces 


To 
(Est 


tals 
mated ) 




Expend i tu res 


1960-61 




$324,248.38 




$267,735.00 


$591 


,983.38 






$604,359.28 


1961-62 




319,925.28 




259, 695.00 


579 


,620.28 






592,856.61 


1962-63 




350,580. 62 




230,475.00 


581 


,055. 62 






617,21 1 .76 


1963-64 




41 1 ,276. 1 1 




204,060.00 


615 


,336. 1 1 






661 ,542.69 


1964-1965 




406,205.23 




180,795.00 


587 


,000.23 






689,378.50 










TABLE 1 1 1 
















CLASS 


INSTRUCTION (By 2-Year 


Pe r i ods 


) 








" Year 


No. 


of Courses 


No. c 


Enroll ments 
>f Towns Paid Free 


Rece i p 


ts 


E 


xpend i tu res 


1958-59 




720 




80 15,366 


18,967 


$237,297 




$179,452 


1960-61 




847 




67 17,324 


13,237 


280, 912 




271 , 173 


1962-63 




720 




64 15,629 


10,921 


308,276 




275,780 


1964- 1965 




607 




71 16, 149 


8,046 


355,980 




238,428 






. 


CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 
















Lessons C 


'orrected 












1958-59 




160 


20 


,753 1,825 


4,519 


27,468 




17,534 


1960-61 




150 


24, 


461 1,816 


4,797 


30,936 




16,800 


1962-63 




140 


25, 


156 2,114 


4,454 


35,433 




20,044 


1964- 1965 




126 


24, 


21 1 2,334 


4,007 


36,71 1 




20,282 






HIGH SCHOOL 


. EQUIVALENCY CERTI F 1 CAT 1 ON 






■ 


Year 




No. of 
App 1 i cat i ons 

2,516 




No. Ac t i ve 

Cand i dates T 

21 ,441 


No. of 
ests G i ven 

6,456 


N 


0. 

cat 


of Cert i f i - 
es Awarded 


1958-59 




423 


1960-61 




2,023 




23,025 


5, 739 








434 


1962-63 




2,356 




26, 460 


4,640 








430 


1964-1965 




2,584 




29,917 


6,253 








590 








AUDIO-VISUAL SERVICES 
















Agencies 


Served 


- Co-operatives 


Supervisors 








Communities School 
Year Served Systems L 


Regional 
.ibrarians Library Towns 


Full- 
time 


Part- 
time 


Fi 
Boot 


lm 
;ing< 


\ Receipts 


1958-59 


106 


39 


' 73 


- 


42 


257 


13, 


479 


$3,096 


1960-61 


160 


61 


81 


m 


45 


260 


13, 


099 


2,193 


1962-63 


220 


59 


78 


68 


50 


275 


18, 


000 


4,932* 


1964-1965 


205 


92 


36 


169 


56 


155 


30, 


000 


6,793* 



•Co-operatives supply films in place of rentals; our Film Depository 
now numbers 255Q valued at $275,000 as a result. 



' 



( 



-C'TIES .o:D TOUT'S SERVED BY UNIVERSITY EXTENSION 



<!6, 



1. Class Lessors 2. Correspondence Courses 3. Audio- Visual Services 
4. High School Equivalency 5. Civil Defense Adult Education 



1. 


2. 


3. 




5. 1. 


2. 


CHART II 
3. 4. 5. l. 


2. 


3. 


4 


. 5. . 


~r i* j ;> 


Abington 








Chester 


X 


•::- 


M 


^S* Hadley 


Acton . . — b» 








, Chesterfield 


-X 






Halifax 






— , w 


^C 


%»* 


rT • 


* . Chirnp#»« 


■5C- 


•>:- 


-*<* 


" Hamilton 




,v | #» , - 


Acustiiist ■ — 










■jii^ '■ 


icT 


« 1 -.;- 


! 


Chilmarlf -5C- 






* V* 


Hampden 




Adams . 










31 




-- 


-\- . 


Clarksburg 












i Ar:?.*A r em 


%c 




"- 




Hancock 






i 


. , . j 


. _ Clinton . . 


•/r 


ft 


^C 


Hanover 




Ailoru . — 


w 




JJ- 






-ft 


t» ! « 


■ 


Cohaaset . . 


•::• 


4\ 


vr 


Hanson 




.iXQCsbury 


%c 








-^TT - " 


"vr 


« j -::- 


""' Axaherst ^p— : 


,_.. Colrain . . 






91 


Hardwi^k 




it 


4\ 


# 






1% 


•::- 1 -ft 


* Andover 


Concord . . 




s* 


* 


HarvsrH 












J'- 


•ft 


•Jr 1 \l~ 


»f A 1 * 


Conway . . 


4\ 






Harwich 




<r Ai.ington . *— 






-::- 








# ! •::■ 


... i 


, ,,. Ciimmington 


* 


•Yc 








AsQDumnftn - 


u 

— tt- 


'\4 


S(- 




,Z, Hatfield 




— -,i 


t " 


Ashby . -${r— J 


., Dalton 


Jf4 
4\ 


■^^ 


-ft 


-ft Hfl verhill 


■#- 




%t 


* " Aehfield . 


n 


*\ 


n 


' Danvers . 








TTawIpv 




•..- 


* « 


Ashland . 


X 


s:- 


il 


'yl Dartmouth 








Hpath 


-ft 


-ft 


■ft 


Athol . —r 


'if 




%» 


Dedham 


J/ 


-;f 


-ft 


Hincham 


•ft 


*»c 


•ft 


*if 


Attieboro — - 


v- 




ic 


,."**■ Deerfield 


•*'. 
>« 












•"- 


.*C 


Auburn . 








Dennis . 


•«■ 


4C- 


*V" 


" % " Holhroolc 




4\ 






Avon . . — — 


-Jfc 


-X- 


i'c 


Dighton . 


^5- 


Jtf 




Hnld^n 




4% 






mmm Ayer . . 


~ff 




^f 


Douglas . 








Holland 




* V" 


pi 


-;;- 


Barnstable 






•x- 


Dover 


-:{■ 


3/ 

if 


-ft 




— yr — 

n 






•;;• 


Barre . . 


•* 




-::• 


* Dracut . .•{. 


\4 


Jk4^ 


-> 


-ft Holvoke 






V* 




Becket . . 


» 




tt 


Dudley . 


i'e 


# 


i»t 




#? 


& 


ft -i 


j» 


-ft Bedford . . 


luT 






Dunstable 


Jii^ 


^C 


•"'• 




il 


?5 


& j 


t 


Belchertown 


^»C 


m 4C 


<t 


Duxbury 


-;ji 




-ft 








"iC 




■"'•'Bellingham 


W 


^i* 


7C 


East Bridgewater 


4% 




-rr 


i xiuDo&ruowon 




7?'" ' 


\\ 




Belmont . — „ 




■Ji 1 




East Brookfield 


■5c 


•55- 


-ft 


•^ Hull 






ft 


■vr 


Berkley . . 




* c 


J /C- 


* East Longmeadow 












W 






Berlin . . . 


■& 


Vi* 




,._ .. Eaatham 


i» 


•55- 


-;:- 










►JJ. 


Pfrnnrditon 


ji»^ 
#" 


^:- 


-:v 


™ Easthamptnn 


— Ipswich 




"T 1 — 
4k 


•::•! -:.- 


""" Eeverlv . *"* - 


-:'r 


•J5- 


4t 


Easton . . S 




J" 


-r«- 


-ft. Kingston 




" r 


*C /T, 


-T7 ^>V»V»»J 

Biilerica . 




■K- 


• 


Edgartown 




4C- 




Lakeville 




*iv 


j./ 




Blackstone 


PC 




•j 


Egremont 


-* 


^- 


-ft 


Lancaster . 








-rf* — 


Blandford . ... 






•j:- 


Erving . 


•5r 






Lanesborough 






it* 


Jl 


''•"Bolton . 




*:c- 


•m 


_3L Essex * 


5L. 


a.. 


-:;- 


__ife Lawrence . 


-ft 


if 


4% 


-*'. 




'ir 


-x- 




EvPr^H * 


-:c- 


£4 


«• 


1>cC • • • 










Rnnrnft . 


•:^ 






Fairhaven 








ft Leicester 








it 


Rovhorough , """ 






tf 


Fall River 


•.:- 


-:{• 


*- 


Lenox . . . 




-ft 


•*c 




-;;-Rovfnrd * 


X 


•in 


•35 


* Falmouth 


■» 


# 


^ 


•ft Leominster 




-ft 


« 


A/ 


*"" Boylaton ._*»- 


-:c- 


^:- 


« 


Fitch bvrg 








Leverett 




ft 


-;;- 


tC 


"- Braintree 








Florida 


-y. 


«it 


%» 


Lexington . 




*4? 






Brewster 


*fc 


j# 


*.f 


■5S- Foxborough 








Leyden . . 




a 


v f 


.>', 


•J; Bridgewater 


-.s- 


*x- 




* Framingb^rn 




■?:- 




Lincoln . . 








•::• 


Brimfield . .... 


■M- 




-i^ 


Franklin 


•jj 


•jf 


-ft 


Littleton 




^■T 


•::- 


-;j. 


•::- nr nekton 


-.{• 


*- 




Frpfttnwn *^ 




•Jr 




•ft Longmeadow 






< '* 


Brookfield 


J\4 


% 


* 


Gardner '*" 




n 


-::- 


* Lowell . . 




%* 


» « 


•35 Brookline 










S£ 


-«- 


-ft 


Ludlow . . 




4 * 


• 1 


Buckland 


^:- 


•e? 


If 






•J5- 


-ft 


Lunenburg 




-ft 


•X- 


•ft 


. "^'Rnrlingt.nn 








ciii - ■ ■ 




•JC- 


-ft 


-ft Lynn . . 


ft 


»# 


* * 


*»^ 


J .'c Cambridge 


•Ji 1 


-::- 




p— — \J1U ... 


%■ 


* 


■j:- 


"ft Lvnnfield 




«2f- 






. -:r- Canton . . 








Onshpn 


J.* 
4? 


tf 


■«• 


•ft Maiden 


i 


If 


»• 
V 


Carlisle . . 








. . CrDflnnld 


£4^ 




•};- 


Manchester 




£4 






Carver . . 


-J5- 


3' 


£4 
4? 


/** Ornfton 


%C 




-ft 


...... Mansfipld 


tt 


«*" 


*- 


-X- 


Charlemont # 




-^r- 


-> 


,-;«■ Granbv 


ty 


#. 


n' r 


,_ , Marhlfhead 




J/4 


, 




Charlton 








Oranvill© 


mt*L 


* 




Marion 






•ft 




Chatham "»* ' 








Orsftt BaTTinorton 


it 


n 


-ft 


... Marlhorourh 




•ft. 


19 
tfj 


»* 

•»«* 


Chelmsford 


\4 
4? 


■JJ- 






« 


■ft 




Marshfield 


•ft 


*ft 




-ft 


*<>' Chelsea . 


•::- 




%4 






-ft 








*'" 




v.- 


CV«hira 


#C 




^r^ 




JJ5 


























•St 1 - w - 

*» 1 /v 


*i 


_ Mavuard 



CITIES AND TOWNS SERVED BY UNIVERSITY EXTENSION 



258 



%)\ 



1 Class Lessons 2. Correspondence Courses 3. Audio-Visual Services 

4. High School Equivalency 5. Civil Defense Adult Education 

CFAItT II (Cont'd.) 



1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 



1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 



•* 



K 



•* 



•v* 



■55 



* 



>•- 



W 



■/c 



ft 



w 



!■ * 






_ Medficld 

_ Medf ord 

_ Medway 

_ Melrose 

_ Mendon 

_ Merrimac 

_ Methuen 

_ Middleborough 

_ Middlefield 

_ Middleton 

_Milford 

_Millbury 

_ Millis . 

_ Millville 

_ Milton 

_ Monroe 

_ Monson 

_ Montague 

_ Monterey . 

_ Montgomery . . 

— Mount Washington 

_ Nahant 

_ Nantucket 



■fc 



jfe 



v 



iL 



-* 



•>c 



-::•■* 



x. 



# 



* 



tt 



# 



5T 



* 



« 



& 



tf 



-;;- 



-"- 



* 



*- 



-* 



-^ 



•» 



■?:- 



w 



2£_Natick . . 

Needham . 

New Ashford 

2£ New Bedford 

New Braintree 

New Marlborough 

New Salem 

'"'_ Newbury . 
*'•* Newburyport 

Newton . . . 

Norfolk . . . 

North Adams 

North Andover 

North Attleborough 

North Brookfield 
North Reading . 

Northampton 

Northborough 

Northbridge 

Northfield 

Norton . 

Norwell 

— Norwood 

Oak Bluffs 

Oakham 

* <c Orange 

Orleans 

Otis . 



£ 



a, 



ia> 



i 



*• 



J$: 



«• 



t' 



■i 



« 



j& 



■Si- 



■>»- 



# 



1> tt 






•5;- 



■>«- 



■SC- 



-S 



■j* 



Petersham 
. Phillipston 

Pittsfield 
. Plainfield 
. Plainville 

Plymouth 
. Plympton 

Princeton 



„_ Provincetown 



* Quincy 



te 



*- 



-* 



■J- # 



i_& 



I- 



*■ 



•*• 






ii 



n w 



fi 4t 



•>»- 



w 



.._"?:l Oxford 

£_ Palmer 

Paxton 

1_ Peabody 

Pelhara . 

Pembroke 

Pepperell 

_Peru 



-> a 



* 



*! 



*( #& 'I 



•?• 



i; 



•j- 



*• 



-: 



■if 

-* 



•j- t 



v 



ft 



« 



# 



« 



c w 



■J'c 



*L Randolph 

Ravnham 

2L- Reading . 

Rehoboth 

Revere . 

Richmond 

Rochester 

*_ Rockland 

Rockport 

Rowe 

Rowley . 

Royalston 

Russell 

Rutland 

-£_ Salem 

JL. Salisbury 

Sandi6field 

-p— Sandwich 

Saugus . 

Savoy . . 

Scituate . 

Seekonk . 

Sharon . 

Sheffield . 

Shelburne 

Sherbora 

Shirley . 

Shrewsbury 

Shutesbury 

Somerset 

-£_ Somerville . 

— South Hadley 
Southampton 
Southborough 
Southbridge 
Southwick. . 
Spencer . . 
Springfield 
Sterling . . 
Stockbridge 



« 



. Stoneham 



2£_ Stoughton 

— Stow . . 

— Sturbridge 

— Sudbury 

— Sunderland 

— Sutton . . 

Swampscott 

Swansea 



1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 



■JJ- 



•J* 



j&. 



*■ 



tt-f 



a* 



*> 



* 



% 



at 



Tf 



* 



tt 



Jk. 



* 



a 11 



■Hr 



4t 



4* 



-;<• 



-15- 



* 



■5? 






* # 



•B * # 



IF 



.»<: 



-;:- 



* 






•» 



sr 



IT 



IF 






^F 



•» 



•fc M- 



* 



* 



IF 



&_* 



«■ * 



"35 "25 



■Jf •* 



_*_ Taunton 

Templeton 

"* , Tewksbury 

Tisbury . 

Tolland . 

JLTopsfield 

Townsend 

Truro . . . 

Tyngsborough 

_ Tyringham 

Upton 

.. __ Oxbridge 

Wakefield 

_ Wales . 



it_Walpole 
Waltham 



El Ware 

Wareham 

Warren . 

Warwick 

Washington 

Watertown 

«L_Wayland 

Webster . 

Wellesley 

Wellfleet 

Wendell . 

Wenham 



» 



* West Boylston . 

jf West Bridgewater 
West Brookfield 
West Newbury 



•fr 



*« 



■iHf 



IF 



•;t 



IF 



Jfc 



■» 



4k 



a-' 



•» 



« 



# 

-? 






V -3t 



•« ■» ^i- 



-»- 



■jV 



•X- 



* 



.>'. 



* Weat Springfield 
West Stockbridge 
West Tisbury 
Westborough 



± Westfleld 
Westford . 
Westhampton 
Westminster 
Weston 



Westport 

Westwood 
WeymOuth 
Whately 
Whitman 



Z Wilbraham 

Williamsburg 

Williamsto wn 

Wilmington 

Winchendon 

.Winchester 
_ Windsor . . 
_ Winthrop . 
_Woburn . . 
_ Worcester . 
_ Worthington 
_ Wrentham 
_ Yarmouth. 



TF 



S 






I 



*<25*J 



CHART III 

fjT.franPLE OF PA1EMENTS AND FEES. 

I. PAYMENTS FOR INSTRUCTION AND SERVICES. 

College Course Instructor » 

High School and Adult Course Instructor i 

Specialized Adult Courses * 

Co-ordinator, or Laboratory Assistant * 

Lecturers, as assigned * 

Paper Correction - College - above 40 

students 
Correction, Correspondence Lessons 
Preparation, Correspondence Courses 
Revision, Correspondence Courses 
Preparation, Correction, of Examinations 
Preparation of Newsletters 
Area, or Local Organizers 
Division Organizer, or Proctoring 
Area Center Supervision 
Supervision of Advanced Registration 
Building Secretary 

Class Secretary 
Projectionist 

Clerical Services - Hourly Rate 
Custodial Services 
Police Services - Boston 

* - Plus Travel 

H # SCHEDUIE OF FEES REQUIRED* 

College Grade Courses 
Specialized Adult Courses 

High School and Adult Courses 
Registration Fee - all courses, Class 

Lessons 
Laboratory and Materials Fees 
Textbooks (Correspondence Courses) 
Special Fees - Writing Courses 
Examinations - End-of -Course, or Make-up 
High School Equivalency Application, 

includes Certificate 
General Educational Development Tests 
Transcripts - First one free 
Certificates - Class or Correspondence 
Film Rentals - per week 

Late Registration 



July 1. 1965 



$160-4180 per Semester Hour 
$7 to $9 per Class Hour 
$8 to $10 per Class Hour 
$100 per Course 
$10 to $50 per Lecture 

25$ per paper 

50 jt to $1*25 per Lesson 

$1 to $15 per Lesson 

$5 to $12 per Lesson 

$3 to $12*50 per Examination 

$20 per Newsletter 

$15 to $40 per course* 

$8 to $10 per night 

$5 to $15 per Night 

$12 per Night 

$6 to $7.50 per Night, plus 

50$ per 100, large classes* 
Refund of Tuition 
$3.50 to $15 per night. 
$1*49 to $2*12 per hour. 
Local Pay Schedule 
$3*00 per hour* 



$13 per Semester Hour to $18. 
$15 per Course, or 50$ per Class 

hour* 
50$ per Classroom hour 

$1 per Course 

$1 to $5 per course 

$2 to $10 per Book 

$1 per Paper 

$1 to $5 per Examination 

$5 per Application 

$5 per set; $1 Individual 

$1 for each Duplicate 

$1 for each Duplicate 

$2*4-0 to $12, according to value 

of film. 
$2* per Course 



0) 



ft 



o 



O 
■P 



81 



3 

<4 



i 

6 



D 



a 



ft 



■8 

| 



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a 



13 



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I CM 

I CM 



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TABLE V 
CLASS COURSE ENROLIi-lSNTS 



I A. CLASSES Number of Cla 

1. Degree Credit 

a. Undergraduate 113 

b. Graduate U 
Total 129 

2. Non-Degree Credit 16*2 

3. Non-Credit 299 
TOTAL CLASSES 

I 3. CLASSES - REGISTRATIONS 

Degree 
Class Credit-UGraduate 


sses 

590 

Graduate 





Num 

Non 
Degree 



ber of Registrations 

3586 

ho6 

3992 

5333 

a690 

Non 
Cr. Credit 
90 
91j0 
"0 

3853 
8I4O ' 

175U 


2183 



2i£" 




Agriculture 



323 

1591 

299 ' 
319 

— T 

831 


6' 
"<T 

3586 

- REGIST 

•ee 

lit-UGrad 


RATIO 
gate 


Behavioral Scs. 
Biological Scs, 


10U6 

as 




Business 





Education 


Uo6 



d 


Engineering 
Health Professions 




1382 


1788 ' 




Humanities 
Law 






Phys. Sciences 
Interdisciplinary 





b * 

U06 

NS 


Other. 


Mi 

1236S 

Non 
Cr. Credit 


TOTAL 

IIA. CORRESPONDENCE 

Courses Degi 

Crec 


5333 

Non 
Degree 



Agriculture 



"207" 

0~ 





Behavioral Scs. 


611 

296 






Biological Scs. 





Business 
Education 


-4- 

69 


1012 ~ 

23T 




31 



Engineering 
Health Professions 
Humanities 
Law 


U7 

1027" 





273" 



Physical Scs. 
Interdisciplinary 


806 


353U 


113 



Other 





321 


TOTAL 


1999 


n.95 



( 






1 



4G2 



V 



g 



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°>3 



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<D 
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H C\J 
OJ H 



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TABLE VI - B 



STATISTICS - CORRESPONDENCE E-iROUKENTS 31 CATEGORY 



<Z{>3 



ACTIVE 




ACTIVE 


1963-6U 


CLASSIFICATION 


196k-6$ 


95 


Art 


88 


373 


Automotive Courses 


355 


306 


Bookkeeping and Accounting 


187 


333 


Civil Service & License Preparation 


321 


U8 


Clerical and Stenographic Courses 


170 


158 


Drawing, Design and Blueprint Reading 


12*7 


77 


Economics 


U9 


Uo 


Education 


89 


13U 


Electrical Courses 


132 


11*88 


English and Literature 


1396 


17 


Forestry 





U93 


History and Government 


562 


hk 


Homemaking 


83 


k3 


Industrial Engineering 


110 


29h 


Languages 


261 


160 


Law 


237 


19 


Library Science 


75 


k2 


Management 


51 


852 


Mathematics 


795 


31 


Mechanical Drawing 


36 


33 • 


Metallurgy and Welding 


31 


279 


Music 


U92 


la 


Navigation 


ia 


109 


Psychology 


207 


1*17 


Radio, Television and Electronics 


390 


16 


Salesmanship and Advertising 


10 


293 


Science 


392 


26 


Sociology 





7U 


Structural Courses 


79 



f 









(XMSDNWEAIffH CF MASSACHUSETTS 



DEPARTMENT OF EIXJCATION 



rarvERsm extension division 



TABIE VII 
Fiscal Year 

19*5-*6 

1946-4? 
1947-48 
1948-49 
1949-50 
1950-51 
1951-52 
1952-53 
1953-5* 
l95*-55 
1955-56 

1956-57 
1957-58 

1958-59 
1959-60 
1960-61 
1961-62 
1962-63 
1963-6* 
196*-65 



State High School Equivalency Certificate Program 19*5-1965 



Applications Filed 

2,950 
2,007 

827 
1.7*9 
1,172 

60* 

595 
i,120 

1.661 
1,7*0 
2,073 
2,356 
2,236 
2,516 
1,797 

2,023 
2,06* 
2,356 
2,526 
2,58* 



Certificates Issued 

48 
219 
305 
215 
26* 

190 
178 
12* 
155 

242 

303 
368 
400 
*22 

431 
459 
505 

*30 
*88 
590 



TABIE VUI 



Summary of Visual Instruction Service, 1953-6*5 



Fiscal Year 



1953-5* 
195^-55 
1955-56 
1956-57 
1957-58 

1958-59 
1959-60 
1960-61 
1961-62 

1962-63 
1963-6* 
196*-65 



No* of Bookings 



2,300 
3,^0 
5,24* 
7,300 
12,500 

13,*79 

14,000 

13,099 

16,000 (approx.) 
18,000 ■ 
20,000 " 
30,000 " 



Bookings of Cooperative Rental 
( Schools . libraries > Hospitals ) Receipts 



24 


$3,296 


66 


2,042 


1*0 


1,969 


11* 


1,6*9 


121 


3,790 


125 


3,096 


124 


1,699 


155 


2,193 


151 


3,207 


143 


*,932 


167 


5.299 


295** 


6,793 



**80 school systems - 36 public libraries - 10 state colleges - In addit ion 68 
towns are served from the Regional library Center at Worcester and 101 towns from 
the Regional Center at Springfield, 



i 






COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



UNIVERSITY" EXTENSION DIVISION 



TABIE IX SUMMART OF CIVIL DEFENSE ADULT EDUCATION SERVICES-PERSONAL AND FAKCII 

SURVIVAL COURSES 



FISCAL 3EAR TOWNS SERVED TEACHERS TRAINED BNRQLIMSNT5 CERTIPICATES ISSUED 



1963-64 
1964-65 



51 
70 



318 
92 



1566 
3072* 



1,611 
2.998* 



TABLE X SUmARX" OF DAT CARE SERVICES AND COURSES 



FISCAL TEAR 

1963-64 
1964-65 



COURSES QFEEKBD 

6 
15 



ENROLLMENTS CERTOICATES ISSUED 



350 
552 



317 

508 



TABIE XI SUMMARY OF CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL SUPERVISION 



EISCAL2EAR 



1963-64 
1964-65 



SCHOOL APPUCATIQNS 

tedStvEb 



5 Original 
7 Renewal 



AGENT APPIICAHQNS 
EEC5IVED 

60 

110 Original 

24 Renewal 



RECEIPTS 



$1,900 

$3,300 



( 



( 






^66 

ANNUAL REPORT 

Division of Vocational iTdaeation 

Tear Ending June 30 # l$& 

AORICULTUWA ZWQATim 
DAI SCHOOLS AND DBPAKTHEKT8 

The &th Anns** Professional Improvement Conference for teachers of 
vocational agriculture via conducted on June 29 to July 1st inclusive* 
The these of the conference highlighted "the Expending Hole of Vocational 
Agriculture*" Featured speakers included H* Seville Hunslcker, Chief of 
Occupational ^rsnch* 9*0* Office of Education* and Dr. riavid R. *sClay # 
Head. Teacher Eenoation* Pennsylvania State 'niversity* Poth speakers 
emphasised the need for updating the instruction to meet the present and 
future needs* Over 100 teachers end guests attended the conference held 
at the torfolk County Agricultural School* ithode Island teachers attended 
as invited guests* 

A successful panel was held on the topic "Providing Occupational 
Exper i e n ce s in Ott~Tmm Agricultural Occupations* 11 Areas receiving 
attention ranged frost conservation to agricultural mechanics. A critic* 
teacher workshop was held for one-day (July 9th) at Norfolk for the 
purpose of * *j * tta* M Tetrtnr the appr entice trainln" experiences end 
developing sons guidelines for the progs*** Eleven individuals 
participated* 

State TeacherVTreiner, assisted by Stats Supervisor, conducted a 
two-day inserviee course on July 15-0.6 at the vfeltham Horticultural 

•■■xoerinsnt "tation* *nhasis MS olaccl lei ; ' IM to leacr- ImiwNel 
Occupations** Tw e ntytc m teachers ettendsd* 



First-year teachers net on July 13 at 'Serf oik for the purpose of 
snaring problems encountered and resolving sar* In a professional 



A coraralttee of twelve was organised to revise* adopt and 
a position pspss for use as a guide in preparing the State Plan for 
Agricultural Fdaeation. the State Supervisor and Stats Teacher-Trainer 
net on September Z2 with this consultant oommittee* As a result* a firm 

P*L* 88*230* 



From industry a two wen advisory ccras&ttse in the area of far* 
machinery designated by the Farm and IndBstrial Kquipment Institute has 
guided our program in agricultural neehanica* A 13th year program will 
be initiated in the Fall as a result of their assistance. 

Six area nestings were conducted as inserviee sessions to upgrade 
employed te achers * Rvesy effort was mads to stimulate action in 
curriculum development end revision necessary to meet the needs of those 
students entering off-faro agricultural occupations* 

Four issues of inserviee letters were prepared and distributed to 
teachers and others* 

fenr Issues of the Bay Stater were prepared and distributed to 
nsnbers of the FFA* 



r 









K>< 



The rtate Office Handbook was revised and used by all Stat© officers* 
A Willi a* outline was prepared tar an inssyvloii course on front end 



The State Supervisor assisted In preparing material and advising those 
In charge of sm s ajs conducted for the purpose of planning ares vocational 



The Teaoneiwrrainer served ss resource person for a special guidance 
ororsjiss IMsmmTl sett tsUafsa Ml eH I 9MUI IhmMA pM MM 

for high school guidance teachers (25 enrolled). 

Loan of audio-srisual equipment and preparation of tranaparenciss 
wars ssrvioea rendered as by the audio-visual section* 

To up-grade lnatrnotion in teehnical agriculture, apprcnrtnately 
$35*000 ef P*U 3d-QQ funds have been allocated schools to purchase 

of 



One nsw facility will be opened st Horfblk In September which i n c l ude s 
two modern science laboratories, library, two classrooms, audio-visual 
center end combination junssuiliseNiiuUloi Tipi> 

At Essex, ground has been broken for a $500,000 science building. 



Four centers are in the proo oo i of adding new greenhouse facilities, 
each with 1000 square feet under glass* 

Considerable help has been provided severs! schools under P#L. 38-210 
funds in up-dating their libraries. 

SfcmWsKJsXMN. 

Plsssassxt follow-up studies reveal that graduates are finding 
employment in off-farm agricultural occupations at an increasing rate. 
fewer and fewer graduates are leeoadng established in armingj fewer 
grsduatss are found in production agriculture, xsellent opportunities 
are available for cooperative work programs for students* Demand 
the supply of available students* 



* -. 



-• w m&m 



Pre^rsms sew established in two schools, Ssssjc and Korf oik, with a 
total enrollment of 50 students* Course offerings are in Ornamental 
Horticulture, Forestry and wildlife anagewent end Agricultural liechaniss* 
Approval has been given for the training ef Operators ef Karth-moving 
equipment* To date Associate Degress have net been granted in the post- 
high school programs. Efforts are being mads to interest Bristol la 

> - condeew -jro psa* 



r 



«B8 



Mi reoognise that mere adult classes should jo of farad by high school 
departments* They am needed especially in orna me ntal horticulture end la 
the operation of sgrlenltural businesses* These oouraaa should be designed 
to throve living eUnoerde through Increeeed 



The County Schools ere offering a variety of adult courses In 
ecrlcttltura* In addition to conducting evening courses ths county schools 
neve successfully completed nine manpower pr e ^ f sw in the pest year* Only 
one hi^h school deportment - Worcester m has undertaken e M an p ower 
The latter propr i a is in Ornanental Horticulture* 

cJMJc^smm 1 yiYatf-°n MjtealflMa^L 

In an effort to revitalise the curricula*, six district meetings 
conducted on coarse revision end adjustment of the curriculoa. 



Major curricula* shsn^es involve the expansion of ths plant . 
area of agriculture. Programs are being strengthened in ornamental 
horticulture, landscape gardening, floriculture! and floral design* 



One ether Juniltsmmnt Is in agricultural neohanica in which 
is being placed on snail engine Maintenance sod repair. Also, tune-op 
kite have been added in many school shops to provide training in adjusting 
tractor e ngines for better performance* 

AH Hi^i School departments have been evaluated by the N* £• Association 
of Colleges and flosandniy Schools* The County Agricultural schools have 
yet to be evaluated but have taken the initial steps. 



tjx'mxv: 



At Norfolk, a course in the post-high school program has been appr ov ed 
for the training of operators of light c art h —a o y tag equipment including 
preventive nalntensMss and repair* 

Charlton, Silver Lake, Harraganaett and tiorcoster are erecting green* 
houses which will allow formal training in ornsmental horticulture and 
related fields. 



The State FFA Program is r&cy active, k 2*day leadership school 
held for the State officers. The State of floors participated in the Sew 
England Leadership Training School* everal days were spent in helping 
with the Regional FFA activities at the Eastern states Exposition. Wine 
State Judging Contests were conducted at the University in ths Fall and 
again in the Spring with excellent participation* Five State FFA teems 
participated in the National contests. leadership schools for Cheater 
m officers were conducted in three centers by the State Staff and 
State officers. A successful State FFA Convention was held A^rll 13-Olu 
A strong Stmts FFA Femndation has been maintained. Members have availed 
themselves of both State and National Fomndation awards through meritorious 
in agriculture and leadership. 






( 



269 



R^mitj»nt. retention sad 

Here changes In teaching personnel has taken place during the pest 
year than usual* fills has been due to five retirement*. Fortunately, 
More than usual qualified individuals have been recruited from industry • 
AH have received counsel and guidance through interviews with the State 
Supervisor, A total of fifteen students were enrolled in the preservioe 
teacher trainins class. B e cause Heeeacbuaotte utilises primarily, 
specialised teachers. It becomes a real concern to fill all vacancies. 
It has been necessary to continue the plan of approving teachers subject 
to the completion of the required teacher training provided sn individual 
is qualified in all other respects. 

two critic teaching centers were added during the pest year. Six 
iiesdntrs ware held for five apprentices. laeh apprentice was visited 
four tines each while t e a ching . 

Teachers engaged for the HDTA Programs have received a special JO 
dock—hour unit course. 

the 5tate**fiae study to deternine the employment opportunities and 
needed o an iiwi t a n s i es in aariealtnral occuaationa other than f arnlruz was 
completed* In tMrteen occupational groups the marvey showed a total 
of 25,30? fu2X*<tis» and 6,1*60 part-ti e workers. A total of 378 firsa 
ware surveyed. Emp loys as indicated that 20,275 workers of their employ 

w»ns'wj^wseB>we aaata> a« vy wwav w w*»» caav Vrwaws^^v i^assaaj#a*awws efwis asaaaa^^as^pajaas a mj+ %s eBaBBiaajajejs*wmnB«ea w aa^^j^eawa vaaaaa* w-^w^e*' 

were found in off-farm agricultural occupations than the number of 
individuals adsquately trained, aeployars desired better-trained workers 
in off -f era agricultural occupations* Many amplayars expressed a desire 
that their present caployeee un 'argo auppaaaentsl training in the perfora- 
snaa of their jabs* 

Results of the findings will be utilised to point out to superintendents 
and aeabers of school coavdttees justification for training in agricultural* 
related oceusatioae* 

^nrollront in the all-day agricultural pro^rara Increased slightly, 
totalling; 1,33? individuals* A total of 103 graduated in June* Concern 
was focused an the 126 withdrawals (9.1£)« However, the majority of 
withdrawal a were found not to be school dropouts sa they transferred to 
gen eral education. 

FoUowMso of graduates (20U) from the 1963 elaea revealed that 35* 
continued their education. Of those available for employment (97) a total 
of 8t» were placed in the occupation for which trained. Only U individuals 
were employed in a field not related to agriculture. Only two individuals 
were reported sa unemployed. 

The supervisor served ae chairman of a committee representing all 
services in developing administrative proced u r es for the establishment 
of programs for the sccio-eaonomically handloapped youth. 



Z'A) 






All schools hove been urged to i&vslop brochures for distribution 
to parents and prospective students. Nearly all schools revised their 
plan of instruction during the past year* 

Three oat-door billboard posters were Greeted throughout the State 
to observe National Wfk week. The thee* was "Agriculture-Our National 
Bsritage*" 

The fhtpsnifinr net with several school coBtaitteee and Beards of 
Trustees to interpret the program as now permitted under revised State 
nans* 

Dual job-holdlag eenog farmers Is prevalent in the State* It is 
a sign of a rapidly changing sericulture, the part~tia» farmer on the 
average is younger them the f ull-tiae f amor* He has completed me 
years of school* He works wore hours per year* Be seeks out new 
practices and looeptii then more readily then older farmers* 



To meet this change no major chaaies appear to be needed in the 
instructional program in the first tee years of high school* In the 
I junior and sealer years* as well ss for grades 13 and lb* the curricula 
for students planning for careers in agricultural businesses is being 
adjusted to include not only courses in prodaetion agriculture but also 
in 



The lisjilsmaiitall in of the v/illia Study Gcmc&asion of schools* 
followed by new statutes already pessed by the legislature which Includes 
abolishment of the division of vocational education is expected to affect 
the adalnistration of all branches* It Is too early to neks any prediction 
of outoonss* 



> 



271 



TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 
BOSS AKD MBH 

toe of the nost successful means of fulfilling the required 30 
„_c-hours of Professional Improvement /ork for teachers is attendance 
at the Annual Vocational Summer School Conference. This year, the con- 
ferenoe was held at the Fitohburg State College during the week of 
June 20 to July 2* Approximately 750 teachers (men and women) were in 
attendance at this conference* 

The conference , as usual, was organised to provide instruction and 
information in specific fields for teachers who vers employed in those 
fields* While each one of the separate conferences were most successful, 
it would be difficult to pick the highlight of the entire conference* 
However, it can be very well said that some of the larger groups, as 
teachers of auto repair, machine shop, wave most fortunate in having the 
cooperation of the General Motors Corporation and various other industries 
who not on3y provide members of the instructional staff for the entire 
week, but sent representatives who were specialists in their particular 
field to address the groups* This also applied to teachers of Heme Economics, 
Adult rCoraeaaking, and Health Occupations* 

Demonstrations were given by outstanding teachers in the following 
fleldst Machine Shop, Electronics, Printing, and Carpentry* 

lectures were given also by the State Supervisor of Health Occupations 
and by the State Supervisor of the Trade and Industrial Education, Agri- 
cultural, Distributive Education, Home Economics, and Adult Homemaking 
Education* 

This year, at the Fitchburg State College Workshop, instructors of 
Sheet rtrtal were combined with teachers of Welding, so that each of these 
trades would receive instruction on total Fabrication and Precision Sheet 
fetal* In industry, there has been a definite crossover between Welding, 
Precision Sheet total, Sheet etal, and Fabrication of very heavy gauge 
sheet steel* Some of the new vocational-technical schools have established 
Mstal Fabrication Departments, which have tremendously powerful machines, 
seme with a capacity of forming one-quarter inch thick sheet steel* It was 
felt that all teachers in the Sheet /-total and .elding fields should have 
demonstrations of the use of this power equipment, in order that they would 
be abreast of the new developments in total Fabrication* Along with this 
very heavy metal fabrication, another development in Sheet fetal work, 
know as rstlslam Kmest total, he* been i;toar.:.ly h^cr^a^in^. Ml iJHVtSH 
has been brought about by the Electronics industry which demands cabinets 
made with great precision, sometimes with only a two or three thousandths 
of an inch tolerance* In the Precision Sheet total field, the layout work 
is one with the most aspects, and the use of special equipment for following 
this layout is needed* Therefore, demonstrations in rTecision Sheet total 
Fabrication were also given* Tfcis particular workshop was of thirty hours 1 



'47Z 



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of Booot'Ojtol, fHUtiig! •** ****! robrteoUon «n i» ot l io O t no . Ml 

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l*rrw*to&m $ m OmrwUttimm B i ul i j ioo rt IWioIi o o ooo Bwooo t t o rt Ibqt tbo 
gum flooorrioor ft* %»» iwo o o »* owlopiog a o t o»do rm t 4 oooroo o«*» 
Uoo for ooo* ywr *» «* f&ootrooioo TrolAlne ffcogpo*, it to )mN thot 



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tkot otaooJU 



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i^ iJwMidb 00* ijiii of a aMfa«io*dfeioio! Imnmnhbp toohoiool oroooajou 



A «O0jiM0P*0r OWOmBWOOHP w»«W O^W Ul^^kwW^F «■• A^^F^*"*"^^ ••^•MfcAMjj 

aoooral Ooof«to ft***, Ptttof told, loot 9mt> o*o oold two poor fir 
fortoor yiooilnpaorrt of ttto too* of a ooi Ptitog objbfooUooo frooi ow trodo 
of* oolioola* **> mgnautei I* ooootfio U»Jtt # to ostar into the 
Approntioo Pros*** «t mrntml gLootrio, for ftsrtbor tr«tAi*« la ofeUXod 
tratiw Aloo. far :*~xhioiBO Uotudiilooo. o faoctfle Aoorootioo Ifct&St&K 

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fogiort rooovaos *rooj ooo vsroo%or oil mo .apppowwoo inmni owooo n» 

oil |wyi*O f owo novo oaoooojoo boojo. frooj wui tro d o »*££ ooftoolo oon «wo •0011* 



AfOj|« tela yooar o um o oo ooro t oto o llofrort for oor Aa*o ^oetvoidoo 

Mrs. ooarooo ojmto ■otOiltotioil with tjtt Boor ooooooar for trclMlaoj $» 
mm t ■atmul mrT iMit iAhmm u^ vtuwl *l < wmiL iitral bftlonolfto* oatt hroko 



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(onto r«U) oftM »mo/ af our oohooXo oro maqsMas* ** **9 *** t i oahtfo 
iat to Ooto Is tho teo&oiool otMHOBMi In tho faroi«9B oot ooHeot* imirooi 
woro tmooototf «t tlo> WioMOgoa frodUdaf cotttor* OflttoaltoUooo ooro 
Ho24 %flth orotlltootji ond oodLXoosoi of oor tow Voo)OtlMMdL Sofeooio oflot liooiottoi 
^oootlonoX f otionto i 

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is ^oooooottootlo) lo too oooMmhm) of of f oot&ro oMllHnf tvooo trololng;* 
tflrtla tliooo ofl to il tt— m kows ftSviflor'r immooo oolar«, tboir iofluoaoo lo oorar 
ovio>ont to or<ftrldl&£ ooomook%o ■ruiliiiwifit ond in t&o rwvtoton of oiirrioaJ* 
ffli» Imnintmr oa to dotii 1a Irwin it rial amiftiMMu lot onlar do ftrnuM ooooftttooo 
loniiitio iioBitudblot oooiotoooo to loorfo tomiz^lns. but oloo to oil floo Xioloo 
of Toooltnrnol dtsoattioo to wooiolloii Im tMUt f?to*o» 



owl lo ■ijilnn tsoAfldLae oroojNooi oMUot woro tastXA ot too Stoto ffiftllioct ot 
llotrtwiii dorim tho oaoiiioi of 1965. och jr o ofout «oo ootoollobod to 
tools tooo i te ttrjifoMoiMO IoolIoio totolloji do 1 ooli ii ■ 1a Sooorvioorr Loot*s*otor 

Tyotuinfi . rcehaLojooo of ^woorrtoiooii ooot Qbb£ orsooo Tjooloi'ititi.. ttdUt jzrotift 
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lo ooo of tho ttiyuo floldo noiottnoott 



I 



Hat Minn woriiohoo **r Jwalor High 3«bMl oowaooXoro aad 2*ro*»r* 
of Outdone*, aMoh oao oo osooooafaX »t loot yoar*o ooafOi o aao , mi ooa~ 
Uaaod thlo yoor* ^raoUoalXy tfco aaao orgoalftaUoa 00* f*Xl«w*d Mfr*roay 
oatataadlag tootraotors cart dowoaatraUoao of tho aaapletlaa of o opootfio 
projoot la aach «f thoir flolda o© that thoa* 3aidaAOo Couaoolaro wmOd 
havo a fcattor 14m of tho typo «f laatraoUan feting «ffor*d lo our mt» 
tloaal ooiioolo. Thlo yoar alto, t&tlo particular grava rial tod lat *2ya»a 
aad Jardoe Coa^aay la lraf toa, ^oaobawotta, to tafeo a good lo** at tho 
typo of worte bala* ***• ** Xadaatry* It to aaaola*: fear llttl* aaay of 

t&OOO IttUrtaOO OMMUMAmP* lBw» OOOat th* Obj*Otl**# Of OOOaUOfiwX OdttOO- 

tloa or what taawOtry would ax$»ct froa jjraOaa *•» of raoattoaal aohoola* 
Iharoforo, this particular a&doaoo Norkohoa i» o airoa tly important far 

tao oiajpor ooaaaaltaff aod ,raldaao* of otartofito on o Jaa&or h i rift ooaooX 
Itvtli Ml that oaro >fttpll* # who r*ally wont aad aaod vocational odw O a ttoa» 
007 o» galct e d lata vocational co haolc bgr wOwaoolaao, oho kav*, at Xaoct, 
an a#prs«iatton of what the** yeaw% s wauXd expect to find la wall^ar&aaiaow 

vocational ilFOj^lMOa 

Bartne. tut flooal year l*a$ f aaea eaaaaele **• pat en to* preparatloa 
of iftjrte $tady ^million aa4 7'llot rrpcreac for the icntoolo, ooclo*o mmoal i 
and ether hendlae^c* flcimiic tho aeaoy eae act f nrtlmewl hi fro* ttaahinctocu 

WPW|i WW WJWW^W-W wwwWftOTwBW^^^W^^W w WT^W^»^^WW^W^w vjvs^r ^^^W^^^wjf ^^^^^mw *W^w W* w» wrw WJ»w^^wF*^WW^^^W Wf 9 ^Wi^t '"^WIBWwil^B W^Wrwwww 

we were «w«wiw to eat 00 aeasr of theee taroareae late oiioiotlftfi 00 mo irjuld 

#WP" tO wBBOx^w^BrwO 9 ^^ *WPW wT W'WO^' l^P^^W^* ^*wj^^pfl^^^^ ^^Ol^wWIVOO ^PIB> Www www W^BwF^wO* O^WOWOO^O ^TiO. ww^r^j|j^ Wkw* w^ 

Obaro %ho jerauttf roloo for aeto Ooaarwoaata 00 Imlwontlo 1 ihooo arotfroMO 



III af tor«*ooliool prograo for potoatloX drop < u t> 000 out into oparattoa 
at too QamftoB Stroot Jamior Ha«w S o ft o ol la woroaotor. tola oouroo eaa* 
otofiod of two isrowoo of 00*0 aad 000 gr0w# of gtrlo* taoro ooro 1^ ottitSoato 
la oooh f roup* too boyo opoad too hooro la too ***** 3aop for a porlod of 
10 woolco* Ihlo ooaslod with 0X000 jwldoaoo, utodob ooomlotod of hoao rlatto 
plus tadlrlduaX falowooo oaooloao 9 pXoat rlolto t aa4 vialto to too E«dXo^» 
oant Sooarltgr CJf floo, goto tho 0070 a aottor 00X00UX0 oldUl If ttsoy oaooo 
to Xoovo oobool or ohaaoa 4ool4o <m a unit tro4o for tholr alga ■ o m o oX 
OwToor* tao glrXo oaooil W 000*0 la too Poo* tradoo aad 10 tojoko la tao 
Jfarooo UA ?rogr«4». toojr hod rlalto to aoooitalo aad avrataf aoaoo 9 pXoo 
tao ^Odaaoo, oto», that owat oita too boyo* arogr-a-- Bota of taooo pro- 
craoo ooro rory oaoeooafal, JrodiiaUoa oaorolooo vara aold aad oorUfloaio. 
ooro i^oooatod to ld> oat of tao h$ ottidoato that otortod tho ooaroo« 

^^^^ m W w ^*w*^^w *arww ww w?*^wibwO 0l*^0OM '^^^w ^OWBOT ^wW^wlwOr '0J' W^ic^O^ 9)l*aWfcwJ|^^wl^WW0P OWBfjWWm OWO*w*»Bf OJ OOwt 

taa WwrwOwtor "aoHo SoitooXo aad It oao rotod ay tao ooaoaX ooaalttoo to 
iaotaXX tal* oaoolal aooaoatloaaX ^ooarotory Coaroo la taroo of too floo 
Jualor hl^i ooaooXa la woroootor durlag tao ooaool day, work 8tM0> ^ogroao 
vara triad oat for Urn aoala of Juaa aad aroood 00 oao^ooafaX that 35 

wwwww^wwwWOww 1 wO^WOr jpwwwi ww wnOrJ^wwwO*0w» dwOw w)awJp\^P JjwaT^wWHF^wwp wXOPw? Ow*wP wWV^w^wwFJp W»wnww wwOwIfw 

Bvory oosoaadty f roa tbo top omooatlro doaa to tao oaotodlaa aooao 
to bo oatbaood aboat thlo aro<raa« tboy oro «otUan aom: doao that aovor 
woold aaro aaaa doaa If It woro aot for tfclo arojoot* lao aoyo aad tholr 
paraato 000a gyatofaX for tho oaaortaalv to aara aoaoy to aoXp ooatjjaw 
taolr wdaoowioa* Sat ooaool offlolalo f«*X that talo oUX ao a aoXa la 
waoplftg ao food oarleo la tao ropOar day ooao^U 



874 



«* tha a«nft> &*i*$ t&t* J**r # pro*$ra»a vara In operation 
daring thlft ftswaar far tha potential Aro>^uU in oofganeUon nlth tfe* 
tfarfc statv *TOgran# tfc»at a r ftg r aaa : are afcort £aa*dlal e*ur0*a t rata 
Ifcaftaaatn** Fla«tra*%«ttania*l ;Va*iaa» # food aradaa, and ftaeraatton, ftt*. 

BttviftC thft fiaaal y**r 1966, nan? allot pro^raaa f *r t&i m iaa ai a, 

9^r^r fti SF^^T^aWPftlW^P* ftVw iftpft^ajP "wWl wn^PB^a^aftp^Paa^a^aft ♦ *ft p 1 ** ^P^P ft'lPh^P^P' anavaaan- ar^F v&^Pim*m^ 4k ^ ftfti-W ^^'ft'' 

thai taara it ft grant anad f*r ranirtial nark and mpgrftftlftf «f tbaae au*kmta, 

SUtft Snparrtaora 1ft tan Vocational Dl?i*lon ftt* Zrm&BatXy aaUed 
anon to aaeiat tfca favi«ioa of Baifnraltjr Eatanaloa la tna ovftlaaUoft «T 
p«wni ano ftfft ftftftljdtti far Riga School F^alvalana? Cnrtiflcatna. 



l*ift ftvlaion of JUtdt*~9iftaal Strvlftftft and tan Ubr*r> QUialan 
trlbatad thair ftfttvtftftft fthfta nftadnd to tha fAvtfttaa ftf Vocational *facatio». 

|» . uiU IMfttM tl IftftftlMftftl MMVMM Hi ltd MM MJllWWft *w! 
eouaaattn? aarvioa, *»t alt* onV «** Sanlcr Ja^andaur la ohar^t It 

baaonaa matnitiijr ftftaatlftftft tft call far aaaiatajico froa julrtioaa paraonaal 
aoniTHOtiid alth janaril atfmalcia, 

Clftftft mlfttiona ara atlll a*iataiand with tan rUTiaioa of laachor 
Otrtlflaatiaa and ?l*aaaoni In rafaranaa ta t^rUfloatian af taaabara 
of aftftftftfldft aanjaeta* 

Sftpanrlaora >f tha lariaton af Vocational "donation aartra an conniUanft 
far a ft nona'nry acVal naalaatla* by tha lor r^land AaaoniaUon of collagen 

and Snnondarr Saftaola* 

apmndarr fcaaartan i an tan jajanaratcry larai ara a&iatantljr balag 
rnrlaad and oraaalftad* 

<»ra of t^a ewer* ta ■aadtarale ctffarla^a aner* «a Ha^taamtlaft ftad ialanea 
In adcflUoa to tha raXata4 ark baing affarwt. Thl« raxjolraa, la ftaaa 
emm* M a y - arganl aatleo of aix and aavon iwrlad daya to an aigfct pariai 
• ftt iliial i, ftnd ft atrlat ndftft r a m a a ta tn« <sUla>*a ajUa^aar day raqul r aao n t, 

^oatHMaondarjr ?ra>grft*ft 1ft tha oiUaa tf ^rin^flald «a/S Hftrftaatar 
ara aonUmin- ta axpand* Spring flal-i a.^anad lta* aaa; taftt^dftal Xnfttltutft 
Baildin^ and tfareaatar aoatlmjaa a^natmaUon an tfeair building wtiah tflU 
ba orpauad in ti» naftr ffttara* Addaat ta tha ftoaraa auUina ta Urn tftftnanlaaJL 
Taahnol!5 ;-, Ma«trani« Taahnol^f and fomlw aalgn ?paft^l«^r oauraaa 
at ^^ngflaXd nra taaan ajanarlaaa eontraUad a^i^aant and ESM (Elaatr ;cal 

ja'*ftrsft ^ftftMnttti) «M«ti Shettld hata a tvwa^^Nttft inpftftt la oria^io,, *nha 
of farin^a nn in dau aith currant patamU** in Urn naniftfaaturing induatry. 

Foat^aaaoadar^ pra^ra>«a ara particularly arldaat In tftft aaa affort 
no part a/ snail 



on tha part of *naU aoaaMoiUaa to raglanalisa* JSn^ftftla la on 
daaala^naatft* Oaea tNft^t af aa «uita I* onljr at a **&*&*%* ftohool 
laval, thaaa ara batag lnt roda aa d - mitt aa optical tanhaal«gy v to^tbar 
with an ^pigrftdlaf la othar fiald $ 



- i 



i 






«75 



ronrtyaUc Saparrlaory Twitting f frt ayaaa w*t* aoaanatad t&roa£x»st 
tfao yoar, with » total anrolXiwtat of 8*7. 

Savant? (70) dlffaraat orsaoiaaUon* aara wmd in li XoaaliUaa 
throat tfea 3t*ta. 



jtan ^i^pTllwWa ^Wp IBBBwaWt ^wO* * ^O^a^Bw- W^W WB^nn* ^P0) OBH^^a ^F^(jOOBwjW^n^B»WBj W B»oanaiBiB^nBJMaBT^p ^n aO^B^^F*? • 

leal Control tan!** la taa *** motor* VomtlmmX Kl«n mmX and um 
SprinfffltW T*ada KM* *d*ool ml A* Gorta* E n aAy »o nt ftt ttia «oatfiaXd 
Trada *&#> Softool* It t« naoaaaary tnat tho otorrieul* t» r«flw4 la 
ardor to provido Mm of r«ctdit training in tha aao or t$da aqB lpa a n t* 

Ifea oorrlauXon la tfao Jraanit Arta rapartnoot at $»rlngllol4, 
Hslyofcn, and Attta&wro, wan tlao rorlaod to adaqaataly «W #» Utaat 
tonhstqaoa 111 tl» graphio **%* flald* 

Boring tha aoni*j? oonool yaor, a progran aotltlnd " pUetl Ito&ainlaa* 
wlU fco offarad at tna amaatar Xaduatrlal ?ac ieal Inotttuta. Hsi« la 
* two»>yaar pragraa aad mi aatabUa^od at tea inatataoaa af taa OaHaal 
induatriaa la tha rforaantar araa« aylalGna haon aa«a nana la taa <>*ta 
?*oaaaata* ^>1f» «t tan Soriogflold Trada MA** «oh al to aaaa oltfc tho 
MMr $ l«atarania dnvlowa ablate havo boon addad to tftla 



Da? iraatar laaraaoa ingloaal faaatlaaal fnohnleal Sannol all! opaa 
ia Sofrtaaaof and aurrieala nam aaaa davolopod to aaat tha aaada of 
anvaral dlf foraot troaaa aad oacunaUoon bain? of forari • 

Carrieula la *lao noing dnroloead for tha aatteipatad apoaln; of tea 
aiaaaatana ¥al2ny aalo&al ?oaatlonal TiBhnlail &#*ool» ItttajilioBBlain 
lafloaal VaanUoaal «l# 5o6ooX # $3aa HlUa liaa&aaal ^aaaUooaX «Mti 
ffga art f aatf taa (front (Saaa Cad Hadaaal <ooaUoaal taahateal Seaooi. 
Ia ttNMa aaHooXa that ara aat a* y»t la aparaUtai f XaMaalora aaaa 
aaploynd la ordar to {waparo curricula and ordar Urn atoaaaar/ agnipaaaU 
thla proaodara wa» flrat atartad *imti taa North adaaa - to*rlM aa ^Caaa 
tealoaal Tmaif 1 iiiln Tnnantnt aal Aiiaal. filatrlat anaaad aad baa daa aa d aaat 



t» ao^a with taa "raaldattt 1 * onNMraanay aaaaaia of ttraiuiae t&a aaaa* 
alajfadf ■uooai' •aopl^ad ^ <3l #■ oafuoyady and hlj^i aofv>aX flvap«taata 9 faarulHan 

whioh vara not of farad ia t^o ^ta«a*aidad Day V^^aaUonaX 3aaoo.; . irty 
alota-rio^r laaaaar rairtiag oXaaaaa aara astabliaaad ia atra%agla araaa 
of tha sut«o. Hiaaa oooaaaUoao laaXadadt Flatting, VatatPlaary Alda # 

t "^"" ^^ ^ ^$^^ w^^» ^^^■^^i^^^^^^^^gp^^p ?"mmMaa^|ift ■woB'^wo ^w^t _ *"^^p^wia 4a^^^"'^^H|i^P ^^^nawiaa^a^aawHa ^^n^jfiaw^a^^^ww^^Bai^^^^^^H 

aftllfQBitiMj. hotal iNMAaaaaat. aaal ai aaatiliaj raoalr* aaton raaa4rlaa* 
mm rajaalldloa^ aaa iUU a attaadaata 9 oaatadlaaa, aaat aattara, w&~ 



All taaah«ra of a^raataaaatda tralainK, trado aataaalaa^ aad $m~ 
pmmt flrra l a na a n t and fralainf $m\ pra^raaa aaro rmv^kfti to oanpXata 
a thirty oXaaa>aoar taaafear»«ralalaf aoaraa* Saaaaatlaaa aad Joa aaaXyala 
aara aaaarad togatfear with Xaaaaa i0a»alaa aad aaaaaatraUoa ta<ah1af la 
thla ahort lataaalra oaarao* fmrln^ tha yaar 9 oaraaa aara oaadaatad b 
tha ataf f of taaohar*trai t»r» or oa Saturday ay $**%* $a|iarrlaara of 



276 



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'C 4 8 



TBADE, DIDUSTRIAL, AND HOME BCGKCKIGS EHJCATION 

02SI3 AND WOKEH 

Following an experimental jrogram at Boston Trade High School for 
Girls last year, it was decided to continue too remedial reading class 
for special students having limited reading ability and comprehension. 
Follow-up studies prove the north of this special training unit in 
terms of pupil retention In school* 

Due to anticipated cost of replacing outmoded equipment (in teras 
of per pupil cost) it has been voted by the Governing Board of Trustees 
to coordinate the Printing Department of the Worcester Girls Trade High 
School with the Worcester Boys Prude High School commencing with the 
1965-1966 school year* 

With the completion of a new wing at the Springfield Trade High 
School, space has been mads available in the Girls 9 School, which space 
has been remodeled and equipped as additional bake shop area* An 
additional Bake Shop instructor has been added to the staff thereby 
strengthening the instructional program and making it possible to 
serve a larger number of pupils in the Food Trades program* 

The new Greater Lawrence Vocational and Technical Institute due 
to open in September 196$ wiU offer a h year program in Food Service* 

In September 1965 Holyoke High School will have completed department 
renovations and is due to commence a 2 year training program in Food 
Service at secondary school level and also an K*D*T*A* Food Trades 



The Annual Conference for Vocational Home Iconomics teachers was 
held on October 30, 1961;* Sixty teachers participated in this all** 
day conference. The theme was related to present trends in Bone 
Economic 3 Education affecting Secondary Programs* A keynote speech 
by Br* Constance B* Jordan, Bead, Home Economics Education Division, 
Fraadnghaa State College, provided background information* Other 
aspects introduced were: Family Life Abroad, an illustrated lecture 
by lfi.es Genevieve Wheeler, attendant of the International Conference 
of Home loonoaics in Paris, France; Contributions of Future Homemakers 
of America, presented by ore* Marian Wilson, Executive Secretary,- 
Massachusetts Future Homemakers ef America; lecture, end question- 
answer period of an overview and related implications ef the Vocational 
Education Act of 1963 to Home Economies Programs* 

The State director of Vocational Education called an all-day 
meeting on Becentoer 1, 1961;, of the Birecters of the Trade High 
Schools for Girls, the Departaent Heads ef the all-day Vocational 
Homemaking Schools, and of the State Supervisors of Trade and 
Industrial Education for Girls and Women, of Distributive Education, 
ef Borne Economics Education, and of Practical Kurse Education and other 
Health Occupations* The purpose of this meeting was to project ideas 
and earliest suggestions of ways to implement the Vocational Education 
Act of 1963. This meeting was held at the Springfield Trade High 
School, with about fifteen persons participating in the discussion* 



( 






'4?ii J 



A State Supervisor of Home Economics Education participated with 
approximately 200 leading home economists in the American Home Economics 
Workshop on "Working With Low Income Families," conducted at the 
University of Chicago, March 15 - 19* As an outcome of attendance at 
these meetings, she has been instrumental in formulating plans for the 
State Home Economics fall Workshop which will be patterned after the 
Illinois conference* Informative tapes purchased at the workshop will 
be shared with Vocational Educators throughout Massachusetts* 

The State Supervisors of Home Economics education attended the 
Federally-sponsored Regional Conference held in Boston during the 
week of February 1 - li* The Staff members of the Vocational Division 
of the Department of Education in the New England States were represented 
at all meetings* Information gained from these meetings has been related 
to other vocational educators throughout the State by means of area 
meetings and conferences as well as direct implementation within specific 
school communities* 

A State Supervisor of Borne Economics Education was a member of the 
Committee for evaluation of the Murdock Junior-Senior High School in 
Winchendon, Massachusetts, representing the New England Association 
for Accreditation of Colleges and Secondary Schools* This committee 
of 15 persons worked on this project December 6-9, 196U. The 
areas of concentration for the Supervisor were Health Services, Health 
Education, and Home Economics* Commendations and recommendations 
were made relative to each department following a concentrated period 
of investigation and observation* 

A program of curriculum revision has been initiated and Is being 
conducted by the State Supervisors of Home Economics during the 
months of July and August 1965, at Fitchburg State College in 
Fitchburg, Massachusetts* The plan is designed to develop a guide 
usable to the teacher as she plans and supplements the published 
structured device to meet the needs within her own teaching community* 

As a result of the passage of the Vocational Education Act of 
1963, Vocational Education In Home Economics in Massachusetts has a 
two-fold objective, namely; to provide instruction which will enable 
individuals and families to improve their family life through more 
effective utilization of human resources, and to develop wage earning 
programs centered upon occupations which use home economics knowledge 
and skills* 

Subject matter committees met to develop the main body of the 
guide for each area of content* Each committee, insofar as possible, 
consisted of a Vocational Home Economics teacher, a General Home 
Economics teacher, and a College or University Subject Matter 
Specialist* The State Supervisors of Home Economics served as 
coordinating consultants for the groups* Written materials from the 
Federal office have been utilized in developing the plan* 

The State Supervisors of Home Economics have continued to work 
with the State Supervisor of Occupational Information and Vocational 
Guidance following the occupational surveys which have been made to 
determine the need for proposed Regional Schools particularly. 
Consideration has been given to the need for Home Economics Programs 
as well as Girls' Trade and Industrial Programs. 






< 



A State Supervisor of Home Economics Education participated with 
approximately 200 leading hem economists is the American Hose Economics 
Workshop en "Working With hm Income Families, " conducted at the 
University of Chicago, March 1$ m 19. As an outcome of attendance at 
these meetings, she has been instrumental in formulating plans for the 
State Home Economics Fall Workshop which mill be patterned after the 
Illinois conference. Informative tapes purchased at the Workshop mill 
be shared with Vocational Educators throughout Massachusetts* 

The State Supervisors of Borne Economics Education attended the 
Federally-eponsoreoV-Regional Conference held in Boston during the 
meek of February 1 - U. The Staff members of the Vocational Division 
of the Department of Education In the Hew England States mere represented 
at all meetings* Information gained from these meetings has been related 
to other vocational educators throughout the State by means of area 
meetings and conferences as moll as direct Implementation within specific 
school communities. 

A State Supervisor of memo Economics Education mas a member of the 
Committee for evaluation of the Burdock Junior-Senior High School In 
mlnohendon, Massachusetts, representing the Ism England Association 
for Accreditation of Colleges and Secondary Schools* This committee 
of U persons worked on this project December 6-9, 196U. The 
areas of concentration for the Supervisor were Health Services, Health 
Education, and Home Economics. Commendations and recommendations 
were mads relative to each department following a concentrated period 
of investigation and observation* 

A program of curriculum revision has been initiated and is being 
conducted by the State Supervisors of Home Economics during the 
months of July and August 1565, at Fitchburg State College in 
Fltohburg, Massachusetts, the plan la designed to develop a guide 
useable to the teacher as she plans and supplements the published 
structured device to meet the needs within her own teaching community. 

As a result of the passage of the Vocational Education Act of 
1963, Vocational Education in Heme Economics In Massachusetts has a 
two-fold objective, namelyj to provide instruction which will enable 
individuals and families to Improve their family life through more 
effective utilisation of human resources, and to develop wage earning 
programs centered upon occupations which use heme economics knowledge 
and skills. 

Subject matter committees met to develop the main body of the 
guide for each area of content. Each committee, insofar as possible, 
consisted of a Vocational Home Economics teacher, a General Heme 
Economics teacher, and a College or University Subject matter 
Specialist. The State Supervisors of Home Economics served as 
coordinating consultants for the groups* written materials from the 
Federal office have been utilised in developing the plan* 

the State Supervisors of Home Economics have continued to work 
with the State Supervisor of Occupational Information and Vocational 
Guidance following the occupational surveys which have been made to 
determine the need for proposed Regional Schools particularly. 
Consideration has been given to the need for Heme Economies Programs 
as well as Girls 1 Trade and Industrial Programs* 



S581 

the Department of Audio-Visual Aids has cooperated most effectively 
In aaking aTailable to the Vocational BLvisicn, materials for use at 
the various meetings and conferences throughout the year. 

As formerly, the State Supervisor of Home Economics has worked 
closely with the Division of Teacher Certification and HLacement in 
connection with the approval of Boms Economics teachers for Junior and 
Senior High Schools* 

the ass Home Economics-Science building which was opened in - 
September, 1962, hasprovided vary adequate facilities for teacher- 
training. Saw AudicMvisual aids equipment and equipment for reproducing 
teaching materials have been added this year* The education laboratory 
has mads possible the use of more extensive teaching techniques and 
demonstration lessons* 

Pilot programs at the Adult level have been initiated at David 
Hale fanning Trade Sigh School* These have been "The friendly Visitor" 

sad "The Visiting Homemaker." 

The State Supervisors of Home Economics Education visited two 
communities in answer to Inquiries relative to establishment of a 
Vocational Home Economies Program* Rockland High School and Tantasqua 
Regional High School are considering instituting a Vocational Program, 
but have not submitted a confirmation to date* 

Xt is gratifying to report that one (1) new Chapter affiliated 
with the Massachusetts Future Homemakers of America this year in 
North Brookfield, Massachusetts. Owing to a combination of factors 
resulting in the necessity of a two-session program in the Arlington 
High School, this Future Homemakers of America Chapter has not been 
able to function actively this year* There are fifteen (15) 
affiliated F*H*A* Chapters this year with a membership of four hundred 
and eighty seven (U8?) girls* 

The preservice teacher education program at the State College in 
Framinghaa has been under extensive study this year* Two education 
course outlines - Principles of Teaching and Methods and Materials plus 
Educational Psychology - wars carefully analysed for content and duplication 

The Teacher Educators and the Vocational Supervisor revised this 
material into one intensise education course which will incorporate 
general principles of teaching and methods and materials* 

An "Occupational Information" program has been initiated in 
Worcester, Massachusetts, at the junior high school level* 

The persons involved in this pilot project were fifteen (1$) girls 
at the ninth (9th) grade level* The pupils ware selected en the basis 
of having qualities Indicative of potential dropouts and shewing 
evidence of need for remedial work* Selection was mads by guidance 
counselors within the Worcester School System. Following selection, 
home visits were mads to acquaint parents with the purpose of the 



The objectives of title project were to acquaint pupils with employment 
procedures, wage earning opportunities and with further preparatory 
programs of employment training* 



(I 



- 



*£&<? 



> J 



Following a survey indicating potential employment possibilities 
within the scope of the foods and clothing, programs for a course la 
Cooperative Foods and Cooperative Clothing are being planned for the 
school year 196£-1966 at Saugus Sigh School. 

Adult TToMomVI ni and Craft 

It it the responsibility of the State Supervisor to arrange workshops 
for Professional I mprov em ent at the Vocational Summer School* Other 
workshops are organised throughout the state as required and deemed 
feasible* In order to assist teachers of adult homeaaking to fulfill 
the requirement of 30 clock-hours of professional improvement, the following 
«ero organised! Springfield - Art in Clothing, Art for the Homsmaker; - 
Worcester - Tailoring Techniques for teachers of dressmaking! Barnstable - 
Contemporary Design for Homemakers. 

At the Annual Vocational Conference, at Fitchburg State College, 
the purpose has been to stress methods of teaching, to review current 
technical skills and knowledge, to update teachers on new treads end 
developments as they affected the adult hememnldng field* The following 
workshops were-c endnote d at this Conference t Clothings Fur; care and 
repair of fur - the making of small accessories, muglish Smocking; 
techniques and methods of adapting to various types of clothing for 
mother and daughter, Pattern Drafting; principles of making own patterns, 
Garment Alteration; training for potential workers In an alterations 
room or In a dress shop; Flower Arranging! In keeping with the 
increasing use of flowers la the home; Knittings Curricula for knitting 
instructions were reviewed and revised; Two commercial concerns loaned 
garments for fashion shows; Millinery! For professional milliners to 
exchange ideas and to be upgraded • Millinery for Bressmakersi Methods 
of using coat and dress material for matching accessories; lug Braiding 
and interior coordination; Tailoring techniqies; drapes and Curtains; 
Foods) catering for homemakers •» meal planning and nutrition - prepared 
and served a buffet* 

The State Supervisor of Adult Homeaaking was Invited to attend local 
school comadtties and advisory committee meetings* The purpose of 
these conferences was to discuss organisation of new programs as well 
as e xpan s i on and revision of programs already organised* Other visits 
were made by the State Supervisor on invitation of those Interested In 
establishing or re-establishing a program of adult homeaaking* During 
these visits the supervisor discussed the requirements necessary for 
the establishment of Adult Homeaaking Programs* These requirements 
included ton approval factors, which must be made before State 
reimbursement can be recommended for approval* 

The State Supervisor was President of the National Association of 
State Home Economics Supervisors* She attended the AVA Steering 
Committee In Washington, planned the AVA Program and secured speakers* 
Permission was not granted to attend the Annual A7A Convention la 
Minneapolis, so Massachusetts did not have the honor of a presiding 
officer* 

The State Supervisor cooperated with the United Community Services 
of Greater Boston* This association puts on the 6o~Flus Program each year* 



2Hd 3 



Thia i* itlindai ay *»•«* five thrMeand (9Kfc) aamlor eiti **na 
vho cvs en f*v*t Iflo&lly, by jjubllc transportation or ara c* Tied oa 
baa » a flroa aiaaay 190) aaiaiunitl aa aufroaafteg Itoataa* 7b* nuti 
flau a r aiaor ims raasoaalfcle for iiltitil nil afaoarasioa aad miiartlatiia if 
aavaatyfiYo (?>} daamatrators. 

Tha Stat* Soparriaor rapraaanta tha Dapartaaat of aaaaat laa a* 
tha Saw &iglaad Craft Coanell* nia groaa aaate thraa ttnaa a yaar* 
Ita paraoaa la to laaraaaa tnteraat la tha craft program in tha Haw 
Xnglaad are*, to aaasavafa taaahara aa well «a ara/tawaa, aa aa g rad a 

aa a^^aaaaa^^a> *aaaj ^"0* ^^^^wt^^B'^^^Rm^&^&'^Rmpwj ^^w^w» ^^^ ^y^^^^aj^^^^ ^w^^^w m# ^a*a^a ™^ai s^ma^aa)aa'^waaaa^Maai aw^ 

f aira and aawlnara far arafta^aa ihr^aglMKii tha area. Thia y**r, «m 
of ita «aal» ia %a prorlda aa oattlat tm m*m&ag araftaaan. Tha 
aXhibit of aaoh nark adll ba aa diaplay at Fhoaa 1*1* >d nivuraity* 

tha State daaarriaor vorka with Taaafeor Traiaara thraa ttaaa 
vaarly an ptaiattag and iwialn? tha taaabar traiaiag eatllna* Each 
taaaaar aaaalosa bar oaa aouraa aatlia** Capiaa of thaaa *r* aat ^ada 
Aisd ara ao* available* The eiar eae of ntudjr ami eaajeet to e-netant 
rev leloa and ara developed larflvldttally togr aaaibafa to ba imia 
aeaaiagfal a* ths^ tesap abreaat of aev lea** la related eeottpetlofta* 

Cnndldatoo ft* taaihlmi Adult tfaaaaafelae *#j» ** net here tha 
rmiulrit high aaboal •duoatloa ara rafarrad ta t?ia 3tata al«jb M*sm% 
iojalvalaaay ¥&*$**-> in tha Mvialaa of JrJL^raitcr "xtanat\Mi* laay 
taaotton i atailad tha at tlv aa of thia aatvlaa aa aatain thalr high 
aehool aojutiaaXaaaer eartU iaataa. Tha state aajavtiaar aaaparataa 
in ay a la atS a g aora iayarianaa toward high aofeool oradlt. Kreniag 
aei« -»1 taaoaata aao wiah to «a oa to ooUaga ara j^ldad ia thair 
ohoiaa of oarricuiaa* 

Thraa^waat tha flmwwaaailth tbara ara 1^ aaaMaaitlaa vith aetiva 
pg o fi a wa «r with prall iaary an 

aaavatioa a 1? undar aaViaaaast] 

approod^ ta^y 36^000 adult ha aaa aWu «taand ^mm 41*9—* itoiam 
ta«4%t bar XtftS lnatmotora. 



*r vith saall iaar/ orgaalaatiaa plana sadar aa/* (15 la 



iJ84 

PRACTICAL NUH3£ EDUCATXQH 
OTHER HEALTH GCCUPATIOW 

A concentrated program toward professional improvement for the 
instructors in fc;e field of practical nurse education and other health 
training programs is offered during the annual stunner conference, conducted 
yearly during the last week of June. 

This year the conference was held at Fitchburg State College, 
June 28 - July 2, 196$, and was focused on t e future implementation of 
the new Criteria and Curricalma for Practical Morse Education r ecently 
approved by the Poard of Registration in Nursing for 55 State of assac usetts* 

The major Inservice education effort was at the Professional Improve- 
ment Conference in Fitchburg, June 1°65* At t is time resource personnel 
from the Boston University, Boston College and ot. ers participated by 
presenting material dealing with the major curriculum revisions required 
by the Board of Registration in Nursing* This was focused on the needs 
of the students and instructors in the practical nursing schools* 

During the year the Supervisors participated also in the Annual 
Midwinter Directors 1 Conference, March 1»2, 196£, and was focused on 
the interpretation of P*L* 33*210* The supervisors conducted panel sessions 
and buzs sessions. Approximately 70-30 local directors end other educators 
were present at this conference* 

In addition to these major conferences, t e supervisors attended 
ee many local advisory committee meetings as possible* At these meetings 
the supervisors described the current developments in practical nurse 
education, other health occupations, and attempted to assist wit? solutions 
of local problems* Enoournfement wee offered to eeeh group to continue 
needed expansion of practical nurse programs and to develop other health 
occupations training to meet the needs of the community* The responses 
from the local advisory group often indicate areas of need which are considered 
either in conferences with nurse coordinators, or at various faculty meetings* 

Assistance In preparation for the professional improvement conference 
was rendered by the Audio-visual division* Aside from this, there has 
been no significant cooperation between other State education personnel 
and the Supervisor of Health Occupation Training* 

Teaeher-Training is offered annually at the Fitchburg State College* 
The present plan of the ome economics teachers and the nursing Instructors 
for the 60 eleek-hour teacher-training Is very suorsessful, thus far* 
However a revision In the program is currently contemplated* Regional 
training centers mlnfrt prove nore adequate for ^tate wide needs* At present 
housing is Inferior at Fitehburg State College* 

Orientation or employment is offered V local directors and by visits 
of the Supervisor* 

There are seventeen post-secondary preparatory programs of practical 
nurse education established under the auspices of vocational education 
In Massachusetts* These programs are centered in the vocational schools 
of the state, with geographical distribution to provide easy access for 

itlng students* All utilize local hospital facilities* A new Criteria 



and Curriculum Standard is to be implemented in all programs* One prograai 
is bein ; conducted as a pilot program utilising the new Curriculum which 
is organized on a twelve month basis. Ordinarily fifteen months are required 
for this program* 

the total number of programs includes the five conducted under Manpower 
Development 4 training Aet funds. 

the results of the licensure examinations indicate that out of 29 
graduating from various schools, the vocationally funded programs rank 
from approximately 2nd to l£th in the state. 

The emphasis continues the needs of the chronically ill and geriatric 
patients. More and more frequently, the effort is beinr made to obtain 
clinical experience for students in suits le nursing homes or geriatric 
care units* 

It is custromary for these programs to art it two classes a year, 
once they become well established* Because of the implementation of the 
new Curriculum, increasing work loads, and lack of faculty, some of these 
programs are planning to a ! nit only one class a year, with stronger 
integrated class and clinical experience. 

the national trend toward younger students is reflected in the 
incoming classes. Many candidates are entering the September class follow- 
ing their graduation from hi#i school. 

There are problems relating to recruitment of too many applicants 
for the well-established programs and too few for the newer programs* 
Efforts to build a strong publicity program and recruitment campaigns 
continue to be needed in more isolated areas and in newer programs. 

At the present time in Massachusetts, there are four Dental 
Assistant Programs, nine months in length, on a post-hi >h school level; 
one in Springfield, North Adams, Worcester and one at Northeastern School 
of Continuing FducatS on in Beaton* The latter two are funded from the 
Manpower Development and Training Act. 

there are three Surgical Assistant Programs, one in Springfield, 
another in Worcester, snd a third in North Adams. The program consists 
of a combination of class and operating room experience and is aoproxiraately 
nine months in length including the internship period. 

There are two -4edical Laboratory Assistant Programs, one is ten 
months and the other is fifteen months in length, one in Springfield and 
one at Northeastern University under M.D.T.A. funds, the program consists 
of a combination of class and laboratory experience, including the extern- 
ship oeriod. 

There is a Physical therapy Assistant Program in Springfield, this 
is a nine month program which has just completed its first year successfully. 

There are two Medical Assistant Programs, nine months in length, 
one in Springfield and the other in North Adams. 

the evening trade extension programs for Licensed Practical Nurses 
have continued in some of the more active centers, these include 

Springfield, Worcester. These programs are of great assistance in upgrad- 
ing the practice of these already licensed. 



<58 



The problems of strengthening teacher education curriculum are many. 
The supervisors continue to seek the assistance of higher education to 
consider plans for the introduction of practical nurse teaching within 
the Master's curriculum. 

Teachers for adult pro gr ams are supervised by their local directors 
and given intinerant teacher^tralnlng during the supervisor's visit. 

There are no formal research studies being conducted at present* 
Nurse faculty mem'aera of local programs constantly evaluate the on-going 
curricula and are revising plans in keeping with the findings. The usual 
five year follow-up studies are maintained regarding the licensed practical 
nurses* Therefore, the faculty members of the program are aware of the 
stability and general work performance of the graduates. Results on 
licensure examinations are also studied in evaluation of programs. 

fbrmal research is limited by the scarcity of personnel who are 
adequately prepared for such activity* Ti» number of nurses or vocational 
educators who possess a doctoral preparation is very slight in Massachusetts* 
However, the Supervisor has dons a small scale study based on failures 
on llcens'irc examinations to discern factors contributing to such failures* 
The purpose of this study was also to stimulate a creative positive attitude 
toward the value of developing similar research studies on the part of 
faculty members in the schools* Tills was presented at the Fitchburg State 
College* 

It is necessary to have basic research in t v * area of transfer of 
learning hy students in order to trily evaluate the content and length 
of time needed in our programf also, to continue research on factors which 
lead to success in practical nursing* Wis need to better evaluate the 
various pre-nursing aptitude tests currently available* 

One pilot program was conducted last year at Springfield Trade Hlgb 
School for the training of physical therapy assistants* Seven students 
were enrolled in this course* All were employed following coreoletion of 
the program* A full program Is being conducted this Fall* 

Total Practical Nurse Programs, 17 j Other Health Occupations - 
liental Assistant* u; Medical Assistant, 2j Surgical Assistant, 2j and 
Medical Laboratory Assistant, 2* Holding power is approximately !$%• 



I 




Total U h k 

F U27 U06 

Dental Assistant F U£ U3 

Kedlcal Assistant F 32 30 30 100 — — • — • 

Practical Nursing * U U U 100 — - — 

F 297 286 2£7 J$ 15 9 5 

Surgical Technician F 53 U7 hi 100 — - — ■ — 



t 



k 



c 






The Dental Assistants had evening extension courses conducted in 
Springfield, North Adams, end Worcester. The Medical Laboratory Assistant 
course was conducted in Springfield* 

Much time and effort has been and will be spent in the various 
programs on local curriculum changes. The State Board of Registration 
in ? r ursing has approved a new Curriculum which is to be officially imple** 
Bested by September of 1966. A five week Curriculum Research Group Studfcr 
was held at Fitchburg ~tate College. Faculties from the various schools 
of practical nursing participated in this research, the purpose of which 
is to eventually develop a basic guide for Practical Nurse Education in 
this 3tate. A total or 20 faculty members from nine schools participated 
in this project. 

With the use of active local Advisory :omn&tteea, the curriculum 
for Physical therapy Assistant lias been developed* 

The Dental Assistants Program has been revised and better developed* 
Other Health Occupations have also received suggestions from local groups 
for the improv e m ent of the programs* 

The major new developments in practical nurse education were the 
formation of additional sections for the retraining of unemployed persons 
under the 'Manpower Development and Training Act* These sections have 
been added to the already established practical nurse programs in Boston* 
Springfield* and Worcester* Additional sections will be opened in Worcester* 
County* and Leominster* this fall* 



Two entirely new practical nurse pro -rams were developed in Leominster 
and Haverhill under M*D*T*A* It is expected lad this project will supply 
local hospitals and nursing homes with badly needed licensed practical 
nurses* 

In the fall a new program for Dental Assistants will begin at 

Northeastern 'Jnivorsity under the M # D*T*A* 



The problem of recruitment of qualified nurse instructors becomes 
more acute as the nuci 1 er of size of programs increase* In endeavoring 
to open new sections* it is particularly difficult to maintain the same 
standards for qualifications of instructors* Colleges and universities 
are contacted* the Placement and Counseling Office of Massachusetts 
Association and individual referrals are accented* 



All candidates for teaching positions are interviewed personally 
and oaphasis is placed on locating nurses #10 are sincerely interested 
in practical nurse education, as well as those who have the proper academic 
and professional background* 

Following the submission of the names of approvable candidates* 
the local school eomnittees appoint the nurse faculty members. The 
supervisors attempt to encourage the stability of the faculty employment 
in ^r&ry way possible. This year, two coordinators from our regular, 
stabilized pro^^rar* have resigned in order to further their edn.oati.on* 



( 



5588 



There is a great need for better definitions of functions of personnel 
among the health and nursing team ■embers* lids research should be conducted 
by members of the professions and an educational consultant in order to establish 
objectives for the training programs* 

Research is needed on more effective methods of teaching in the 
health occupations* 

Research is need e d on better patterns of teacher education for the 
instructors in the health occupations* 

The supervisors have cooperated in surveys to determine the needs 
for health occupations training in several coamunities and regional schools 
being ajfceasj sjs e 

These include schools in Quincy, one in the Brockton area, Cape Cod 
area, in the Seuthbridge area, the Canton area, and in the ireenfield area* 

At the present tine of these surveys the hospitals, nursing homes, 
doctors and dentists are contacted in order to rpt statements of need of 
personnel for the variety of occupations involved* 

Under the M»»*T*A. programs several joint meetings with the Division 
of employment Security have bean conducted to explore needs in the health 
fields* 

The nursing hems owners, hospital adninistrators, members of the 
Physical Therapy Association have all conferred with supervisors in the 
Vocational Mvision during the year. 

The functions of the area and local advisory committees continue 
to be of assistance in public relations, recruitment of students, and 
expansion of programs* 

There is a considerable amount of individual counseling offered to 
prospective candidates for these programs either in personal interviews or 
conversations* 



Pro-Tans in the major cities are attempting to expand to meet the 
of the localities* In Boston, Worcester, and Springfield, the 
Practical Horsing Proprams have become centralized and use as many hospital 
agencies for the clinical experience as necessary* 

Zn the Springfield and Worcester areas, the facilities of hospitals 
which are not actually located in these cities have been used most effectively* 
The use of some of the smaller clinical facilities has proven successful 
in terms of the results of the graduates taking the State Board Examinations* 



In the mere isolated areas, programs remain small, but have presided 
an adequate supply of licensed practical nurses for the areas they serve* 

In the past four years there has bean increasing emphasis on training 
for Health Occupations other than practical nursing* The needs of the 
hospitals and nursing homes are being analysed more successfully and hospital 
administrators are becoming acquainted with the ability of Vocational Educators 
to supply training p ro g r ams for these courses* 



%m 



2xar.iales o,? the ^ 3 are additional sMsst Issli merits |M|NH MM Ml| 
planned, additional Radical Laboratory Assistant Programs, enlargement of 
training programs for Operating Boom Assistants, liwflsawmtlng additional 
Physical Thereof Assistants Programs, and the contemplation of training for 
Occupational Therapy Assistants, Inhalational -therapy Assistants, and 
Radiology Therapy Assistants, 

The major adjustment to new legislation has been the involvement 
of Health Occupations Training under the new M*D.T*A # programs* The philosophy 
and practice of the Division of Vocational f&noation has been to maintain 
the same standards for additional sections in practical nursing training 
being organised under the H # D«T*A» program as these that have been set up 
for the already established on-going practical nurse program* 

It is the opinion of the Supervisors that any legislation which deals 
with problems relating to health and self are of the community will affect 
the training programs in health occupations, because of the recent social 
legislation, medicare, the needs of the ooBsannities for trained personnel 
in health occupations sill be more than doubled* As increased care is offered 
to geriatric patients, psychiatric patients, and to retarded children, it 
will be necessary for the training for health occupations to continue to 



r 



■ 






290 



DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

The Annual Vocational Summer School Conference was conducted from 
June 28 thru July 2, 1965. In attendance were 20 Teacher Coordinators of 
Distributive Education and 8 new Distributive Education teachers enrolled 
in the Teacher-Training Program at the college. This year a great deal of 
tine was spent on the DECA Program as our State is to be the "Host State" 
at the North Atlantic Regional Conference in Boston in October, 1965* 
Present at the conference were: 

Ifr. Harry Applegate, Program Director - Washington, D.C. 

Mr. William Hailes, New York State Supervisor, Distributive Education 

Mr. Alvo E. Albini, Educational Service itenager - Montgomery Ward and 

Company, Chicago 
Mr. Ronney Bishop, National President, DECA - Texas 
Mr. Chester Young, Sales and Marketing Club of Boston 

A re-evaluation of all the contests for the State DECA Convention was 
accomplished. Other areas explained during the week was the new preparatory 
program as made available through new Legislation - Public Law 88-210. The 
new Quincy program was explained. Our Distributive Program will start in 
grades 10 thru 12. Marketing surveys and research projects accomplished 
during the year by several of the Distributive Education teachers were 
reviewed. An executive of the Sales and Marketing groups of Boston attended 
one day of the conference and encouraged the Teachers to participate in these 
Marketing surveys to a greater extent. 

State Supervisor attended and participated in the North Atlantic Regional 
Conference of DECA in New York City; was Chairman of a panel on Distributive 
Education at the Eastern Business Teachers Association Convention held at 
Hotel Statler, Boston; attended Director's Conference in Auburn, Massachusetts, 
was speaker on three panels ; attended the Federal Conference held in Boston 
on the new Vocational Act of 1963; in Washington, D.C* - represented the North 
Atlantic Region on the Policy and Planning Committee of the A.V.A. and was 
elected Secretary of this group; held the State DECA Convention in Boston 
during March and took the winners in the State Contests to the National 
Leadership Conference in Chicago which was held in May. Fifty students parti- 
cipated. 

foe of our Post-secondary Distributive Education students was elected 
Vice President of the North Atlantic Region of DECA while at Chicago; attended 
and participated in Conference held in the University of Massachusetts for the 
new Teacher-Training Program for Distributive Education teachers in the New 
Englan d area to be started next year at Amherst; attended Boston Conference 
on Distribution; Boston Retail Trade Board luncheon given in recognition of all 
the Boston ISerchandising students; attended a luncheon given by Sales and 
Marketing Executives of Boston to honor the winners of the Marketing Projects 
at the State Conference; attended the National Retail Dry Goods Association 
Convention in New York in January. 






'4ii I 



Audio-visual aids were made available through the services of the State 
Department of Education, Visual Aids Department* The State library facilities 
made available up-to-date text books on Marketing* Small Business Administration 
was most helpful to the State Supervisor in sending up-to-date informational 
bulletins j manuals on marketing, and for securing some very fine speakers for 
our Adult Programs* The State Department of Commerce sends a monthly journal 
on Business Forecasts for Massachusetts and lists of statistical reports on 
employment trends* The Boston Chamber of Commerce and other local Chambers of 
Commerce have been most helpful in promoting and sponsoring Adult Distributive 
Education Programs* The State Association of Guidance Personnel have extended 
to the State Supervisor invitations to attend important Guidance meetings 
throughout the year and at one meeting the State Supervisor explained the 
Distributive Education Program* State Supervisor assisted on two committees 
in the evaluation of two large high schools in the State* Certification of 
prospective Distributive Education teachers is important duty of State 
Supervisor* 

A study has been made of the need for additional Teacher-Training programs 
for all the New England States* A group of Distributive Education Teacher- 
Trainers from other states were assembled at the University of Massachusetts* 
A program was developed and a project proposal, for a pilot program* was 
submitted to the B50E, under the provisions of P.L. 88-210, Section liC, to 
provide funds for the project. This project involves not only pre-employment 
preparation* but also for graduate study for upgrading and advanced degrees* 

Twenty-six (26) cooperative secondary programs are in operation in the 
State of Massachusetts with eleven (11) preparatory programs* 

There is only one post-secondary Distributive Education program in the 
State at Essex County Agricultural and Technical Institute* Twenty-three (23) 
young men enrolled in this program last Fall* As this is a program in mid- 
management training the candidates for the program are carefully screened, and 
as a result the program was well received by both the students and the merchants* 
The weekly rate earned by these young men varies from $1*50 per hour to 
$2*^5 per hour* The Food Industry is adequately serviced by these young men* 
Total earnings for this class this past year amounted to $1*8,039*32. 

During the past year our Distributive Education teacher coordinator at 
the Essex County Agricultural and Technical Institute organised and conducted 
22 Adult Evening Courses; over 2000 people received training through these 
courses* 

Other areas serviced by our Distributive Education division in the 
Adult Field were - Jtyannis, Saugus, Fall River, Maiden, Natick, Springfield, 
Boston, l0well, Peabody, Salem, Danvers, Beverly, Revere, and Worcester* 
The State Supervisor cooperated with the Zayre Corporation in setting up a 
Mid-Management Training program in six (6) cities where their stores are 
located. Approximately 180 people received this training. Much more could 
be accomplished in the Adult area of training with additional help given to 
the State Supervisor* 



( 




At the Summer School this year a review of our Distributive Education 
curriculum was made* Many changes in our curriculum have been suggested, as 
a result of the new lav affecting Vocational Education "88-210" • Example * 
Preparatory Programs extending offerings in Grades 10-12. Project Method of 
teaching Distributive Education was explored* Programs to help more people 
in our field to become employed by offering more adult programs in Marketing* 

At Hanover High School in Hanover, Massachusetts a Distributive Education 
Program will be established in September, 196$, This will be a cooperative 
program on 12th grade level to start* Next year we shall expand this program 
and have an Uth grade preparatory program at this high school* 

A new Distributive Education Program will start at Winthrop High School 
this Fall, 1965* It will be a cooperative program for 12th grade students 
only* We shall expand this into a preparatory program, 11th grade by Fall, 1966, 

Another new Distributive Education Program will open at Dartmouth High 
School in September, 1°6£* Twenty-five (25>) students have enrolled in the 
program* This is a cooperative program on 12th grade level to start* 

the Sixth Annual State DECA Convention was held this year on March 2k, 196f> 
at Hotel Statler in Boston* Six hundred (600) DECA students attended this 
Convention* Forty-two (U2) merchants attended and served as Judges in the 
fourteen (Hi) contests that took place that day* In attendance also were the 
Assistant Commissioner of Education, the Director and Assistant Director of 
Vocational Education, Superintendent of Boston Public Schools and many High 
School principals and Vocational Directors throughout the State* The Governor 
of our State signed a Proclamation setting aside the week of March 2k as DECA 
week - much publicity was given to this Convention* Each year DECA is growing 
in sise and strength* 

Election of the new DECA State Officers took place; awards were presented 
to winners of the many contests* The DECA Alumni group were most helpful and 
the State Club Advisors and the Supervisor of Distributive Education* The 
State Supervisor was presented a very lovely bronze plaque by the DBCA Alumni 
in recognition of the work accomplished with the DECA Organisation* Membership 
in DECA for next year is anticipated to reach 750 or more with three (3) new 
programs opening in the Fall* 

The North Atlantic Kegional State Officers 1 Conference was held in New 
Tork City from November 5-7. Our DECA State Officers attended and participated 
in the work-shops. Our State President from Fitchburg represented Massachusetts 
and sat at the Head Table. The Assistant Commissioner of Education was the 
guest speaker at the Saturday evening banquet. Plans were made at this Regional 
Conference in November for the DECA State Officers to support candidates for the 
National Officers of DECA at the Chicago Convention in the Spring. 

In October 1965 - our State will be the host State for the Regional State 
Officers* Conference in Boston. 






^k3kj:- 



National leadership Conference of DECA took place in Chicago in April 29 - 
May 1. The Massachusetts delegation numbered approximately fifty (f>0) students . 
The winners in the State Competition are eligible to attend the National 
Conference* Several recognitions and awards were received at the National 
Conference in Chicago. The best Marketing Survey done by our Post High School 
Class won third prise; our Post-high School student was elected Vice President 
of the North Atlantic Region for DECA. He will attend the Leadership Conference 
in Washington, D*C. in August, with all expenses paid by the National DECA, This 
honor received by a member of our DECA Organisation was publicised throughout 
the State and North Atlantic Region* This is a wonderful experience for these 
young people to attend a National Convention which numbered over 2000 students 
from every State in the Union* Oar Massachusetts State flag was carried by our 
DECA State President from Saugus to the Rostrum at the Head Table preceding the 
banquet Saturday night. Every State flag was presented at this occasion with 
Massachusetts flying her colors highj 

A Summer School Teacher-Training Program is organised every year during 
the last week in June and the first week in July for all new Distributive 
Education teachers who have received certification to teach a Vocational 
Distributive Education Program* This year eleven (U) teachers were enrolled 
in this Teacher-Training Program* The required 60 hours of Teacher-Training 
was earned by all of these new teachers* A 30 hour Professional Improvement 
Course was seen at Fitohburg for our regularly employed Distributive Education 
teachers at the Summer School* Fifteen (15) teacher-coordinators were enrolled 
in this program* This Teacher-Training Program is conducted by the State 
Supervisor of Distributive Education each year* Four new Distributive Education 
teachers have been placed in our new programs at Dartmouth, Winthrop, Hanover, 
and a replacement in Waltham. 

This will be accomplished at the University of Massachusetts when our 
new Teacher-Training Program opens in Fall of 1966. Teachers preparing to 
teach Distributive Education programs will enroll in this program at Amherst 
and will fulfill our State requirements for Certification for all Distributive 
Education teachers* Also at the University of Massachusetts under the Dean of 
Education where our new program will be operating, there will be sufficient time 
and personnel to work a Curriculum revision. At present this is impossible at 
the State level due to lack of personnel* 

At present there is no provision for Teacher-Training for our Adult Programs. 
We employ our regular Day cooperative teachers in many instances, otherwise, 
we use businessmen from toe trade - with some or very little Teacher-Training* 
This is very poor, but facilities for training teachers for Adult Classes is 
impossible due to lack of time on the part of the State Supervisor to do this 
training. We definitely need a Supervisor in our State office to handle the 
Adult Program alone. 

Follow-up studies of new graduates are made each year to determine the 
number who have stayed in the field of distribution and marketing, also to 
determine the advancement of our graduates on the job. We find that many 
of our girls marry after high school and do not remain in the field, but do 
return to retailing after their families are grown up. Many of the young men 
join the service of their country. While others are employed in the field or 
else in related areas of marketing* 



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A pilot program Is starting in Quincy High School next Fall* extending 
the Distributive Education program to start in the 10th grade* Students in 
the Business Education Department will elect a course in marketing for one 
period a day along with other Business subjects* In the 11th grade the 
students, who wish, will follow the Distributive Education program and elect 
Marketing II (one period a day will be devoted to a further study of marketing)* 
This along with the required business subjects* This is a Preparatory Program 
for Grade 12* 

In grade 12 we plan to have two Distributive Education classes* one will 
be cooperative and the other non-cooperative* 

Twice a year in January and June the State Supervisor makes a survey of 
the placements of the Distributive Education students* In the survey the hours 
the student works* the type of work he or she does and wages earned is recorded* 
7ery few dropouts are noted* Earnings of our students are most gratifying and 
encouraging. Our enrollment this year numbered 800* Total earnings approximately 
$^00,000. 

It the Post-Secondary Distributive Education Program at Essex County 
Agricultural and Technical Institute, our Marketing instructor has often worked 
with the Agricultural teachers in preparing outlines especially, as the program 
relates in part to food distribution - example, grading of eggs, milk, etc*; 
also pure foods laws, U.S. Government labelling on meats, etc* Many times the 
Agricultural instructor takes over the class especially as it applies to food, 
as he is an expert* Also our Distributive Education instructor works closely 
with the instructor of floral design especially, as they pertain to Adult Programs 
in the marketing of flowers* 



Oir Distributive Education teacher coordinators often work with the 
Economics Departments in the high school especially in reference to Fashion 
Shows that Distributive Education and Home Economics put on together in school 
auditoriums* 

Work closely with Employment Security offices in placing our students in 
jobs, especially at Christmas time. Our Adult Pre-Christmas Training classes 
were placed on jobs by Employment Security office last year* 1000 persons 
were trained and placed on Christmas jobs. 

State Supervisor worked closely with the Sales & Marketing Executive 
Club of Boston especially DEGA marketing projects* Our teacher coordinators 
who entered contests in marketing received valuable assistance from this group* 

Advisory Committees - The Advisory Committees for Distributive Education 
in many localities are most active and have worked closely with our Distributive 
Education teacher coordinators this past year* The State Supervisor attended 
several Advisory Committee meetings during the year also, attended three 
Employer-aaployes Banquets at close of school year* I considered this good 
public relations* 



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'<&5 



There is no State Advisory Committee for D.E. in Massachusetts at the 
present time, although the State Supervisor has asked to have one established. 
Advisory Committees in local areas are most inactive and do very little for 
D.E. as such. Their names appear on the State forms and that is all there is 
to it. The State Supervisor has tried to correct this situation through 
conferences with Teachei Coordinators. 

The DECA State President had his picture taken at the Executive Chamber 
of the State Capitol with Governor Volpe signing the "DECA H Declaration, 
This picture with a write-up on the Conference appeared in the Boston and 
Greater Boston newspapers. A very excellent Television appearance was made 
the night before the State Conference by one of our Distributive Education 
teacher coordinators with her Distributive Education students explaining 
what "DECA Means to Me." 

The State Supervisor appeared over a television station in Boston at 
noon- time to explain the D.E. Program; radio appearances were made during 
the year to also explain the Distributive Education program - especially 
telling the public about the many and varied Adult Training Programs that 
are available through our Division of Vocational Education. 

A Distributive Education booth showing Distributive Education classroom 
set-up, Distributive Education projects and informative materials on Distributive 
Education and photographs were arranged at the new Prudential Center in Boston 
for two days during Education Week. This was done in cooperation with the 
Director of Distributive Education in Boston and the State Supervisor of Dis- 
tributive Education. 

Programs are being offered to out-of-school youth, dropouts, and unem- 
ployed persons through our services. At Christmas time last year, approximately 
1000 people were trained and placed in the North Shore Shopping area by our 
Distributive Education teacher coordinator. In cooperation with the Department 
of Employment Security, the services and placements of these trainees were 
accomplished. Ihis was an economical help to both the trainees and the retail 
stores. 

The new legislation in Vocational Education will greatly enhance our 
Distributive Education program through added funds to improve our facilities 
for training and to expand the offerings of our services. Already the State 
Supervisor is receiving requests for new Distributive Education programs in 
areas which at one time did not feel the need for this training. Ihe expansion 
of Shopping Centers, increased population especially in the youth bracket has 
had a great effect on this type of program. 






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ay« 



OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE 



A graduate credit course in Vocational Training and Placement at 
Fitchburg State College from June 28 to July 9* was attended by twenty- 
five (2£) Counselors and Directors of Guidance. 

A conference was held with consultants from local universities, 
i.e., Tufts and Harvard, as well as a School Superintendent, Directors 
of Guidance, and Supervisors from the Division of Employment Security 
discuss current problems. 

The State Supervisor lectured on Vocational Education to the graduate 
students of the Harvard University Center for Field Studies and held 
individual conferences with different students of the Center explaining 
regional vocational and technical schools. 

The State Supervisor assisted in the development of a program 
"Suggested Guidance Schedules'*, which was completed by guidance personnel 
in communities reimbursed for guidance services who sent youth to 
State-aided Vocational Schools. 

The State Supervisor planned and organized Counselor Training courses 
which were presented in conjunction with the Annual Summer School 
Conferences conducted at Fitchburg State College. 

The State Supervisor prepared surveys with District Planning 
Committees and Superintendents of Schools in the preliminary plans 
for the establishment of regional vocational-technical schools. These 
plans were the result of a survey conducted by the Division of Vocational 
Education for the purpose of determining the anticipated enrollment and the 
training to be offered for placement in occupations in the region. 

Because of inadequate State staffing, there are twelve (12) requests 
for regional vocational and technical school surveys waiting for the 
Vocational Division to present recommendations of the need for vocational 
education in the respective areas and the intensity of the need. Some of 
these surveys will indicate that present, inadequate vocational schools 
should be closed and the towns combine with other committees to present 
vocational programs in modern facilities. 



297 






AHHUAL REPORT 

Division of Research and Statistics 

Year Ending Juno 30, 1965 

INTRODUCTION 

The 1965 Annual Report of the Division of Research and Statistics 
is a rather historical document. With this report , the Division v under 
its present name, will end its existence* The life span of this 
Division has been marked with a number of noteworthy achievements. 

Classified as a service arm of the Department , Research and Statis- 
tics has had as its goal the gathering and reporting of data significant 
to the operation and planning of the educational system at the local, 
state, and federal levels. 

In recent years, pressure from our federal partner has increased 
the collection of information from the local system to the point where 
it became necessary for the state to alleviate the situation. Conse- 
quently, our efforts have been concentrated on examining surveys in 
order thst we might eliminate duplication. By instituting a new finan- 
cial accounting system, we have been able to standardise the reporting 
of data, both to the state and Washington. 

A number of additional challenges have been met and overcome during 
this period and we will go Into greater detail on these in the following 
pages. 



> 






«98 



RESEARCH UNIT 

Research activity under Division sponsorship increased tremendously 
during the past year* A number of local school systems were aided in 
the preparation of proposals for financial grants under the provisions 
of the Cooperative Research Act as administered by the U.S. Office of 
Education. 

Communities submitting projects included! 

Springfield 

West Springfield 

Bedford 

Billerica 

Mount Greyleck Regional 

Quincy 

In addition v the Division furnished valuable assistance in the pre- 
paration of a successful research proposal for a series of television 
lectures on Civil Rights. Funds for this project were obtained under 
Title IV of the Civil Rights Act. 

Liaison with the Harvard Research and Development Center was main- 
tained by the Division. The Division assisted the Center In locating a 
school system willing to assist in the development of a research project. 

Panels on research were conducted at the spring conferences of 
superintendents and high school principals at Bridgewater and Framingham, 
respectively. 

At the present time, the Division is establishing a panel of educa- 
tors interested in reading research proposals. A technique now employed 
by the U.S. Office of Education, it is expected that this group will be 
able to assist those preparing project proposals through constructive 
criticism before the proposals are forwarded to Washington* 

As this year is ending, the Division is busy preparing plans for 
expansion and reorganization under the provisions of Title V of Public 
Law 89-10, the Elementary and Secondary Act of 1965 t and the recommenda- 
tions of Chapter 572 of the Acts of 1965, the so-called Willis-Harrington 
Bill. 

STATISTICAL UNIT 

The most significant achievement In the area of statistics this 
past year was the gathering, for the first time, of data in significant 
depth on the teachers in every school system in Massachusetts* Attempts 
have been made in the past to collect this information but the data 
gathered have been far from complete. 

Acting in response to a request for this information from the United 
States Office of Education In Washington, division staff members traveled 
from Provincetown to North Adams to either collect or correct this 



( 






f£>\J\J 



information on staff personnel* Haaaachusetts will aand this information 
to Washington this summer as part of a nation-wide study on teaching 
personnel. Studies in depth will be conducted on a national level to 
determine shortages im& overages on various disciplines in order to fur* 
nlsh Congress with answers necessary for the members to have In max in- 
decisions involving federal financial support progress* 

It Is also expected that the Division will be able to sake studies 
of Massachusetts personnel during the coding year from the data gathered* 

Continuing the updating of the statistical section of the Annual Re- 
port* Part II, for the first tine, this report was sent to superintendents 
of schools in the fall of 1964* Only financial data was asked for in 
June, 1985, together with a few end-of-year pupil statistics* This pro- 
cedure has enabled the Division to check the dsta such earlier and to 
reply to requests for information fros the United States Office of Educa- 
tion at a such earlier dat • 

A new format for the Annual Report of the Department of Education, 
Part II, was adopted* This was deemed necessary because of tho change 
in reporting procedures brought about with the installation of a new 
financial accounting system. This system was instituted by the Division 
during the past year for local school systems throughout the Commonwealth, 

As with any new system, unforeseen obstacles were met and overcome 
but not without delay In arriving at the final production date* 

Huch time and effort was spent by Division personnel furnishing 
statistics to various agencies of state government as a solution is being 
sought to the problem of insufficient state financial assistance to 
cities and towns* 

In addition, because of the updating of equalised valuation data 
from 19H5 to 1953 1 the major reimbursement program, Chapter 70 1 must be 
computed two different ways for the school year 196H-65. forms to pro- 
vide for this unusual situation have been developed by the Division for 
local school systems after many hours of preparation* 

Transportation audits were conducted in cities and towns during the 
past year* This type of field service assistance has only served to 
point up the need for additional staff to service school systems in all 
areas of accounting— pupil, staff, property, and program, in addition to 
financial accounting* 

A total of 16 workshops in financial accounting were held this past 
spring by Frank Livak and Leo Turo of the Division staff* Some 420 
local school personnel attended these workshops staged to give local 
school systems assistance in preparing the Second Annual Financial Report 
under the new accounting syatem* 

In addition, Division accountants have assisted local school systems 
J in the preparation of Public Law *7a reports and have appeared as 

panelists at the annual meeting of the !!unicipal Accountants 1 and Town 



300 



Auditors* Association, For the 7th year, the Division has co-sponsored, 
with tha Massachusetts School Sacratarias 1 Association, the annual fall 
conference at the University of Massachusetts. Strictly a working con- 
ference, a number of workshops were held with emphasis being placed on 
the proper interpretation of the many programs and accompanying forms 
issued and supervised by the Massachusetts Department of Education* 

DATA PR0CS5SIHG UHIT 

The first annual meeting of the Massachusetts Educational Data Pro- 
cessing Association was held at the &oute 128 Hotel, Dodham, during 1965, 
More than 270 members and guests participated, representing the majority 
of school systems in the Commonwealth, Dr, Stanley Smith of the United 
States Office of Education was the featured speaker* Dr, John Magee was 
installed as the organisations first president. This association Is 
sponsored by this Division* 

The second data processing pilot project conducted by the Division 
in cooperation with a local school system was developed with the Weymouth 
School Department* The equipment was furnished to Weymouth for one year* 
In return, Weymouth agreed to display and demonstrate the utilisation of 
the machines to interested school personnel en the South Shore of Massa- 
chuaetts* 

A pilot program in pupil attendance accounting was initiated in the 
Lynn schools as forerunner to eventual programming of pupil attendance 
for all the school children in that Worth Shore City* 

Courses in data processing for school administrators were conducted 
at the State Colleges in Worcester, Fraralngham, Westfield, and Boston, 
by Division personnel and others, using course material developed by the 
Division, Sr* John Torosian and Dr* John Magee of the Division staff 
were among those instructing in this area* 

A publication, '•Computer Student Scheduling" was published fay the 
Division and has been read with great interest by high school principals* 

Machines in the data processing center are continuing to operate at 
peak capacity* The work load is steadily increasing* Mew program* are 
being developed constantly with accompanying demands on machinery* The 
equipment now being utilised must be augmented and the staff increased, 
particularly in the area of programming* 

PUBLIC IHFORKATIOH SECTION 

"" «' " III II I II H III I nu ll I I ■ 

Fiscal "65" has again seen this unit of the Division more ahead on 
several fronts* In the publishing area, the Department has been able to 
rely heavily on this section to handle a greater volume of work* This 
has resulted in considerable savings of both monies and time* Previous 
experience with material printed outside of the Department shoved that 
at least two and possibly four months elapsed from the point of initial 
requisition to a finished copy. The main hold-up here rested with an 
already over-burdened central printing office* 



301 



Earlier in the report mention was made of a publication entitled, 
"Computer Student Scheduling. H The responca that this book produced la 
but typical of the attention several Division publications received in 
the area of Educational Data Processing. 

Although thia past year saw a great deal of energy expended in data 
processing, the Division did not reduce its annual flow of data on such 
subjects est per pupil costs , local salary ranges 9 teacher shortages, 
pupil projections t federally impacted areas, etc* With the increase in 
reports it has become quite evident that new and larger equipment will 
be needed to operate an in-plant production unit that will satisfy De- 
partment needs. It must be kept in mind, however , that even with such 
equipment, inexperienced and unqualified personnel will not be able to 
do the job. Therefore, the salary structure of a number of existing 
positions must be reviewed in order that an optimum effort be achieved. 

In the Public Information area, despite shortages of personnel, 
inquiries were handled with care *nd dispatch, from the number of re- 
quests for data and the varied sources of these requests, it is evident 
that the interest in education is growing at a tremendous pace. 

Unfortunately, understaffed as we are, it is almost impossible to 
Initiate information programs on our own. For the time being, although 
vital to the continued progress of education, such programs must remain 
on the calendar of "things to do.** 

The Division was privileged to be host for the spring meeting of 
the Northeast Council for Educational Research and Statistics (NESCEKS). 
This conference was held at the Civil Defense Academy in Topsfield. 
Representatives present from the United States Office of Education in- 
cluded? Dr. Alexander M. Hood, Assistant Commissioner in charge of 
Statistical Programs $ Dr. Stanley Smith, and Hurray Pfefferman. Also 
In attendance were representatives from the states of Maine, Hew Hamp- 
shire, Vermont, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Sew York, Pennsylvania, 
Maryland, Hew Jersey, and Delaware. 

Problems involving the transmission of data from the states to the 
U.S. Office and return were discussed. 

Dr. John Torosian of the Division staff presented a paper at the 
Miami Convention of the Association of Educational Data Systems. 

frank Livak attended the National Education Association's national 
conference on school finance in Chicago. 

Glenn Myers, who recently successfully passed the Data Processing 
Management Association examinations, wa*< able to attend the national 
conference of this group held in June, n Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 



3U« 



PERSOHMEI. 

wmmmnhmHm 

John lorosian, Principal of Pcntucket Regional Hifh School, West 
itewbury, Hassacnueetts, joined the staff of the division on October 1 9 
lii6«*. As the first specialist in research to be assigned to the 
Division, Or* Toroslan brings with him an extensive background In this 
area , acquired waile completing doctoral requirement a at Columbia Uni- 
versity* 

Dr* Toroslan has been assigned responsibility for the area of 
staff accounting as well as research. Through his efforts, the first 
complete staff survey for Massachusetts was accomplished* 

Dp* Toroslan has worked with local schools developing project re- 
quests under Cooperative Research and has been the Division liaison 
with the Harvard Research and Development Center* 

In addition, the new staff member has had extensive experience 
with unit record equipment and computers in the area of educational 
data processing* 

In January, 1965, Or* John Magce, Senior Supervisor, resigned his 
position to enter private business as an educational consultant* This 
departing left the Division without a specialist in data processing in 
the area of pupil accounting* While seeking a replacement, his duties 
have been shared by Dr. Toroslan and Mr* Frank Livak* 

£ltou tfunson, one of the three Division transportation auditors, 
passed away suddenly at Hyancis while on a field audit with other staff 
members of the Division* 

Joseph Tannacci cane to the hi vis ion as a replacement for Mr* Hun- 
son, and Frank Davis was named to replace Richard Carlson who was 
transferred to the Business Office* 






TITLE X AdVXSOKf COMHXTTCE 

' ■ » » ■ 1 I HI ' l ll 11 l» ■ ii 111 I II! 11 ■ I l 



For the past three years, a statewide advisory committee to the 
Division to aid in the improvement of data gathering has been named by 
the Board of Education. These members are! 



Hiss Ruth Crowley 
President, Massachusetts School 
Secretaries* Association 

Mr* Henry Oerouin 
Director, Data Processing 
Qanvers Public Schools 

Hr. Richard Fogarty, President 
Massachusetts Association of 
School Business Officials 



Mr. $alph Pino, President 
Massachusetts School Attendance 
Supervisors' Association 

Dr* Thomas L* Xlvard 
Superintendent of Schools 
Chelmsford Public Schools 

Mr* Robert X* Ryan, President 
Massachusetts Junior High School 
Principals* Association 



-:iiK$ 



Or* Henry L. Isaksen 
Assistant Superintendent 
Lexington Public Schools 

Mr, Gerald F. Lambert 
Coordinator, Federally Aided 

Educational Programs 
Hassachusstts Dapartnsnt of 

Education 

Mr. John P. HcGrail, Director 
Division of Tsachsr Certification 

and Placement 
Hassachusstts dapartnsnt of 

Education 

Mr. Anthony R. Huseeute 
Supsrintsndsnt of Schools 
Easthaopton Public Schools 



Mr. Arthur H. Smith, President 
Massachusetts Secondary School 
Principals' Association 

Dr. Arthur Sullivan 

Assistant Supsrintsndsnt of Schools 

Worcester Public Schools 

Dr. Everett 0. Thistle, Director 
Division of Elementary and 

Secondary Education 
Massachusetts Department of Education 

Mr. Raymond S. Dower, Jr., Director 
Division of Research and Statistics 
Massachusetts Department of Education 

Mr. William Curley 

School Building Assistance Commission 



This committee has boon meeting in subcommittee groups of various 
areas of interest and responsibility. A member of the Division's super- 
visory staff has acted bm coordinator for each sub-group. Dr. Torosian 
has been with the Staff Accounting Subcommittee consisting oft Mr. John 
P. McGrail, Dr. Everett C. Thistle, Dr. Arthur Sullivan, Mr. Arthur Smith, 
and Mr. Robert Ryan* 

Dr. John Magee has worked with the Pupil Accounting group consisting 
of i Mr. Henry Derouin, Mr. Ralph Pino, Hiss Ruth Crowley, and Dr. Henry 
Isaksen. 

Prank Livak and Leo Ture have been assisting the Property Accounting 
Subcommittee consisting of the following members I Mr. Richard Fogarty, 
Mr, Anthony Musesnte, Mr. Gerald F. Lambert, Dr. Thomas L. Rivsrd, and 
Mr. William Curlsy. 

The aim of all of these groups is to develop manuals in the areas of 
their responsibility for future publication. These manuals, after exten- 
sive pilot program testing, would eventually take their place in each 
superintendent's office as reference material to aid the local school 
administrator in ths proper lnterpretstlon and reporting of school data. 

RJECOMMDfOATIOMS 

This Division has the same needs as the other Divisions now housed 
at 200 Newbury Street \ namely, more staff and more apace within which to 
work. In addition, access to a computer facility is an absolute must. 
The Division now has ths personnel who are knowledgeable with various 
types of computer programs and has more than H programs now on computer 
tape. Unfortunately, the Division must borrow and beg time where v." and 
whenever it can obtain access. This has resulted in all kinds of delays 
for the processing of ths Annual Report, Part II. As of this writlng t 
this report is not complete because Mr. Myers of the Division staff can 



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304 



have access to the Department of Public Works IBM 1H01 only two hour* a 
week to run his progress. This condition will continue until the De- 
portment has its own facility* With the addition of more and wore 
Federally associated programs, with their accompanying reports , more 
statistical studies in depth are requested in order to determine the 
worth of these progress. The Division cannot hope to meet the demands 
of other divisions demanding this type of service without the proper 
sophisticated equipment at the computer level* 

An optical scoring machine ordinarily utilised for test scoring 
would be cf great assistance to the Division* This machine could be 
utilised in reading answers to surveys and totalling results much 
faster than would be possible to keypunch the same data* 

While professional staff has increased, the secretarial staff has 
not* At present , there is a log* jam created by professionals preparing 
copy on their own area of responsibility , but having to wait for typed 
copy because of only three secretaries in the Division* 

Requests have been included in budget recommendations for additional 
secretarial assistance f as well as field service personnel* The latter, 
as mentioned earlier in this report , are needed to be of service to local 
school systems in the preparation of forms and reports engendered by the 
increasing number of program* initiated at Federal and State level* 






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A3BKSAL 9M9&& 



a* * OOP "P* ■• ^B|wJPejpea ae^BOF*PiPraPa^ai^^eewJw ^W wJ^W^w^w ^^^wJ^w VWvS ^^^^P*w« w^ WV^P w*^ej|^^W|^Pw l^h ePw^^W -^w> a^ a#P*a 

fonda contributed voluntarily fcy public, private end ©erocAiai 

o^^e*ww^e^ip<e» *jp^b ep^n^owpaew' eaopPjwP^»wawPPjp apaa j|P*ae*aawjwa>a»'jjp^P4ap^pFpj aa^ee - vMpaHNw^Pv^v> wa^pow 

3(po* wPje*o ^w^^PwP w^aa <•* ppap ^aaaBiwwp^^w^p ^w ^p»w^^b* " "w*pa^*w a*(*w^Pw^p^p ai^a^w ^» ^^w^^wa a^ a jpj^^f^^f^t 

eeeintf the entire operation la the ttt»ff i r i twiaat t > Sxecutive 

aiPwawaew^e a* a«wp •wwaie e^eie^as^p^^p awpp^^^^eawj^b (►^w w*aa ™ aw ^ai^a^ee *■'•• wp^w *p w^w^ ••^w ■%"*■• •w^ep* %> *4 *a* a* »» ™ 

of tha Acta of 1M0* *he production and broadceat of theee 
prograaa i# co a due ted through tha facilities af Boston' a 

wPwsaeai^wa w#^a#wa ^a aiea* ^a><e^pnpe • "aw© <e ▼ a* ^wA^^vwMwwa w* a 



In itovastoer of 19*4* ttr. Alan Stenhaneen* director of fjBS 21 
1VCB CXMSROQN, resigned to accept a position aa Director af 
educational services for mm ia Cleveland, Ohio, Serving 

aa Aetinc Director ess lira* Loaiea fire an Mrtihtimtw i who was 

"■Ww^ w»^w ^^»»^^ *w" ^■mw- www* W^wp "ww w™^# w w lww r ^»*w*w WW- w^wffwJF' v ww^pwwwwww*wj w» qt ^"•flr*w/ " P ^W 

appointed tha year before aa Assistant director. Kiss FnyXUs 

w^^f ^^^Bf ^^^^ p^^^ppw ^w^w^eaee ^va^wfly- ww a^Pa ^wpn^ ee a w^aaiaaa^^pa^w awaa>''e e^^e*^papw^w^^'^^wjfr w^w* 

1*64. A new director will ha appointed Bering tha SwMer* 
since lira. WcWaaara is resigning ia July. 

^^tf w*^^ ^w^ ^^^^^MrJFA ^^^w* ^^aajaa^jp^aawaa^^ a^ae^^ae^ a^wa w 'e , ^aaa'wS*a^^^nwp aPTPP^aaaie w^^ wwrwa jawia^paj 

dent of the aasdhSw Public Schools* was e l ected to serve for 

™s* wF^p*spm^Www* ev# 'W 1 e^ow v^ae* nasase* "a laHi ♦UwPwaWwi'ee sp w> w ^9 seap^^wSWwS* a* sp^P^p) £ *awWw*wlPaB 

with «r. William young. Superintendent of Brainfcn&e, aha also 

*^a^ wF^a*a a ^ea^p -ayapap as v^wF^awPavaiA w»w5a» aw eWwJP w •w^w^wf#a>eta «aww» a s^Piajevesoa^ejPESjway 

«r. f^Fwoariwk »obina»n<. director of the ^riagf laid riaa arte 
2toeao», abo raei^iatS in wOvawhar« i* Mr* Jtohart J. aiefiartaay. 
NT. MeCartsiay ia Saeratary of the wHivajraity of llaaaao^tiawttat 
Aaheret, ltoSwa<deje*t*e* ta ApriX f Dr. Aabert ftuaeeU, Suaerin* 
taaoaot of the towjmm&w Vohlic w^iooXa* aaa aaaoiataw by 
the woard of tdto o a t i oa to earn* on tfc* Exacativa w3w*tttee t*» 
aXaoiag Mr. John &* flt«patri^ 9 ^j^wriataaoami of the Ciioopee 
wflhoola* Othar a aah e r s of tha Ooaalttaa are John »« Chaffee* 
Superiateoaeat of wallaalayi aitl I* taaaaaoaii# Hamhwietar of 



. 






t&a faaaandon sdttool* Hawtont Mm* aarria, aataao* of Soiaaieo; 
afoeme* gawlat*, Sacratary of Aaharat Call*?** Mooaioiao* Albert 
l&a $ Arehdiocaaa of Soatottt tfilliaaj 4. e*taoliHpha»» Aaalafcaat 
attiwintaodant of ftoaton* Pr* thornm J. Curtia, &aa*ity 
Coawrtaaloaor of Bdttofttloar ood «k>*rdw* smmi # Hilton &c3»ooi 
£2&aaaittaa . 






I*at wiotar tha ftaasaeHuaotta gxocutiva CoaaUttoa, raalistn? 
ta# aoad for 41 ^rou|> to aturty en-3 avsaiuat* a ati a t t nq; eoarioa «s»& 

to noko roi unaaaniilit Innn goqard loo fmaw a iiinun iwi i for— d a 
yrograaaUna Adviaory coawdtt*© wit* ranwaanatativaa fvaaj tho 
aiaafrar achooi ©yatow** WfiHa*, raiwaraltio** audi tfta &af*rta*mt 
Ml RjtaNfctoloft* OaaaM&toa asaHuXMra ?»r# 110 follows c &r- Viajc at i t 
cooroy, ar. J* *or»ard •varottt Mr* waitar *. aiaaaon, mr« 
ftafeart La*«ao, aiaa Am S« Macdoaaia, t*r. *aor?» Moora* He* 
3*aul y« *oohiar< Hra# Hary A* PirociojalOt Mr* <?oaaj&t c» Saajfcr* 
Siator Taraaa Semar*, 5.S.P.* slate* n. Francis 3tegi<* # 5«8*3«» 
ear* Bverett a* fhiatie* pr. John fyroll* Or. Willi** C* 
and Up* r <a tir letoo) lijupd* *JTr» 



Deriag 1964 it lax 
rwoOQW aorie* a 

the jwrcxyyaat toaeee 
'"reaiilti aui iodioet* 

fnoajf imiafl end 

| pa* aVOaaM ji» ' :. 

edition of the peg 
the televiaion tea 

a literature aeria 
^onaiota of fitae 

taaio of tins *ttaaika 
eatriea* latrodttoec 

•IWWWey^WpJp %&i^w9u& >e* aa*» #> * < 

haa iaaon aaaaaaMe^ 



ore 



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a«3iool ayatana. thia aoriai 
orofttiva ability mmemi aoooo4 9**6 
oooood a^rodora froai tho »aa chvood j 
awardad a M tod4terd Hadal" hy thalx 
pabliohad aa a roauit of thoir aaoa 



i^^B^a a^^s^w^a ^^^^^^^^w ^^-<o* ^^ai^^^a av'flMta^vwa aaji^* 4Bfc^^p^na%^ 

va> to tea **tlrod, a ap a a UXiy aiajao 
oomiiHi worn* atoaaavoY* tha ourviooXiaa 
tlMy did not wiah to aoo t^a tlunao 
Li tar a tuns 3 and Scionea 6) dia- 
that raylaaaaaint of thaaa aariaa bo 
TtuNtofovo# dKurioaj tha X#64»69 ae^ool 
viawiog two aaw paro^ipa»»— a oo^iaod 
ale aarloa featuring fany sal®tan «a 

id OntitiOd I9i« i^ttJMiwi - SZHfi and 

lad tRB ftOQMMOlii* Tha iattor a arl<ta 
of tha -mtfftan ling picture aoolrjr in 

a^waa*w'™ ^awa" aa^a^B^ a^aBiHa^B>aa^^**» ^a» a^ oa «at aaam *^*#^** 

Kaat -dbaalaaaMS aanac laULy &>r tha 
raw. A SoOk w D rai Travel i»a 

^^w ^^^a^a^^waw OT^^vMw^Bnaaaiwawa'^O' «mea ^a^.w<a>aa' ^^^^op aa^ara^^ 
'^B^Wwa ■*»^a ^a» v^^atvavainara^^tm a»%# ww^aa^ap 

~-*a an oaaiaq»Ia» ai-^it 
XI school la Quioey tanro 
aohax for the booka tlaay 
atooa with thia 



.-•■'■ 



. 



tOO COWK tOO* the new third and fourth grade literature series, 
also presented rm 21 IWCH CIAtffeSCOK' s MWMt television 
teactter, &r». Mary *?aoe YUrchak. And, our third revised aeries, 
science *, entitled WRL3 Of CHMttS, featured lor tee second 
time Nr* Oene Gray as the television teacher. 

Me were plecsed to expand our field trips program this year 
toy the inclusion of a trip down the Freedom Trail* a two~pcrt 
visit to the nation's Capitol Building* and three Uilms on 
early American life— colonial Williamsburg, fcev fingland par* 
Coasntnity, and The long Journey West* 

these series, along with two other now ones which eajas to us 
iram Hew Hampshire and new Torn, (AW AT ram PBWSRTIPS and 
ttt T5ACHHK3 Of UlADtPO) * brought the total Of 21 ZB€B CfcASS- 
ROOM seriea presentations for the school year to twenty-four. 
They included phonies and science program* for grade 1, music, 
science and literature for grade 2, literature and science 
for exude 3, art and science for grade 5, French for grades 
4, ft, 6, a news background program, entitled PSACSS XV tttS 
HWfS, for grades $ through 7, science for grade 6, field trip 
specials for grades ft through 0, for junior and senior high 
grades— sewrax. V* TUB SEA (serins science) , ACCftttf 00 MBSXC, 
PRACTICAL POLITICS, ACTIOS AT LAW, HUHAJttTISS, and SBMGBSP0AU3! 
SPSCXAi&~-an, in-service teacher's courses in math and reading • 

Per the first time there were two offerings on our telecast 
schedule for viewers during after- school hours* One was a 
course entitle* lip asadxhs, a specialised course for the 
hard of hearing, the other an introductory course in electro- 
nics entitled f&SCTltQOXCS AT work* 

mm 






in June, 19*5, ALL AOOOf TOO, our science series for grade 1* 
received an Ohio State Award *in recognition of outstanding 
achievement in instructional television," the sixth such award 
to he presented to a 21 ZOCH CLASSBOOm production. 

The third grade science series, !■*» AMD S8A, and laat year's 
Ohio State Award's winner, was awarded a contract for national 
distribution toy the great Plains Regional Xastructional tele- 
vision Ubrary. K&MOMttOO m&z&tms, a second grade science 
series, was also awarded a contract Bar national distribution 
toy the same library- 






Tho nood for aora room for our growing organisation brought 
about tho rolo©atio» of the 21 am CZM9»om to now and mmtm 
aoaoioua offioos a& 30 franklin Stroat, Boston* 



**.* 



Although tho aacooutiv* Conmittoo took stapa during 19*£~*4 to 
bring educational toievinlon to *oro children in the Cosmon- 
waalth by tho erection of two translator* in tho areas nonr 
SpringfiaiJ and Amherst, the major atop this winter wae the 
alanine; Of a coatraot between tho Committee and Jansky and 
•alloy* engineering oensultante. Tho firm of Janaky and 
Bailey haa abroad to convict a wi5*~*eale technical engineeriae; 
survey to determine tho feasibility of bringing instructional 
television to all of tho Commonwealth, Many atatos now have 
a atate~wlde educational network, and it la hoped that in tho 
vary noar futura ao will Massachusetts. A final report ia 
expected to bo published baforo tha conclusion of tho next 
fiscal year* 



STATISTICS 

FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT 
OF EDUCATION 

FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30,1965 



(From Massachusetts Financial Report 

prepared by the Comptroller's Bureau) 



'■><£? 2 






3iJ I 



GENERAL FUND 
RECEIPTS BY DEPARTMENTS AND SOURCE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 



c 



Department 

EDUCATION: 

Division of State Colleges 
Division of University Extension 
Division of the Blind 
Community School Lunch Program 
Division of Vocational Education 

Division of Special Education 

Administration 

Division of Library Extension 

Teachers' Retirement Board 

Schools and Colleges: 

University of Massachusetts 
Massachusetts Maritime Academy 
Massachusetts College of Art 
State Colleges: 

Bridge water 

Fitchburg 

Boston 

Framingham 

Salem 

Worcester 

Westfield 

Lowell 

North Adams 
Technological Institutes: 

Lowell 

Southeastern 
Regional Community Colleges: 

Massachusetts Bay - Boston 

Holyoke 

Berkshire - Pittsfield 

Quinsigamond - Worcester 

Cape Cod - Hyannis 

Northern Essex - Haverhill 

Greenfield 

Mt. Wachusett - Gardner 

North Shore - Beverly 

Youth Service Board: 
Administration 
Industrial School for Boys 
Lyman School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 
Institute of Juvenile Guidance 

Reception and Detention Facilities for Boys 
Residential Treatment Unit, Oakdale 
Reception and Detention Facilities for Girls 
Youth Forestry Camp 

Total 



Total 
Receipts 



Taxes & 
Surtaxes 



$ 1 506 538 04 


411 327 98 


277 876 06 


50 000 00 


34 662 17 


14 710 66 


3 104 74 


1 943 00 


3 50 


3 780 225 60 


193 586 71 


105 964 03 


672 646 80 


667 659 23 


563 846 75 


472 613 08 


421 196 81 


260 184 73 


246 880 97 


182 140 64 


151 610 07 


780 140 73 


358 696 78 


271 820 77 


257 067 52 


167 625 24 


162 633 09 


146 009 60 


138 478 78 


96 766 40 


55 286 70 


6 150 00 


38 798 39 


15 370 52 


13 593 54 


8 521 46 


1 563 00 


1 423 59 


966 91 


647 93 


474 00 


$ 12 540 756 52 



Fees, Fines 
& Penalties 



$ 1 505 409 34 
314 352 11 



Contributions 
& Assessments 



3 465 25 



1 658 00 



2 316 915 93 

55 070 00 

105 187 00 

339 762 00 
281 657 70 
561 862 84 
218 755 25 
387 331 00 
258 953 00 
179 687 40 
177 403 28 
102 380 90 

681 942 93 
336 866 67 

270 704 51 

256 498 11 

167 446 36 

162 464 40 

145 833 19 

138 290 32 

95 462 33 

55 266 90 

6 150 00 



10 000 00 
20 000 00 



$ 9 126 776 72 



$ 30 000 00 



325 






GENERAL FUND 
RECEIPTS BY DEPARTMENTS AND SOURCE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965 



)) 



Interest & 


Licen 


ses 


Reimbursement 






Federal 




Income 


& Permits 


for Services 


Rents 


Sales 


Reimbursement 


Miscellaneous 




$ 




$ 


$ - v 


$ 359 00 


$ 


$ 769 70 


- 


3 29( 


- 


- 


24 299 49 


68 235 97 


1 150 41 


_ 




12 00 


29 237 50 


- 


248 184 14 


_ 


442 42 


_ 


- 




50 000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




15 941 50 


- 


- 


10 600 38 


4 655 04 


_ 


_ 




14 710 66 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


2 10( 


- 


105 04 


382 00 


- 


517 70 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


285 00 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


3 50 




116 00 


166 733 98 


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STATEMENT 
TRUST FUNDS 



EXPENDABLE PRINCIPAL AND 



TRUST FUND ACCOUNT 



Education: 

Massachusetts College of Art: 

Mercy A. Bailey <| 

Robert Charles Billings 

Annie E. Blake Scholarship 

Annie L. Cox Scholarship 

Marguerite Guilfoyle 

Rebecca R. Joslin Scholarship 

Albert H. Munsell 
State Colleges: 

Bridgewater: 

Alice Smithick Mills 
Elizabeth Case Stevens 

Framingham: 

Robert Charles Billings 
Helen M. Joyce Student Aid 
Marion Louise Miller 
Student Aid 

Salem: 

Susan Marvin Barker Scholarship 
Walter Parker Beckwith Scholarship 
Ella Franklin Carr Memorial 
Louise O. Twombly Scholarship 
National Science Foundation Grt. - sec. sch 
Harriet L. Martin Scholarship 



Noble Rockwood Scholarship 



Westfield: 

Julia S. 
Worcester: 

Ella M. Whitney Scholarship 
Lowell Technological Institute: 

Research Foundation 



Balance 






Balance 


July 1, 


Receipts 


Payments 




1964 


Total 


P 199 36 


$ 138 16 


$ 100 00 


$ 237 52 


194 49 


59 38 


100 00 


153 87 


445 80 


300 00 


275 00 


470 80 


255 58 


100 00 


100 00 


255 58 


1 067 04 


40 00 


- 


1 107 04 


2 864 31 


267 48 a 


_ 


3 131 79 


991 77 


262 59 


500 00 


754 36 


_ 


27 93 




27 93 


666 91 


550 00 


205 36 


1 011 55 


883 58 


42 26 


_ 


925 84 


3 526 61 


110 97 


_ 


3 637 58 


359 16 


6 00 


_ 


365 16 


361 30 


15 00 


- 


376 30 


111 32 


128 48 


100 00 


139 80 


381 69 


162 50 


- 


544 19 


1 167 82 


30 00 


100 00 


1 097 82 


36 86 


3 00 


- 


39 86 


2 763 53 


9 200 00 


9 697 41 


2 266 12 


155 15 


100 00 


- 


255 15 


416 89 


200 00 


- 


616 89 


2 70 


15 00 


15 00 


2 70 


68 671 85 


1 112 724 06 


1 128 813 82 


52 582 09 



c 



345 



TRUST FUNDS 



i 







EXPENDABLE PRINCIPAL 


AND 




Balance 






Balance 




July 1, 
1964 


Receipts 






TRUST FUND ACCOUNT 


Payments 


Total 


Education: 










Division of the Blind: 










Educational Purposes $ 39 843 41 


$ 8 395 91 


$ 1 989 81 $ 


46 249 51 


Jean M. LeBrun 


2 443 73 


55 20 


_ 


2 498 93 


Michael R. McCarthy 


25 154 85 


46 081 14 


- 


71 235 99 


Lena M. Robinson 


6 581 17 


240 00 


_ 


6 821 17 


Division of Library Extension: 










Elizabeth P. Sohier 


4 775 08 


120 00 


25 00 


4 870 08 


Other Educational: 










Mary A. Case 


30 00 


1 200 00 


1 094 00 


136 00 


Regional Community Colleges 


843 98 


- 


341 07 


502 91 


Gustavus A. Hinckley 


435 44 


150 40 


_ 


585 84 


Massachusetts School Fund # 


27 203 86 


164 586 84 


159 545 68 


32 245 02 


Millicent Library 


8 34 


3 500 00 


3 500 00 


8 34 


School Lunch Distribution and Salvage 


88 003 41 


380 546 47 


347 362 76 


121 187 12 


Elizabeth R. Stevens 


- 


764 92 


764 92 


_ 


Frank S. Stevens 


76 66 


990 15 


1 066 81 


_ 


Surplus Property Board 


83 441 37 


208 643 28 


204 933 22 


87 151 43 


Technical Education - Comm. Endowment 


- 


5 007 60 


5 007 60 


_ 


Technical Education - U. S. Endowment 


- 


10 950 00 


10 950 00 


_ 


Todd Teachers' College 


8 241 51 


772 09 


318 06 


8 695 54 


Division of Youth Service: 










Industrial School for Girls: 










Fay 


906 38 


30 82 


- 


937 20 


Lamb 


1 275 06 


31 87 


100 00 


1 206 93 


Rogers Book 


208 14 


27 60 


_ 


235 74 


School Lunch Program 


1 680 93 


2 464 58 


2 010 75 


2 134 76 


Industrial School for Boys: 










School Lunch Program 


6 304 47 


7 152 86 


6 447 41 


7 009 92 


Institute of Juvenile Guidance: 










School Lunch Program 


1 731 21 


1 851 06 


1 977 18 


1 605 09 


Lyman School for Boys: 










Lamb 


1 957 31 


49 00 


. 


2 006 31 


Lyman 


74 407 20 


2 530 55 


_ 


76 937 75 


Lyman Trust 


3 025 34 


1 492 50 


30 00 


4 487 84 


School Lunch Program 


12 737 37 


5 661 58 


11 534 71 


6 864 24 


Reception and Detention Facilities for Boys: 










School Lunch Program 


1 222 70 


2 970 56 


1 385 05 


2 808 21 


Reception and Detention Facilities for Girls: 










School Lunch Program 


851 49 


908 54 


_ 


1 760 03 


Residential Treatment Center - Oakdale: 










John Augustus 


131 50 


_ 


_ 


131 50 


School Lunch Program 


3 325 88 


1 710 10 


3 418 16 


1 617 82 


Stephen L. French Forestry Camp: 










School Lunch Program 


880 46 


388 32 


290 34 


978 44 


Female Wards 


2 088 62 


619 78 


311 90 


2 396 50 


Male Wards 


1 111 74 


1 086 14 


1 205 00 


992 88 


Sub-total, Education Trust $ 


486 452 33 


$ 1 985 462 67 


$ 1 905 616 02 $ 


566 298 98 



i 



346 



- 






XXX 






















(Schedule No. 


1) 




















INCOME 






NON • 


: EXPENDABLE 


PRINCIPAL 












Balance 


















. June 30, 


1965 


July 1, 
1964 


Deposited 


Withdrawn 




Balance 


J 


une 


30, 


1965 


Cash 


Investments 




Total 




Cash 




Investments 


£ 237 52 


$ 


$ 1 598 93 


$ - 


$ - 


$ 


1 598 93 


$ 






$ 1 598 93 


153 87 




1 500 00 








1 500 00 




- 




1 500 00 


470 80 


- 


10 000 00 


- 


- 




10 000 00 




- 




10 000 00 


255 58 


- 


2 500 00 


- 


- 




2 500 00 




- 




2 500 00 


107 04 


1 000 00 


- 


- 


- 




- 




- 




- 


507 79 


2 624 00 


4 209 46 


- 


- 




4 209 46 




877 6 


3 331 80 


754 36 


- 


9 217 61 


- 


- 




9 217 61 




- 




9 217 61 


27 93 




1 000 00 








1 000 00 








1 000 00 


1 Oil 55 


- 


15 000 00 


- 


- 




15 000 00 




- 




15 000 00 


925 84 


_ 


1 500 00 


_ 


_ 




1 500 00 




_ 




1 500 00 


337 58 


3 300 00 


- 


- 


- 




_ 




- 




_ 


165 16 


200 00 


- 


_ 


_ 




_ 




_ 




_ 


376 30 


- 


500 00 


- 


- 




500 00 




- 




500 00 


139 80 


_ 


4 053 54 


_ 


_ 




4 053 54 




_ 




4 053 54 


544 19 


- 


5 000 00 


- 


_ 




5 000 00 




_ 




5 000 00 


97 82 


1 000 00 


- 


- 


_ 




- 




_ 




_ 


39 86 


- 


100 00 


- 


_ 




100 00 




_ 




100 00 


2 266 12 


- 


- 


- 


- 




_ 




_ 




_ 


255 15 


- 


2 500 00 


- 


- 




2 500 00 




- 




2 500 00 


616 89 


- 


5 000 00 


- 


- 




5 000 00 




- 




5 000 00 


2 70 


- 


500 00 


- 


- 




500 00 




- 




500 00 


52 582 09 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 




_ 




_ 



' 






(Schedule No. 1) 



INCOME 








NON - 


EXPENDABLE PRINCIPAL 










Balance 








Balanc e 


J 


line 30, 


1965 


June 30, 


1965 






















July 1, 
1964 


Deposited 


Withdrawn 












Total 




Cash 




Cash 


Investments 


Investments 


$ 2 749 51 


$ 43 500 00 


$ 


$ 


_ 


$ - 


$ 


$ 


- 


$ 


498 93 


2 000 00 


- 




" 


~ 










45 235 99 


26 000 00 


- 




~ 


- 


~ 








821 17 


6 000 00 


- 




~ 












870 08 


4 000 00 


- 




- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


136 00 


_ 


30 000 00 




- 


- 


30 000 00 




- 


30 000 00 


502 91 

585 84 

32 245 02 

8 34 


- 


5 000 00 

5 000 000 00 

100 000 00 




- 


- 


5 000 00 

5 000 000 00 

100 000 00 




4 716 70 


5 000 00 

4 995 283 30 

100 000 00 


121 187 12 


- 


24 873 15 




_ 


"■ 


24 873 15 




_ 


24 873 15 




_ 


25 000 00 




- 


- 


25 000 00 




- 


25 000 00 


87 151 43 


- 


142 000 00 




" 


~ 


142 000 00 




_ 


142 000 00 






219 000 00 




_ 


_ 


219 000 00 




- 


219 300 00 


695 54 


8 000 00 


12 100 00 




- 


- 


12 100 00 




226 36 


11 873 64 


937 20 




1 000 00 






_ 


1 000 00 




- 


1 000 00 


206 93 


1 000 00 


_ 




- 


- 


- 




- 


~ 


235 74 




1 000 00 




- 


- 


1 000 00 




- 


1 000 00 


2 134 76 


- 


- 




- 


- 


~ 




" 




7 009 92 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


1 605 09 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


856 31 


1 150 00 


_ 




_ 


- 


- 




- 


- 


1 722 35 


75 215 40 


_ 




_ 


- 


- 




- 


- 


4 487 84 


_ 


27 000 00 




- 


- 


27 000 00 




- 


27 000 00 


6 864 24 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 




- 


" 


2 808 21 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


1 760 03 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


131 50 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 


- 




- 


- 


1 617 82 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 




- 


— 


978 44 




. 






_ 


_ 




_ 


- 


2 396 50 


_ 


13 201 72 




_ 


_ 


13 201 72 




202 72 


12 999 00 


992 88 


- 


13 240 95 
$5 677 595 36 


$ 


150 69 
150 69 


- 


13 391 64 
$5 677 746 05 


$ 


1 002 75 
7 026 19 


12 388 89 


$ 391 309 58 


$ 174 989 40 


$ - 


$5 670 719 86 



34H 



DETAILED TRANSACTIONS OF OTHER TRUST FUNDS 



INCOME OF MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL FUND (Code 6254) # 
(G. L. (Ter. Ed. ) c. 7, s. 35) 

RECEIPTS 



Cash Balance, July 1, 1964 

Revenue Received: 

Investment earnings 



27 203 86 

164 586 84 
191 790 70 



PAYMENTS 



Expenditures: 
Postage 

Accrued interest 
Transfer to Income Tax Fund (for cities and towns) 

Cash Balance, June 30, 1965 

Fund Balance, June 30, 1965 



$ 3 65 

3 121 70 

156 420 33 


$ 


159 545 68 
32 245 02 




$ 


191 790 70 



From cities and towns 
Balance, July 1, 1964 



Expenses 

Balance, June 30, 1965 



AGENCY FUNDS 



EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION PROGRAM FUND (Code 6981) 
(G. L. (Ter. Ed. ) c. 71, s. 13F) 

RECEIPTS 



PAYMENTS 



$ 


227 842 64 
89 767 96 


$ 


317 610 60 


$ 


176 088 81 
141 521 79 


$ 


317 610 60 



i 



STATEMENT XIV 
SUMMARY OF STATE AID TO CITIES AND TOWNS 
1963 - 1965 



Fiscal 
Year 

1965 
1964 
1963 







STATE 


FUNDS 








Total 


Public Welfare 
and Health 


Education 


Highway 


Veterans' 
Services 


$ 


Other 


$273 423 865 59 
253 897 964 26 
234 573 639 42 


$168 403 998 82 
153 194 703 62 
148 475 728 88 


$ 79 849 054 48 
69 181 764 48 
60 441 038 56 


$ 12 658 998 84 
18 588 634 14 
14 433 063 34 


$ 9 750 704 13 

10 531 890 59 

9 216 739 87 


2 761 109 32 
2 400 971 43 
2 007 068 77 



-Mi) 



■ 



TABLE MO. 1 - Roster of State-aided Vocational 
and Part-time Schools 

School Taar Ending Juno 30, 1?6£. 

Four hundred twenty-nine (129) schools In operation during the year (or now) 
in one hundred fifty**!* (156) cities, towns, counties, and regions listed 
alphabetically by types of schools, with date of establishment and name of 
Director* 

Group I la • fifty-five Industrial Schools (boys) 

Apponequet Regional Vocational High (Lakcville) * Sept. 19f>'9| Lloyd E. Tabor 

Arlington Technical and Vocational High - Sept. 1916} Edmund J. Lewis 

Attleboro Trade High - Hov. 193l»} Henry A. Miller 

Avon Vocational - Sept, 1956 j Charles B. rancis 

Barnstable Vocational High (Hyannis) ~ Hot. 1938 | Victor £• Hassarella 

Belmont Vocational High • Sept. 19h3j Leslie s*« rowson 

Beverly - lauds H, Patten Trade High - Nov. 1926) Robert A. Watson, Acting 

Boston Trade High • Feb. 1912 J Edward Terrensi 

Brockton Trade High - March 193^3 Ralph J. Bunpu* 

Cfcioopee Vocational High » Sept. 1921} Henry J. Hege 

Dartmouth Vocational * Sept. 1917} Antone Bettencourt 

Dighton-ilehoboth Regional Vocational (Borth Dighton) - Aug. 1960f Charles F. Day 

Everett Vocational High - Sept. 1927} John W. Bates 

Pall River - Dlman Vocational High - Hay 19l6| John P. Harrington 

Fitchburg Vocational High - July 1936| Franklin K. Angevine 

Framingham Vocational High - Sept. 1916} Joseph P. Keefe 

Gloucester Vocational • Sept. 19u0} Uarol B. oeary, I r. 

Greenfield Vocational - June 1936| ftalph I« Packard 

Haverhill Trade - Nov. 1926| Thomas P. aarvey 

Holyoks Trade High • Sept. 1911 | William J. can 

King Philip Regional Vocational High ( rentham) - Oct. 1957} Preston I. Titus 

Leominster Trade High - Sept. 193k J rails 3. Johnson 

Lowell Trade High • Sept. 1911} Charles P# "onion 

Iyim Independent Industrial Shoemaklng - Aug, 1918 } Stephen R. Callahan 

Lynn Trade High - Sept. 19US} Kichael C, ^Bonnell 

Xalden Vocational High - Sept. 1911} Thomas Lafionatis 

Marlboro Vocational • Sept. 19M} Joseuh • rucchi 

Medford - Kelvin V. veldon Vocational High • Kov. 1930} Walter 0. 3eld 

santuckct Vocational » Sept. 19tl| James '. Celley 

How Bedford Vocational High - Nov. 1908} z. -alter Janiak 

sew Salem Vocational High • Sept. 19£8} Paul R. Wilbur 

Newton Technical High - Feb. 1909 % Orrin M. Brawn 

North Adams - Charles K. McCann Vocational Technical High - Sept. 1962} 

James a. Westell 
Borthampton»s Vocational - Oct. 1908t B. tanley rowgert 
Kcrthbridgo Vocational (Whitinsville) - H&rch 193k} James S. Kullaney 
Peebody Vocational High • Sept. 1911} Kenneth H. Briggs 
Pittsfield Vocational - April 193k J William L. Gehey 
Provincetown Vccaticnal - Sept. 1919 } Arthur P. Malchman 
Quiney Trade m Sept. 1912 } Maurice J. Daly 
emndolph Vocational High - Aug. 1955} Thomas L. Warren 
Salem Vocational High • Sept. 1931} John K. Conway 



f 






^^■P * 






< 









(I! 



35U 



Group I la • Fifty-five Industrial School* (Soya) (continued) 



Silver Lake Regional Vocational Hi^jh (Kingston) - Aug. 1955 1 Ralph H* gj 

So»*rvlll« Trad* High - Sept. 1910j Salter E« itruble 

Couthbridge - Cola Trad* High - March 1932 j Ravaond L. W. Benoit 

South Shor* Vocational Technical High (Hanover) • iept. 1962 j Frederick J. Teed 

Springfield Trade High - Sept. 1911 % Sdmond P. Oarvey 

Swansea Trade • Sept* 1952 I Donald F. McCaffrey 

Tantaaqua Regional Vocational ( turbrldge) «• Sept. 19&4t Henry A. Pappaa 

Taunton Vocational *> Sept. 1951 1 Patrick- B« grona 

Walthaa Vocational High - Sept. 1928| Lloyd F. VanAredale 

Varehaa Vocational High - Sept. 1953 J John J. Rolfe 

Webater - Bartlett Vocational High - Aug. 191*7 1 •■rank S. wyide 

Wcetfiald Trad* High - Sept. 1911| Klchael Gonsale* 

Weymouth Vocational Technical High - Feb. l?2hf Ray a. Parker 

Worcester Soya* Trade High • Feb. 1910 | Walter B. Dennen 

Group I la * Six Trade Preparatory Softools for Boya and Men 

Fitchburg • Oct. 196l| Franklin N. Angevin* 

Leosdnator * Dec. 1960| Kail* S. Johnson 

Iynn - Oct. I960} J a/tea P. Barry 

North Adaaa • Charles il. MoCann - Oct. 1?53| Jane* R. WeataU 

Pittafield a Oct. 196i*| William L. Dehey 

Walthaa • Jan. 1961; Lloyd ?• VanArsdale 

Uestficld m Oct. 1962 | Kichael Gonsale* 

Group I lb • Six Day Industrial Schools (Girl*) 

Boston Trade High for Glrla - Sept. 1909} Helen M. Horan 

Essex County Independent Trad* and Industrial Trade for Girl* (Hathorn*) - 

Oct. 1957j Jam** F. Gallant 
Fall River * Bimea Vocational High for Girl* - Sept. 19h8j John P. flarrington 
Norwood - Henry 0. Peabody for Girl* - Sept* 1912 f Mrs. M. Adele Karcoux 
Springfield Trade High for Girl* - Jan. 1931 f !Sd«ond ?. Garvey 
Worcester - liavid Hale Fanning Trad* High for Girl* - 5ept. 1911 j Blanch* H* Penn 

Group I lb - Thr** Trad* Preparatory Schools for Girls and k*oa»n 

Boston - Jan* 1953 f Helen M* Horan 

Fall River - Sept* l?$8j John P. Harrington 

Springfield - Oct. 19i?lf Dorothea Jameson 

Group I le - Seven Industrial Departments (Boston) 

Brighton • I *b. 1929| Alexander Pascarotti 
Charles town - Feb. 192 9 l Hartin K. Sean* 
Dorch*st*r - Feb. 1929| Walter J. Barry 
East Boston - Feb. 1929 j Hurray Solomon 
Ifcrde Park - Feb. 1929 | John P. Uoyl* 
Koxbury - :.:spt. 1929 J Albert ?. Banrahan 
South Boston « Jan. 1929; Stephen ?. Eeilly 






r 



35! 

Group I 2a - Eighteen Part-tic* Cooperative Trade Schools 

Arlington * Feb. 195U} EAiwul •*« Lewis 
Beverly - Aug. 1909 | Xobert A. Watson, Acting 
Boston! Brighton e> Sept. 1922 j Alexander Psssaretti 

Charlestown - iept. 1919} Martin U eane 

Dorchester - ept. 1920} Walter 4% carry 

Fast Boston - Juno 1925} Hurray ,-cloraon 

Hyde Park - Sept. 1919} John P. toyle 

Roxbury - c ept. 1929} Albert ?. 'lanrahan 

South Boston • Jan. 1929} Stephen T. fie illy 
Fitchburg • Oct. 19$? J Franklin M. Angevine 
Haverhill - Oct. i?£3i Thomas F. uarvey 

iyoke - March 19n8| William J. Dean 
Newton - Xareh 195h} <rrin H. Drawn 
Horthsmpton a Sept. l?53j • tanley Dow&ert 
Pittsfield e Sept, 1951} William L. Delisy 
Southbrid^e - >nt. 1919} Raymond L. W. Senoit 
Soringfieid - 11 1951} Edmond ?. Garvey 
Westfield - Kay 1951 f Michael Gonsales 

Group I 2c • Thirty-seven Fvenin^ industrial Schools (Hen) 

Apponequet Regional - Oct. 196Ji| Lloyd E. Tabor 

Barnstable - Oct. 1956*} Victor K. ISassarella 

Beaton - Oct. 1908 $ Irthur J. Driacoll 

Brockton • Sept. 19u5j Ralph 9. Bumpus, Acting; 

Ghicopee m June 19h5} Henry J. Regs 

Dighton-Rehoboth Regional (Horth Oighton) - Jan. 1963 I Charles K. Day 

Fall River - Oct. 19^7} Charles E. Matte 

Fremlnghsm - Oct* 19k5f Joseph P. Keefe 

Greenfield - Jan. 1962 j Ralph E. Packard 

Haverhill - March 1950} Thomas F. Oarvey 

Holyoke - April l?h5} William J. Dean 

King Philip Regional (-rentham) Kov. 1958} Preston I. Titus 

Lawrence - March 1908} Daniel f« Sullivan 

Leominster • March 1951} £mlle S. Johnson 

Lowell - Oct. 1915} Charles P. Conlon 

Lynn Shoe - Jan. 1927} Stephen E. Callahan 

Lynn Trade - t. 1916} James P. Barry 

Kalden - Oct. 19^5} Thomas Laflonatis 

Marlboro • Oct. 19n6} Joseph D. Brucchi 

Hedford - Kov. 1930} Salter D. Held 

Kew Bedford - Nov. 1907} Z. Walter Janiak 

Bewton - Feb. 1909} Orrin M. Brawn 

Rorth Adams - Charles H. McCann - Oct. 1963} James R. Westell 

Northampton • ?et. 1956} B. Stanley Dowgert 

Pittsfield - Oct. 1918} Villiam L. Dehey 

Provincetowm • Jan. 196U} Arthur f. Kalchmsa 

Qulncy - Hov. 19lo} Laurence i'. jabin 

Salem - . ct. 19>6} Jchn M. ^nway 

vSoaerville Evening frade • Get. 19U6} Walter E. r truble 

Scuthbridge - Oct. 1936} Frank P. Skinyon 

South Shore Vocational Technical Kvening Industrial (Hanover) • Jan. 1963} 

Frederick J. Teed 
Springfield - Feb. 1916} Dorothea Jameson 



(I 



I 






( 



J«<C 



Oreup I 2c • Thirty-seven Evening Industrial Schools (Men) (continued) 

Taunton - <ct. 19S&3 Swiett tfell*0«4. \cting 
Walths* - Kov. 19l5t Lloyd *« 7aiUrsdaln 
Westfield - Oct. T?16| Michael Gonsalen 
Weymouth - Oct, l?£?f Ray 0. Parker 

- r**, l?r> j '-'alter ». Dernxm 

Oroup - 2c 2 - Ons Evening Trade tltlrtf School (Wonen) 

- ;t. 1961ij Blanch** K. Perm 

Group I 2d • Twenty-two Apprenticeship Schools 

Boston - \ T ov. 1^1 | »>ffrey J. Keating 

Boston Journeyman - 0«t. 19** 5 J Jeffrey J, bating 

Brockton si 0~t. 19h6| Ralph 3. Buapus, Acting 

Fitchburg - * T o*. 1 - 6i Franklin W. Anserine; 

Haverhill - Harsh 19h9j Thonas P. Oarvey 

Bolyoke - *ov. I9u6j Willis** J. IMan 

Sing Philip ne^ional (^renthsn) • Oct. 19*1 1 Preston I. Titus 

tiavrence • Dec. 19*j6j Daniel P. Sullivan 

Leominster • 19?*6| "taile S. Johnson 

Lowell - Oct. 1»-6| Charles P. Conlon 

Lynn - Jan. M7| Jesses P. Barry 

Maiden - Oct. l.*»U6j Thgsisg Laflonatia 

Marlboro - Jan. 19«7| Joseph D. 9rucchi 

Medford « V.ov. 19»^j tttHsjp D. Reid 

fmrton - Oct. 1919 | Orrin W. Prawn 

Pittafleld - Soot. l??7j Willian L, nehsy 

*ncy - Oct. 19h° irenca H. Pabin 

3pringfield • Oct. 1? ! >j Dorothea Ja-teson 
Tnunton - Feb. tSklf *w»tt Hellwood, Acting 
Waltham - °<ept. 196Aj Lloyd P. VanAradale 
Weymouth - Oct. 1962 f Ray 0. Parker 
Worcester - bjj Waiter ?». Sennan 

Group III la - Kino Fosiswakinn Schools 

Caatoridss - Oec. 1935 J John M. Tobin 
Kvorett - Oct. 19.13? John W # Bates 
Pall Piver • Sent. 19n2) John P. Harringtoa 
Lowell - Sept. 1911 j harles P. Conlon 
Hew Bedford - M ov. 1907 j g, Walter Janiak 
Hew Salen • Sept. 1935 1 Paul R, Wilbur 
Hcrthanpton - Oct. 190$ j B. Stanley PtS f tf Sff t 
tgflsld - Jan. V*Vi Maend P. Oarvey 
•cester • Jan. 1931? Blanche ft". Pens 

Oroup III lb - Thirty-nisht Oay Household Arts Departewrots 

•d.ims - r>ef%t 19*1 tolUal I, MmA 

Appeasquet Regional (Lakeville) - Sept. 1961j John P. Bsll 
Barnstable - est. 1933 s Victor E. Massarella 
Pelchertown • March 192S| Donald P. Qeer 
Beverly • Sept. 1937f William J, Foley 
Bourne - Sept. 1928 } Clayton E. Caapbell 



( 












3J 

Group III lb - Thirty-eight Day household Arts r apartments 

(continued) 

Charlton - Sept. 19i*9| Willia* P. Bell 
Dartmouth • Sapt. 193?} Antone Pettencourt 
Duxbury • Sept. 1953 J Everett L« andy 
Easton - Stnt. 1950f Julian f« Preuee 
Fall Rirar - Nov. 1919 j Tbor.jae w. Haawond 
Falfdooth - April 19?5j Russell P. Marshall 

r>oro - -ftyU 1953 } Vfilliaa A. Glynn 

U©y - Aug. 1955 J '-cwerd J. Kulecki 
Haverhill - Sept. 1921 1 Robert Jackson 
Hudson - Sept. 1933) 'art in J. 'riemey 

King Philip Regional (Wrentha*) m Sept. l?58f Warren H. Presley 
Lee - Sept. 193 thor L. celcone 
Xerahfield ~ .'j Jawee P. Rcweo 

Harrafcdiis^tt Regional (3&ldwinviU«) - : ■•*. t. 1957 1 Anthony T. Safka 
Wewburyport - i c?t. 1?M| Frincia T. RreiniliMl 
Worth Adam - Jan. 1935 1 Hobert *♦ Taylor 
Northbridge - "epr.. 1^39; v 'rs* Margaret S. Leonard 
Worth ^rockfield - Beat. 1953j Oeorge S. ^rtsaoll 
Palner - ^ept. l°)6l tanley rienisaeweki 
'.ttsfieU - 3ept. l???j Villian L. Dehey 
roviuceiown - . 31 ; Arthur , llchnan 

.gsn - ^ept, stcr R. Arnold 
Saugus - Sept. 1955 I Ash ton F« Bavia 

tuate - Sept* 19?! i Edward L. Stewart 
Silver Lake Regional aton) - July 1955| lalph H. Binna 
Senerville - Wov» !9?0f Leo C. Donahue 
Tewksbury • Sept. l?59f Lawrence *t. KoOewui 
Wachuaett Regional {-'olden) - Aug. 195u? *eal ?. Sktllings 
warehe* - Sept, 1?5?J John J. Rolfe 
West r>ri4gewater - See*. 19J$1| Donald A. Flsbe? 
rfeetpert - ^arch 1921 J Harold 3. Wood 
tfinohendoa • Sept. 1936) Ralph . 



Qreup III 3 - One hundred thirty-three Evening Practical Art S 

Abington - April 19h5j Leonard 0. Palopoli 

Adaas - Sept. 195lij Andrew CUrliotti 

Agawaa - Jan* 1?57| Richard H. Barry 

Aaherst-Pelhaa 1e;ional (Awherst) • Oat. 1956j Paul B, Healy 

Andover «• 3ct. 19Jt5j Richard S. Seal 

Apponequet Regional - Cat. 1961 j Lie . Taber 

Arlington - Jan. l'>#)j Charles Fagone and Ralph Gioicaa 

Athcl - Ja.« 19>G; irtis F. Buapus 

Auburn - apt. l?56f Priacilla A. Barney 

Ayer - Nov. V )<j . 'raw J. Soule 

Barnstable - «ov. IvtSj Victor E. Hasaarella 

Bedford - >ci. 1 | Joseph I, Herlihy 

^elsaont - Oct. 1951 1 John F. Heher, Jr. 

Beverly • Sept. V ? 19t >mine J. "eliaonte 

Billerica - Oct. \9$k ' *■ D * O'Brien 

Beaton - Oet* 191? j harlee S. Schroeder 

Bourne - 3ct. r "Vij 4r». Alice G, ?yson 

Brainttrea • Jan. 1M9| o. Robert Jingosiaa 









' 









354 



Oroup HI 3 - On* hundred thirty-throe Evening Practical Art Schools 

(continued) 

Brtdgewater - Oct. 1951j Albert F. Hunt, Jr. 

Brockton - Nov* 1926$ Ralph 3. Bumpus 

Brockline • Jan. 191 7 j Wendell H. «>Mki 

Burlington - March 19iV9| Robert B. Murphy 

Cambridge -Dec. 191*2 \ John K* Tcbln 

Canton • Oct* 19% $ John a. 0«Connell 

Chatham - Oct* 1950 J Jeese J* Morgan 

Chelmsford * Nov* 1962 j George J* Be teas 

Jhicopee e Nov* 1921 j Henry J. Rage 

Concord-Carlisle Regional (Concord) • Sept* 1961 j Joseph C. Regan 

Danvera • Oct* 1962 | Katharine H. Lavler 

Dartmouth • March 1951 j An tone Bettencourt 

Douglae • Oct* I960} K. Deane iicyt 

Dover • Oct* 1963 J Frits F, Idndquiat 

Duxbury m Oct* 1953 J Everett L. Kandy 

East Bridgewater - Oct. 1961t| Gilbert Allan Ward 

^asthampton - Oct* 1953 I Anthony R* Hu scant i 

test Longmeadow - Jan* 1951 I Robert J. J arris 

Easton - Sept* 1957f Julian S* Preuss 

Essex - Oct. 1955| Foster E. Ball 

Essex County (li&thorae) - July 1913 1 James Gallant 

Everett - Oet. 1911| John W* Bates 

Fall River • June 191*3 1 John P. Harrington 

Falmouth - March 1951 I Huesell B. Marshall 

Foxboro - Jan* 1961} John P. Certure 

Franklin - Jan* 1919 | Mrs* Helen 0* Thomas 

Frontier Regional (South Decrfield) • Feb* 1960| V*vry J* Zukowski 

Gardner - Jan* 1962 j Mrs* Helen 0* Polymeros 

Gloucester - March 1935*1 Kenneth £* Sticknoy 

Greenfield * Oct. 19l8| Ralph E. Packard 

iiadley * March 195S| Edward J. Huleokl 

Hanover - April 19ii8j Philip 8, Center 

Harwich • Marsh 1950s Jesse J. Morgan 

Haverhill - Sept* 1961* | Robert S. Jackson 

HinghsM • Oct* 1957| Theodore I. Ricci, Jr. 

Rolbrook • Oct. 1950| Irvin D. Reads 

fiolyoke • Oct. !9Uf r. Marcella Kelly 

Hudson - Jan. 19U5| Martin J. Tiorney 

Hull - Feb. 1950| Peter V. Garofoli 

King Philip Regional (terentham) - Hov. 1958| Preston I. Titus 

Lawrence - March 1908 % Daniel F. Sullivan 

Lenox - Nov. 1951} Hiram F. Battey 

Leominster • Feb. 1916 j Steven C. Christy, Acting 

Lexington - Oct* 19l6j Russell 0* Mann 

Lowell - Sept* 19U| Charles P. Conlon 

Lunenburg - Jan* 1962 J Leo Millea, Jr. 

lynn - Feb* 1920| raneis V. Kennedy 

Bahar, Ralph G*, Regional (Orange) - Oct. I958f John E. Roche, Jr. 

Manchester - Oct* 1959 f Foster H* Ball 

Medfleld - Oct* 1961 j John Cuoco 

Medford - Oct* 1922 j Catherine Fuller 

Melrose - March 19n6| Leon Tinel 

Hethuen « Oct* 1912 | .alter B* Ingalls 

Kiddleboro • March I9li9| Xenneth L. Johnson 

Milford - Feb. 1955| Havid I, Davoren 

Millie - Mareh 19a3j CJeorge C. Soy 






( 






- 



oup III 3 * Out hundred thirtvthree tvuming Practical Art Schools 
(continued) 

Milton - April 1916} Robert E. Dsakin 

Montague - Oct* 195U} Kobert L. Flaisted 

Marragansett Regional (Bsldvinville) - Oct. 1958 I Anthony T. Safka 

Now Bedford - Kov* 7 ; . waiter Janiak 

Hewton - fob. 19091 Orrin M. Srann 

Xorth Adams - Oct. 191*8} Robert Creato 

Korthampton - April 191*2 j B. Stanley Dowgert 

North Attleboro * Jan. 1950} Leon A. Regan 

Rcrthbridge - fcov. l?Llf James S. Mullaney 

North aeadlag - Hareh 1959} U «*•*•* *• Lasenby 

Norwell - Oct. 1955} Frederick A. Small 

Norwood • Oct. 19lL$ Krs. H. Adele Narcoux 

Old Eochoster Regional (Rochester) - Jan. 1962 } Harold M. Gay 

Palaer - KaroU 1916} Leo J. . antucci 

Pioneer 7alley Regional (Morthfield) - March 1958} F. Sumner Turner 

Pittsfield • Oct. 19U3} William L. Dehey 

Plymouth - Oct. 1956 } Joseph L. Robinson 

Provincctown m Oct. 1916} Arthur P. Malchman 

Quinoy • Rov. 19h5| Chester 7. Sweatt 

Randolph • a ril 19li5} Francis A. Colosl 

Reading • Oct. 1957 | John R. Coplthorno 

Revere - Feb. l?5Ul Louis 0. Perullo 

Rockland • Oct. 19^9} Robert 0. Watson 

Sales - Oct. 19li0| Patrick Ta Fallon 

Saugus • Jan. 1957} Louise Solomita 

Scituate * i>ec. 1951} Edward J. Blelskl 

Sharon • ?ct. 196b} Arthur W. Danielson 

8helburne - Jan. 1956 1 iioy A. Hither, Jr. 

Silver Lake Regional (Kingston) - Jan. 1956} Richard St. Onge 

Somerset - Sept. 1928} Thomas J. Daly 

Somerrille - Oct. 1911} Leo fit Donahue 

Southbridge - Sept. l?li?} Frank P. Skinyon 

South Hadley m Oct. 1953} William ft. Peek 

Spencer m Hov. 1913} Edward R« HoJOonough 

Springfield m Oct. 1935} Dennis J. urunton 

Stoughton m Sept. 1^53} Donald W. Kiatis 

Swempscott - Oct. 1957} Harold I. Power 

Swansea - Sept. 19171 Mrs. Avis B. Phillips 

Taunton • Oct. 1915} Bsaett Wellwood, Acting 

Tewksbury e> Oct. I960} Francis Sheehan 

Truro - Nov. 1919} Arthur P. Malchman 

Wakefield - Feb. 19&! John S. Xynski 

Waltham • Nov. 191*3} Edward P. Chaisson 

Ware - Oct. 1962} Mrs. Josie Buskey 

Vereham - Feb. 1950} John J. Rclfo 

Webster - lee. 193^} Howard V. McOuinness 

Wellesley * Oct. 1950} Salvatorc W. Simons 

West Bridgewater - Oct. 1963} Donald A. Fisher 

vest field - iiov. 19M} Michael Consoles 

Westport m Oct. 1955} Harold S. Wood 

West Sprinefield - Oct. 1961} Mrs. Mary R. A # Levett 

Wostwood - Oct. 191*2} nuane jt, Kocina 

Weymouth - Oct. 19**6} Harold 3, Olson 

Whitman-Hanson iiegional (hitman) - Oct. 1961} Eobert S. Teahan 

Wilmington • Oet. 1962} Rarold S. Shea 

Winchondon - Wov. 19lUi} Ralph K. Meacham 

Woburn • Jan. 1952} James F. Erennan 

Worcester - ept. 1911} Blanche M. Penn 



356 

Group IV X* - *ive Say Agriculture" cola 

Pristol County sganaet) - Sept. 1913 J John B, Farrar 

fssex County Agricultural and Technicl 'nstitutc (Kathorne) - Oct, 1913* 

James F. Gallant 
>?ew Salem - Sept* | Paul R. *Ub 

•folk County (Walpole) - Oct. 1>16j Foster K. Weiss 

•thampton • Smith's - Oct. 1908| P. Stanley Dewgert 

Grotep IV lb - Thirteen Vocational Agricultural Dcpartnenta with 
turnes of instructors (days) 1 

Barnstable - tept* 1: | ierald L. White 

-ton (Jamaica Main) - Bar* 19l8j Henry Q, Vendler, Coordinator 
Charlton - Sept. I9h9{ Paul Frost, Jr. 
Kadley - July 1955 J Frank J. Wilson 
?'©rragansett Regional (Paldwinville) - Sept* 1957 | Charles A# Howard 

rookfiel' - ily 1956; David P. "oramcr 
Pioneer Galley Regional (Horthfield) - .-.©pt* 1957 J Russell A. Goodwin 
Shelbume - March 1920j Kraest R. Gif fin 
Silver Lak? R*nio-:al (Kingston) - July 1955? 3eorge H. Fraser 

J ocVbridjire - June 1936f Kenneth W. Milligan 
Wachusett regions! T clden) - July Iffkj Frederick S. Warren 
Westport - Aug. 19?5» Joseph F. Szala 
Worcester • Key tflTj Jasper J. Perednia 

Qroup IV 3 - Five Vocational Agricultural Departments 'evening) 

rlstel County »£anset) ■ Oct. 19h0j John 3. Farrar 
gssex County (Katborn*) - Dec. 1926} Janes F. Gallant 
Sarragansett Regional 'Paldwinville) - . 1958 f Anthony T. Safka 
Wfechusett Regional ddan) - I cv, 19$6f Seal T. Skillings 
llestpert - July 1953? Karold S. Wood 

Oroup V la - Twenty-four Part- time Cooperative Distributive 
Occupations Schools 

Overly - Sept.. 19j?f William J. Foley 
Bottom Dorchester - .Sept. 1937$ t'dtrard Leach 

last Boston - Sept. 1937f Tdward Leach 

Bjy4c Park - Sept, 1961 j Kdward Leach 

Jamaica Plain - Sept. 1937i Edward Leach 

Jeremiah R. Burke - Sept. 1960| Edward Leach 
Braintree • Sept. !96lf Walter a* Jf;Jelm 
Brockton - Sept. 19Mi$ Ralph G. Bumpus 
Chicopee - c ept. 1950$ John L. Fitspatrick 
Rseer County (Rathorne) - Dec. 1960 j Jaiaes F. Dallant 
Fitchburg - A^ril 1956 j Stephen T. Wcodbury 
Lowell - Sept. "»9li6| Charles P. Conlon 
Hal den - Sept, 1962 $ Thomas Lafionatis 

-'^ri - *»• I9»t| eltof K r -eid 
Melrose - Sent, lo ; tanley Robinson 
Peabcdy - Rev. 19£6j Arthur J. Barry 
tt* field - Bgpt, Ifiilj ilUam U Dehey 
^ney - Sept. l»6j Lloyd M. 'relfhton 









Qroup ? la • Twenty-four Part-time Cooperative Distributive 

;cupations Schools (continued) 

Sales - 3ept. 191*8$ John M. Conway 
Sau^ua - A ^ril 1961$ Aahton F. Davis 
Sowerville - Sept. 19l*8f Walter £. Struble 
Springfield - Sept. 1963 j Edmond P. Garvey 
Waltham - Sept. 1963 | Lloyd F. VanArsdale 
Weymouth - Sept. 1960$ Wallace L. Whittle 

Group V 2 - Three Evening Distributive Occupations Schools 

Boston - April 191*3? Sdnard Leach 
Kalden • Nov, 1953$ Thomas Lafionatis 
Pittsfield - Nov. 19531 William L. Dehey 

Croup VI 1 - Thirteen Day Practical Nursing choole 

Boston - Sept. 1957 $ Helen M. Koran 

Essex County (Eathorne) - Dec. 1961 $ Janes F. Gallant 

Fall River - Sept. 1959 | John P. Harrington 

Holyoke - Feb. 1965 I William J. Dean 

Lawrence - opt. 1958 j Daniel F. Sullivan 

Lowell - Sept. 1962$ Charles P. Conlon 

Horth Adams - Charles !• MeCann - Oct. 1962$ James &• Westell 

Northampton - Nov. 1960$ B. Stanley Dowgert 

Norwood - Sept. 1960$ Mrs. K« Adele Marcoux 

Pittsfield - Feb. 1958$ William L. Dehey 

Springfield • Sept. 1957$ Edmond P. Garvey 

Taunton - Feb, 1957$ Patrick H. Lyons 

Worcester - Sept. 1953$ Blanche H. Penn 

Qroup ?I 2 - Three Evening Trade Extension Schools (Women) - 
I ractical Nursing 

Fall Hirer - Sept. 1961$ John P. Harrington 
Springfield • Sept. 1957$ Dorothea Jameson 
Worcester - Sept. 196k $ Blanche m* Penn 

Group VII 1 - Fifteen Day Area Vocational School* 

Arlington m lefts 1961$ Edmund J. Lewis 

Beverly - Nov. 196l}f Robert A. Wats* n $ Acting 

Boston - Sept. 196k $ Philip A. Spang 

Fall River * Sept. 1959$ John P. Harrington 

Leominster - feb. 1959$ Smile S. Johnson 

Lynn - Feb. 1959$ Michael C. O'Donnell 

Hedford - Sept. 1959$ Walter D. Reid 

Hew Bedford - Sept. 1961$ Z. Walter Janiak 

Newton - Feb. 1959$ Orrin M. Brawn 

Pittsfield - Feb. 1959$ Willism L. Dehey 

Quincy - Fern. 1959$ Maurice J. Daly 

South Shore » Feb. 1963$ Frederick J. Teed 

Springfield - Sept. 1959$ Edmond P. Oarvey 

Weymouth m Sept. 1962$ Ray G. Parker 

Worcester Industrial Technical Institute - Sept. 1960$ Walter 8. Dennen 



(II 









(I 



. 358 

Group VII 2 - Thirteen *:y©nin re* Yooaticnal Schools 

Fall River - Sept* 196).} Charles £• Matte 
Frawlngham - Sept. ; Joseph P* Keefe 
Leominster - Sov* 1959 1 Kails S* Johnson 
Lynn • Oct. 1959 f Jastes P* Berry 
Bedford - Sept. 19S9j Welter D. Reid 
flew Bedford - Hot. 1960| 2. Walter Janiak 
Pittsfield - Jan. I960} William L. Dehey 
Quincy - Oct* 1960j Laurence R. Babin 
South Shore - Jan. 1963j Frederick J. Teed 
Springfield • Nov. 1961} Dorothea Jameson 
Valthaa - Dec. 196? j Lloyd f« VanArsdaie 
Vestfield • Sept. 7.963} Michael Oonsales 
Worcester - Feb. 1960| Welter B. Dsnnen 






ihe Principal of the High School usually serves as Director 



Table No. 2 - Consolidated Financial Statement by Types of Schools 
School Tear Ending June 30, I96I* 



3513 



CITIES, TOWNS, 
COUNTIES AND RECJONS 



GROUP I la -BOSS' DAI INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS 

Apponequet Regional 
Arlington 
Attleboro 
Avon 

Barnstable 
Belmont 
Beverly- 
Boston 
Brockton 
Cambridge 
Chicopee 
Dartmouth 

Dighton-Rehoboth Regional 
Everett 

Fall River - Diaan 
Fitchburg 
Framingham 
Gloucester 
Greenfield 
Haverhill 
Holyoke 

King Philip Regional 
Leominster 
Lowell 

Lynn Shoe 

Lynn Trade 

Maiden 

Marlboro 

Medford - Melvin V. Weldon 

Nantucket 

New Bedford 

New Salem 

Newton 

North Adams - uharles H. McCann 

Northampton* 8 

Northbridge 

Peabody 

Pittsfield 

Province town 

QuLney 

Randolph 

Salem 



EXPENDITURES 



Capital 

Expenditures 
2 



700.22 

$89.1*8 

1,212.78 

1,861*. lh 
1*01*, 799.53 
1,159.15 
7,732.93 
2,001.73 



11*7.30 

951.U1* 

1,137.1*9 

3,226.97 

5U.95 

1U9.50 

U,965.65 

10,001.8U 
2,31*7.71 
1,687.33 
1,1143.81 

120.00 
3,182.23 

653.U2 

5U0.62 
11,01*3.70 

120.86 

11,783.19 

1,028.85- 

9,197.05 

73,553.78 

15,725.76 

72.59 

11*6.32 

191.35 

2,11*5.29 

7,1*55.1*9 

10,672.20 



School 
Maintenance 

3 



52,681*.1*7 
106,971.26 
123,066.71* 

19,913.69 
101,250.92 

80,116.25 
118,372.87 
955,11*9.10 

97,020.80 

53,1*71.72 
159,971*.10 

20,966.1*6 

56,038.57 
221,525.21 
182,219.00 

79,709.13 
10l*,61*3.58 

97,381.83 
123,858.95 
335,269.27 
17U,89l*.33 

66,1*27.26 
105,162.05 
199,01*0.69 
110,921.02 
198,150.95 

89,599.1*6 

68,821.07 
202,097.72 

29,OOl*.l*0 
389,187.1*8 

30,511*. 95 
275,131*. 96 
291,077.53 
206,081*.08 

12,796.1*9 

70,373.97 
169,958.72 

21,102.50 
239,609.56 

23,286.51* 

80,717.80 



TotaT 
1* 



53,381*.69 
107,560.71* 
12l*,279*52 

19,913*69 
103,115.06 
1*81*,915.78 
119,532.02 
962,882.01 

99,022.53 

53,1*71.72 
159,971*.1<? 

21,135.76 

56,990.01 
222,662.70 
185,1*1*5.97 

79,761*.08 
101*, 793.08 
102,31*7.1*8 
123,858.95 
3U5,271.U 
177,21*2.01* 

68,111*.59 
106,305.86 
199,160.69 
lll*,103.25 
198,80l*.37 

90,11*0.08 

79,861*.77 
202,218.58 

29,00l*.l*0 
1*00,970.67 

31,51*3.80 
281*,332.01 
361*,631.31 
221,809.81* 

12,869.08 

70,520.29 
170,150.07 

23,21*7.79 
21*7,065.05 

23,286.51* 

91,390.00 



RECEIPTS 



School 
Income 

5 



15,217.37 
H*,992.87 
6,955*76 
51*5*1*5 
10,223.88 
10,1*33.07 
13,916*36 
87,852.12 

31,71*9.35 
200.00 
11,1*97.86 
1*71.35 
16,990.53 
19,251.50 

5,216.51 

5,061.62 
18,00lu79 

1,666.60 
56,1*98.61 
95,273.50 
29,626.51 

6,963*08 

9,890.16 
17,1*50.51* 
17,597.99 

9,671*. 97 

6,877.51 
21,801.95 
27,976.81* 

3,282.10 
72,1*51.21 
28,168.78 
1*9,891.1*5 
121,270.1*9 
77,725.01 
1*89.73 

5,287.69 
16,1*63.08 

1,380.67 

26,266.90 

181*.05 

2,39l*.60 



Net 

Maintenance 
6 



37,1*67.10 
21,973.39 

116,110*98 
19,368 *2l* 
91,027*01* 
69,683*18 

10l*,l*56*51 

867,296*98 
65,271*1*5 
53,271*72 

1*8,1*76.21* 

20,517*11 
39,01*8*01* 

202,273.71 

177,002.1*9 

7U,61*?.5l 

86,638.79 

95,715.23 

67,360*31* 

239,995*77 

11*5,267.82 

59,1*61*.18 

95,271.8? 
181,590.15 

93,323.03 
188,1*75.98 

82,721.95 

1*7,019.12 
17l»,120.88 

25,722.30 
316,736.27 
2,31*6.17 
225,21*3.51 
169,807.01* 
128,359.07 

12,306.76 

65,086.28 

153,1*95.61* 

19,721.83 
213,31*2.66 

23,102.1*9 
78,323.20 



State Reimbursement" 



18,733*55 
1*5,989*19 
58,055.1*9 
9,681*.12 
1*5,513*52 
3U,8U1.59 
52,228*25 

1*33,61*8.1*9 
32,635.73 
26,635.86 
7l*,238il2 
10,258.55 
19,521**02 

101,136*86 
88,501.25 
37,323.76 
1*3,319*39 
1*7,857*62 
33,680*17 

119,997*89 
72,633.91 
29,732*09 

"£« 

1*6,661.52 
9l*,237.99 
1*1,360.98 
23,509.56 
87,060.1*1* 
12,861.15 

158,368.11* 
1,173.09 

112,621.75 
81*,903.52 
61»,179.51» 
6,153.38 
32,51*3.11* 
76,71*7.82 
9,860.92 

106,671.33 
11,551.25 
39,161.60 



I la ( 



) 



ollrer Lata* <(* c 1om1 
»rvllla 

• Cola 



Sprlacfiald 
Ta 



^••bater • fiartlatt 

Waatfteld 



TOTAL 



OMBP X la 1 - JMT TRAOK • TIP! C • TMM 
PttPAlATORI (BOO) 



Jortu A4a*a - Cbarlaa ■• NaCaan 
iortibrUft* 

WalliUHB 

•atflald 
Tom 
MM* i lb - ems' dai iitmitt ■chooib 



Baataa 
laaaa County 
all Rliar - Slnaa 
W atwaa i • Haw? o, 

SpriagUgJi 

• DavU Hala . 



TOTAL 

OMBP I lb* . J WT TAAI* - TIP! C - TtAW 
PSIPAftATJRT (TIPI C) 



5.362.22 

6,035.71 
fc5,olU.J>3 
17,777.62 

8.118.23 

m«tj 
it*?* 

2.096.88 
3,831.?5 

ii3,96U.au 

796,911.22 



UlO.59 



Pall livor 
Spttagflald 

TOTAL 



302.53 

U17.39 

l,i>63.51 

105 .75 

13,OG7»3U 

1:, ,696*52 



UU,7i2.31 

I9fc.628.96 

95*311.68 

228.333.1U 

581.eUj.78 

13,039.61 

73.739.72 

2l6.775.8t 

20.825.65 

63.12a.76 

220.597.8a 

2Ui.592.Ul 

691.52lt.83 

8.802,661.16 



7.7U1.97 



99U.37 

1,061*6$ 

1.U96.00 

1,905.09 

2.U9.85 

300.00 
3.013.U 
3,160.90 

Ui,353.98 



216.657.21 
39,071.35 
28,1.93.63 
115.396.11 
152.738.39 
217.370.31 

769,7?7.00 



2,965.00 
668.00 
863.53 

U,U96.53 






Ui,732.31 

199,991.18 

101.3U7.59 

273.3U7.37 

599.622.UO 

13,039.61 

73,8U3.00 

23fc.89U.05 

21.06U.58 

63,986.U6 

22t,69U.52 

218.U2U.16 

805,fc89.07 

9,599,572.38 



8,152.56 



99U.37 
1.06U.66 
1.U96.00 
1,905.09 
2,U1»«85 

300.00 
3,013.11 
3,160.90 

1U, 35 3.98 



216.959.7U 
39,071.35 
28,911.02 
117,259.62 
15?,8UU.1U 
230,377.65 

785,U23.52 



2,965.00 
668.00 
863.53 

U.U96.53 



1,071.00 
ll.76U.7U 

U.3U8.65 

79,869.00 

160,331.01 

18.J2M2 

22,051.79 
1,380.76 
15,892.30 
1U.995.67 
UO,90U.tO 
IOU.31,33 

1,U50,965.28 



3.240.00 



tal I 

653.UO 
675.90 
667.90 
1*9.<€ 
201.00 
393.70 

ftjSMI 

3*146.20 



17.05V.U3 
5.552.JU 
1,13U.80 
UO.671.20 
25,608.3U 
30,685.56 

120,710.09 



30.00 
30.0C 



U3.661.31 
l8t,86U.tf 

90,9*3.23 

ifc6.U6U.lfc 

U21,513.77 

13,039.61 

55,146.90 

19U,717.03 

19,UUU.89 

U7,232.fc6 

205,602.17 

173,6*7.61 

586,693.50 

7,351,755.88 



U,5U1.97 



992.27 

U11.26 

890.10 

1,237.19 

2,250.25 

99.00 

2,619.U1 

2,756.30 

11,185.78 



199*599.78 

33,579.01 

27,353.83 

7U.72u.9l 

127,130.05 

1 , .31 

4*9,016.91 



2,96,. 00 

u M 
833.53 

U.U66.53 



360 



21,830.66 
91,U3?.ll 
U5,U81.62 
7U.232.07 

210,756.89 

6,519.81 

27,708.fc5 

97,358.52 

9.722.U5 

23,616.23 

102,801.09 
M.8U3.81 

293.3U6.7S 

3,675,878.03 



2,270.99 



U96.1U 

205.63 

U10.05 

618.60 

1,125.13 

U9.50 

1,309.72 

1,378.15 

5*598.92 



99,799.8 # 

16,759.51 
13.679.fcf 
37,362.k5 
63,565.03 
93,3U2.17 

32U,508.U7 



1,' >.50 
33U.OO 
U16.77 

2,233.27 



i 



ORODPI It - 

Roe ton 

TOTAL 

(mOUP I 2* - PART-TIME COOPSRYTITI TRADE SCHJ0L3 

Arlington 

Beaton 

Fitehburg 

Haverhill 

Holyoke 

Newton 

lltHflrti 

Southbrid*o 

Springfield 

Weatfield 

TOTAL 

GROUP I 2o* - MEN'S BVENINO IMDUSTRIAL SCHOQU 

Apponequet Regional 

Barnstable 

Beverly 

Beaton 

Brockton 

Chieopaa 

Dighton-Rehoboth Regional 

-all River 

rraainghaa 

Greenfield 

Haverhill 

Holyoke 

King Philip iegion.il 







Leominster 

Lowell 

Lynn Shoe 

Lynn Trade 

Maiden 

Marlboro 

Medford 

New Bedford 

Newton 

North Adaaa - Charlea H. MaCaan 

Northampton 

Pittafield 

Province town 

wulney 






Seawrville 
Seuthbaidge 



Springfield 



11.90 
106,85 



US$.16 



323.99 
1U.63 



1*97,856.56 
1*97,856.56 



1,387.72 

~2,165.32 

228,115 .1*0 

8,935.00 

l8,22U.lih 
1*4,971.1*0 
10,71(9.50 

16,081*. 96 

25,336.05 
58,153.62 
2l*,585.39 

1*26. 708.82 



139.92 

1,120.95 

3,170.1*9 

35,189.39 

5,125.08 

7,711.51 
31*2.00 
2,818.11* 
3,589.71* 
1,686.1*7 
15,1*3U.69 
8,183.86 

1,51*5.89 
11,803.69 

1,1*96.00 
5,261*.17 
6,608.11 

8,031.33 
1,013.75 
3,310.71 
3,103.81 

13,132.61* 
$,831*.99 
1*,369.96 
853.00 
6,871».77 
91*5.00 
5,1*30.76 
2,055.37 
7,11*2.68 
1,702.1*9 
7,805.1*0 

23,375.88 



1*97,856.56 
1*97,856.56 



1,367.72 
22,165.32 

228,115.1(0 
8,935.00 
18,221*.1*1* 
U*,971.1*0 
10,71*9.50 
16,081*.98 
26,91*0.1*8 
58,153.62 
2U,585.39 

1*30,313.25 



139.92 

1,120.95 

3,170.1*9 

35,189.39 

5,125.08 

7,711.51 
31*2.00 
2,816.11* 
3,589.71* 
1,686.1*7 

15,1*31».69 
8,183.86 
1,557.79 

12,220.51* 
1,1*96.00 
5,26l*.17 
7,063.56 
8,031.33 
1,013.75 
3.63U.70 
3,118.1*1* 

13,132.61* 
5,83lu99 
1*,369«96 
853*00 
6,87l».77 
91*5.00 
5,1*30.76 

2,055.37 
7,11*2.68 
1,702.1*9 
7,805.1*0 
23,375.88 



5 

2*4,128.63 
21*,128.63 



281.25 
7,196.79 
6,227.80 

51*3.00 

12,350.00 

lt,000.00 

1*65.00 
1,532.50 
1,793.60 
8,275.58 
1,850.00 

1*1*,515.52 



139.92 

732.60 
588.60 

1*,171*.?5 

101.80 

2,959.00 

199.00 

186.60 

1,111*.20 

1,320.80 

3,81*3.75 

861.6$ 

1*58.75 

1,150.20 

1,01*8.50 

116.00 

3,873.79 

3,810.70 

180.60 

157.20 

1,206.75 

1*,939«O0 

2,056.10 

299.80 

37l*.25 

1,151*.10 

U,59oTuO 

1,072.75 

398.70 

327.00 

5,006.21* 

7,235.1*0 



1*73,727.93 
1*73,727.93 



1,106.1*7 

114,968.53 

221,688.60 

8,392.00 

5,87l*.l*lt 

10,971.1*0 

10,281*.50 

1*4,552.1*8 

23,51*2.1*5 

1*9,878.01* 

22,735.39 

381*,19i*.30 



388.35 

2,581.89 

31,011*.61* 

1*,713.28 

1*,752.51 

150.00 
2,631.5U 
2,1*75.51* 

365.67 

11,590.91* 

7,322.21 

1,067.11* 

10,653.1*9 

1*1*7.50 
5,11*8.17 
2,73*4.32 
44,189.63 

832.95 
3,153.51 
1,897.06 
8,193.56 
3,778.89 
44,070.16 

1*78.75 
5,720.67 

91*5.00 

83lt.36 

982.62 

6,71*3.98 

1,375.1*9 

2,799.16 

16,11*0.1*8 



361 



T 
236,863.97 
236,863.97 



553.21* 
7,1*81*.27 
U0,91*1*.30 
44,196.00 
2,937.22 
5,1*85.70 
5,U*2.25 
7,276.21* 

11,771.23 
214,939.02 
11,367.69 

192,097.16 



19U.18 
1,290.91* 
15,507.32 
2,356.61* 
2,376.26 
75.00 
1,315.77 
1,237.77 

182.81* 
5,795.h7 
3,661.11 

51*3.57 
5,326.75 

223.75 
2,571*.09 
1,367.16 
2,09*4.82 

106.1*8 
1,576.76 

91*8.53 
«,096.78 
1,889.1*1* 
2,035.08 

239.38 
2,860.31* 

1*72.50 

1*17.18 

4*91.31 
3,371.99 

687.75 
1,399.58 
8,070.21* 



(I 



I 2« (otmttauft*) 

Tauaton 
w«l%ht* 
~«bst#r 

WMtfleld 



TOTAL 



«nri^. 


ITUXM TBAD1 BttlBIOf scaooii 


tpriacfui* 


, 


TOTAL 




«»t *- 


srsKZK AmsfncȣXP scwou 


RMI«| 

Bm.mm.iIi1 11 


■ 


Hill >Uil 

M«l/*i» 

EiBfi Philip ft**l«B«l 


LaaaiaBttr 
Lvmll 





t 



,162.;.7 



Ptttftfiald 



»«yaouth 
»ortHMt«r 



TOTAL 



III 1ft • DAI 



v.r»U 

fall atw 






sprlaeffeld 

TOTAL 



1,780.35 
1,780.35 



130.00 
1.506.55 

126.05 
1,222.38 

S-ftlXw 
o,U0L.70 



1,U*9.85 
3,925.92 

231.88 

3,81*9.96 

1*,G90.50 

55,ftl5.8ft 

27ft,876.59 



826.69 
826.69 



£7,197.61 
ft,9ft6.10 
2,U*J*.98 
i,ft03.62 
1,631.83 
1,125.00 
ML5.36 

950.00 
3,952.39 
L,650.65 

889.00 
2,027.97 
3,000.25 
2,559.1*0 
12,031.08 
«,56?.21 
9.677.66 

606.10 

655.00 
5,51.3.17 

15fc,227.78 



25,398.30 

12,61*2.72 

32,58tt.52 
Gl*,l*65.13 
U*3»725.99 
17,765.38 
16,573.1*9 
26,1*59.51 
5L,073.6o 

W3.688.6I, 



1,1*9.85 

»« 

3,81*9.96 

«,090.50 

55,1*15.81* 

277,039.06 



826.69 

826.69 



87,197.61 
U,M. 10 
2,lftl».98 
i,i»03.82 
1,53U.S3 
1,125.00 
ft,W*5.36 

950.00 
3,952.39 
1,650.65 

689.00 
2,027.97 
3,000.25 
2,559.1*0 
12,031.08 
1»,S37.21 
9,677.86 

606.10 

655.00 
7,323.52 

156,008.13 



25,398.30 

12,612.72 
32,58i*.52 
81*,595.13 
11*5,232.51* 
17,891.1*3 
1*7,795.87 
26,1*59.51 
59,1.93.62 

1*52,093.314 



166.1*0 
233.20 

201.06 

1*26.05 

528.60 

16,665.60 

7it,2l*0.31 



36.00 
36.00 



6t*,689.80 

1,91*7.20 

531.00 

51*9*00 

392.1*0 

393.75 

153.90 

Iff*** 

612.00 

3,563.20 

567.00 

761.1*0 

3,000.25 

2,299.60 

8,353.00 

3,615.30 

3^63.20 

2S5.60 

i>\./'j 

2,627.1*7 
98,799.97 



L,092.00 

2,501.00 

566.20 

10,633.75 

52,U93.80 

13,620.00 

17,068.3ft 

2,282.30 

ft6,61*6.*9 

11*9,903.61 



953.V5 


1*91.73 


3,692.72 


1,81*6.36 


30.80 


15.10 


3,1*23.91 


1.7U.96 


3,561.90 


1,780.95 


0,750.01* 


19,375.02 



200,636.28 



55,ft27.8i 



21,306.30 

1(1,11*1.72 
32,016.32 
73,331.38 

91,232.19 

•,11*5.38 

29,505.15 

2U,177.21 

7,1*27.36 

293,785.03 



'MM 



100,316.20 



790.69 


395.UO 


790.69 


395.1*0 


22,507.61 


11,253.91 


2,998.90 


1,1*99.1*5 


1,610.98 


605.U9 


856.82 


U27.U 


1,1*1*2.1*3 


721.22 


731.25 


365.63 


L,291.ft6 


2,11*5.73 


352.1»0 


176.20 


3,31*0.39 


1,670.20 


1,087.1*5 


51.3.73 


302.00 


151.00 


1,266.57 


633.29 


SiTso 


129190 


J.67S.08 


1,839.0ft 


967.U 


1* 3.70 


6,01*1,.66 


3,022.33 


320.50 


160.25 


1*55.20 


227.60 


2,915.70 


l,ft57.65 



27,713.93 



10,653.15 

5,070.86 

16,009.16 

36,915.69 

1*5,616.20 

2,072.69 

lft,752.55 

12,066.61 

3,713.69 

U.6,892.63 



Ill lft - OAT 



kppmmqmt <*l±oa*l 







iturltoo 



rail U*r 

raUMnth 

fladlaj 

aavarhill 

IttfMB 

lint Phlli» Rational 

In 

Harahfiald 



Braokfiald 
flalmar 
itt.fi. Id 
PrwlBMUwa 



^Uw Lata Harlowa 
Saaerrilla 



Mi 

WOOF III J • IflSZIO PRACTICAL Aff SC iOOU 



Bavarl/ 

illerlaa 




277.00 



778.23 




321.97 




2,195.1*0 



1,719.1*8 




170.00 



6,01*1.65 
8,329.0k 
7,9*3.59 
k.Vk.66 
8,U?7.5tt 

ll,701.»t 
k,78l.95 
6,090.5? 
i*,71tt.36 
7,632.71 
7,039.11 
U.lli.56 

11,91*6.1*9 
k,76k.SO 

2U.975.69 
5.022.72 
7,k6k.96 
1,170.1k 

10,368.53 
6,720.73 

16,809*64 

I2,08i».89 
8,A9.2tt 
2,559.39 
9,885.32 

20,1*22.06 
2,951.16 

11,180.18 
7,6kk.06 
5,697.12 

I2,k68.60 

16^23.87 
4,661.92 
8,1,12.37 
3,868.16 

l0,lkk.6k 
5,212.21 

13,169.70 

330,816.38 



6,01(1.65 
8,329.0k 

7,9tt3.59 
li.32tt.66 
8,t77.?l 
U,/6l.62 
tt,78l.95 
6,090.59 

k,7ik.se 

7,632.71 
7,039.11 
k.558.56 

12,225.1*9 
«, 78||.50 

2tt,975.69 
5,922.72 
7,k6k.96 
5,170.1* 

10,368.53 
4,710.73 

17,587.67 

12,081u89 
8,9k9.2k 
2,559.19 
9,885.32 

20,1*22.06 
2,951.1*5 

11,180.18 
7,666.03 
5,697.12 

L2,*68.60 

16,61*3.79 
1*,661.92 
9,210.65 
3,868.16 

I0,lkk.6k 
5,212.21 

13,169.70 

333,011.76 



1,680.00 


1,660.00 


5,693.03 


5,893.03 


1*,276.00 


1*,276.00 


3,695.00 


3,695.00 


2.06k.73 


2,061*.73 


21,935.28 


23,65«.76 


2,898.60 


2,698.80 


5,113.80 


5,113.80 


3,605.78 


3,805.78 


6,655.1*9 


6,655.1*9 


532.00 


532.00 


6,32«.e$ 


6,32li.85 


5.558.91. 


5,728.9k 


1*.005.00 


k,005.00 



56. | 

1*, 700.00 




k26.fi 



200.00 
2,500.00 



5,011.67 

620.00 



958.90 




1,600.00 



8,751.58 

19,225.15 



62.00 

805.00 
l,90k.OO 

226.00 
l,k69.90 
k,667.20 

503.00 

mM 

1,026.50 
320.00 

l,20k.OO 
393.00 
387.00 



5,905.65 
3,629.0k 
7,9k3.59 
k,32k*66 
8,k77.Sk 

11,781,62 
k,761.95 
6,090.59 
k,71k.38 
7,632.71 
6,613.U 
k,558.56 

U,9kS.k9 
k,58l*.50 

22,k?5.69 
5,022.72 
7»k6k.96 
5,170.1k 

10,366.53 
6,720.73 

11,796.97 

U.261i.fl9 
8,919.2k 
2,559.39 
3,^73.83 

20^22,06 
1,992.55 

U,l80.1i 
7,6tii«.06 
$,697.12 

10,668.60 

16.523.67 
k,66l.92 
8,1*12.37 
3,868.16 

10,lki*.6k 
5,212.21 

10,U .12 

305,579.5k 



1,596.00 
5,086.03 

2,372.00 
3,k67.00 

591..83 
17,268.08 
2,99.80 
k,610.80 
3,kk6.fi 
5,626.99 

212.00 
5,120.8$ 

5,165.9k 
3,6lfc.O0 



3(i3 



2,992.82 

l,8lk.52 
3.971.80 
2.162.33 
MfS.77 
5,690.91 
2,390.98 
3,01*5.30 
2,357.19 
3,816.36 
3,306.56 
? ,279.28 
5,97k.25 
2,292.2$ 

U,237.65 
2,5U.36 
3,732.1*8 
2,565.07 
$,l8k.27 
3,360.37 
$,6984*9 
5,632.Uk 
k,k7k.62 
1,279.70 
1,936.82 

10,211.03 
996.27 
5,590.09 
3,822.03 
2,8k8.56 
$,33k«30 
8,261.9k 
2,330.96 
k,206.19 
l,93k.08 
5,072.1*2 
2,606.12 
5,209.06 

152,789.87 



799.00 
2,5kk.02 
1,186.00 
1,733.50 

297.1*2 
8,63b.Ok 
I,kk9.k0 
2,305.kO 
l,723.k? 
2,81k.50 

106.00 
2,560.1*3 
2,582.97 
1,809.00 




5>?5«SJ 



atonal 



OrMaflall 
H«dl«y 

H«fwi«h 
ii»T»rhlll 



Htt 

Uac PkUi»l»fUMl 




19.73 
Ib6i».50 



■ c., 
HaaelMstsr 
M*df«rd 



iilfort 



37,327.67 
1,4*65.00 
3,501.85 
l,3Ut.00 
8,207.9b 

37,iu.**6 

3,3ei.ii3 

6,0b0.b8 
5,277.00 
1,3211.21 
3,7C0.8k 
13,2W.07 
10,373.93 
5,290.00 
1,855.00 

661.X 

5U0.20 
1,C2!*.00 
1,330.00 
1,91*8.00 
2,5Jb*90 
2,295.52 

765.00 
36,723.72 
3,9b2.55 
b,891.00 
1,690.00 
1,818.7b 
3,502.U2 
1,787.00 
7,255.13 
5,1*30.85 
1,0*0.85 

560.00 
3,361.00 
2,11*2.00 

1,615.00 
2,657.00 
2,290.00 

32,653.02 

2,155.00 

2,1*76.05 
3,396.62 

26,299.0(4 

705.00 

6,311.00 

10,292.78 

9,59J*.33 

i,88b.80 

13,761.51 
2,518.73 

1,6J»6.10 
10,590.1*9 
k,356.50 
5,81*5.81, 
1,055.27 
b,839.78 



37,327.67 
1^65.00 
3, r .«il.85 
l,3bb.6« 
6,207*9% 

37.369.01 
3,381.hJ 
6,«i0.L8 
5,222.00 
t»888.?i 
3.900.N. 

13,21*2.07 

10,373.93 

5,290.00 

1,355.00 

661.00 

5Wi.?u 

1,02*4.30 
1,330.00 
1,91*6.00 
2,53b.90 
2,295.52 

785.00 
38,723.72 
3.9U2.55 
14,591.00 
1,690.00 
1,818.7b 
3,502.1*2 
1,787.00 
7,255.13 
5,1*30.85 
b,Oi*0.85 

56o.oo 
3,361.00 

l!»fc5 

2,857.00 

2,290.00 

32 # 653.C2 

2,155.00 

2.b76.c£ 

3,1*16.55 

26,763.51* 

705.00 

6,311.00 

10,292.78 
9,59b.33 
l,88b.80 

I3,781.frl 
2,516.73 
1,6*48.10 

10,590.1*9 
l*,356.50 
5,8145.81* 
1,055.27 
b,839.78 



71*3.00 
575.00 
111.00 
530.80 
3,6&3.30 



MMI 

300.00 

3,31*1.60 
5,177.60 
2,299.00 
2,32£.90 



AMI 

69.60 
262.00 
223.00 

1*63.00 

1*7.00 

31*1.25 

67.80 

1,723.00 
255.60 

1,1*57.00 
3,870.10 
167.00 
1,326.75 
50.00 
1,195.00 

.6*2 

1,1*20.00 

75.60 

2,136.25 

300.00 



2,150.70 

l,853Tuo 
3,819.50 

290.25 

670.00 

1,6142.27 
231*.00 
1*60.00 



1,265.00 
166.00 

6I4.OO 
1*1*0.00 



37,327.6? 

7?2.0O 

2,926.65 

1,233.00 
7,677.11* 
33,1*60.16 
3,#1.U3 
6 # 0li0.1*8 
l*,928.0O 
1,588.21 

559.21* 
6,06b.b7 
6,071».93 
2,961.10 
1,855.00 

661.00 

1,02*4.00 
1,260.20 
1,666.00 
2,311.90 
1,632.52 
736.00 

36,382.1*7 
3,91.2.55 
14,623.20 
1,690.00 
95.71* 
3,21*6.62 
330.00 
3,385.03 
5,21*3.85 
2,7U*.lO 
530.00 
2,166.00 
1,818.00 
1,1*89.00 
1,1*37.00 
9,2114.140 

30,5114.77 
1,655.00 

}$!& 

2t,^*8.3b 
705.00 
l*,l*57.60 
6,1*73.28 
9,30i..08 
1,011*.80 

12,139.2b 
2,2814.73 
1,168.10 
9,930.1*9 
3,091.50 
5,659.6b 
991.27 
b,399.76 



364 



361.00 

I,u6i.b3 

616.50 

3/*39.57 

16,7?0.09 

1,690.71 

3,0?0.2b 

2,U6k.O0 

79b.l0 

279.62 

l*,032.2b 

1,037.1.7 

1,1.30.55 

92T.50 

330.50 

iisToo 

630.10 
833.00 

1,155.95 

916.26 

369.00 

19,191.21* 

1,971.28 

2,bU.60 

81*5.00 

b7.87 

l,623.bl 

165.0c: 

1,692.52 

2,621.93 

1,357.01 

265.00 

1,083.00 

909.00 

7l*b.50 

718.50 

1,107.20 

15,257.39 

927.50 

ijBM 

12,071.17 

352*50 
2,228.80 
3,236.6b 
b,652.0b 

507.10 
6,069.62 
1,11*2.36 

59b.05 
b,965.25 
l,5b5.75 
2,829.92 

b95.6b 
2,199.89 



1 



Ill (continued) 



JttlliB 

tilton 



tfarrar aneett Regional 
Bedford 



North Attleboro 
.'iortibridj* 
North Heading 
ill 



Old 



Pioneer Valley Regional 

Pittsfiold 

Plymouth 

Province town 

Quincy 



10U.17 



iMpi 

ocituate 

Shelburne 

Silver Lake Regional 

Soaereet 

Sonerrille 

Soutiibridge 

South Hadley 

Spencer 

Springfield 

Stoughton 

Swaapeeott 

-wansea 
Taunton 
Tevks! ury 
Truro 

akefield 
. alt tarn 






MTC M 

Webster 
Kelleeley 

•est rid| euiter 

estfield 
Westport 
Meet Spri.i. field 
Weetvood 



Whitaan-iiaii 
Wilmington 
lM .endon 



tie t .ional 



1,125.00 
5,578.10 
2,l(ll(.75 
1,610.00 
18,317.87 
17,1*53.13 
2,765.1*1 
1,755.50 
3,1*77.92 
2,01*3.69 
1*,515.00 
i,5l5.oo 
6,552.oo 

2,060.00 
2,253.1*0 
1,250.00 
8,702.82 
2,1(30.60 
630.00 

19,739.68 
3,958.00 
l»,2l*2.O0 
621.25 
2,383.00 
3,630.07 
6,600.71* 
5,371.00 
1,31*5.00 
1,058.04 
1,81*5.00 
3,578.56 
8,331.67 
2,161.76 
2,305.18 
1,223.00 

58,186.1(9 

2,965.73 

2,636.00 

2,920.05 

1»,951*.65 

3,729.91 

1470.00 

6,200.62 

5,629.00 

975.00 

1 2,269.00 

1,102.50 

9,711.39 

1,160.00 

HV21.82 

767.10 

3,1*15.39 

5,31*5.00 

11,202.71. 
l*,2l*3.0O 
3,71*5.10 
2,015.00 



1,125.00 
5,578.10 
2,1*11*.75 
1,610.00 
18,317.87 
17,557.30 

2,765.1*1 
1,755.50 
3,1*77.92 
2,01*3.69 
1*,515.00 
1,515.00 
6,552.00 
2,060.00 
2,253.1*0 
1,250.00 
8,702.82 
2,1*30.60 
630.00 

19,739.68 
3,958.00 
1*,21*2.00 
821.25 
2,383.00 
3,630.07 
6,800.7b 
5,371.00 
1,31*5.00 
1,058.01* 
1,61*5.00 
3,578.56 
8,331.67 
2,161.76 
2,305.18 
1,2? 3.00 

58,166.1*9 
2,965.73 
2,636.00 
2,920.05 
U,951».85 
3,729.91 
1*70.00 
6,200.62 
5,629.00 
975.00 
2,269.00 
1,102.50 
9,711.39 
1,160.00 

114,021.82 

767.10 

3,1*15.39 

5,31*5.00 

11,202.71* 
l*,2l*3.O0 
3,71*5.10 
2,015.00 






21*5.00 
1,507.00 

751.1*0 

1*96.80 
3,906.1(0 
3,660.00 

1*1*1.63 
1,1*77.00 

219.1*0 

1,196.25 
617.38 
375.60 
U3.00 

207.20 
1,1*1*0.50 
1*26.00 
200.00 
939.00 
650.00 
1,092.00 

50.oo 

300.00 
199.00 

1,862.30 
671.00 
189.00 
1*89.60 
1*61.65 
31.80 
**25.00 
133.50 

1,380.00 

ai5.5o 

10,800.35 

1*89.1*0 

1,092.00 

1,057.20 

1,015.80 

231».00 

1,951».00 

390.00 

975.00 

1*00.00 

11*4.30 

5,1*02.00 

1,076.50 

2,668.50 

1,031.00 
562.00 

738.00 
195.00 
925.70 



660.00 

1*,071.10 

1,663.35 

1,113.20 

ll*,l*ll.l*7 

13,793.13 

2,323.78 

HMl 

3,258.52 
2,01*3.69 
3,316.75 

897.62 
6,176.1*0 
1,91*7.00 
2,253.1(0 
1,01*2.80 
7,262^32 
2,0d*.60 

630.00 

18,800.68 

3,306.00 

3,1>C00 

771.25 
2,063.00 
3,1*31.07 
1*,93 .1*1* 
1*,700.00 
1,156.00 

568.1*1* 
l,3e3.35 
3,516.76 
7,906.67 
2,028.26 

925.18 

807.50 
1(7,366.11, 

2,196.33 
i,51*li.00 
1,1-62.85 
3,939.05 
3,1*95.91 
U70.00 
J*,2U6.62 
5,239.00 

1,869.00 

968.20 

1»,309.39 

03.50 

12,153.32 

767.10 

2,361*.39 

1,763.00 

11,202.71. 

3,505.00 

3,550.10 
1,069.30 



365 



1*1*0.00 

2,035.55 

831.68 

556.61 

7,205.71* 

6,896.57 

1,161.89 

139.25 

1,629.26 

1,021.65 

1,659.38 

1*148.81 

3,068.20 

973.50 

1,126.70 

521.1(0 

3,631.16 

1,002.30 

315.00 

9,1*00.31* 

1,651(.00 

1,575.00 

385.63 

l,0ul.50 

1,7!5.51( 

2,1(69.22 

2,350.00 

578.00 

281(.22 

691.68 

1,773.38 

3,953.3l( 

1,0U(.13 

1*62.59 

1*03.75 

23,693.07 

1,21*8.17 

772.00 

931.1*3 

1,969.53 

1,71*7.96 

235.00 

2,123.31 

2,619.50 

931*.50 

1*9U.10 

2,151*.70 

1*1.75 

6,076.66 

383.55 

1,192.20 

2,391.50 

5,601.37 

1,752.50 

1,775.05 
51*1*.65 




torn 

OKW XV U • IMWIWMIX 




IV lb -MI 



ibMtUy 

■•rib irtakf told 
pioomt Vallagr bag! mm! 



n 

•ftftfiJMtt 



TOTAL 



if j • Hume mmmam* wim— i 



i, uimU '«* lootl 
Norfolk Cow*/ 
M.IUMtt ftftglaaftl 



tjtu 

080VF 7 1ft . 



r»i 
*l e ft y 

H 

Lai 

mtm 



t 

2,7->.56 
5,613.27 



i».liO.TT 



*.306.O2 

1 » s . 



68.59 

-. 
1,052.00 



. ... . 



90.fl* 



26,761. 6 
3,521.51 

793,SU.36 



.'...2 



570,682.92 

Jb,625,S6 
616,7$6.&6 

39.066.U 



1,1,11, 



11,556.56 

l<, r.?. 

7.567.35 

5,528.63 

16.699.65 

6,557.39 

7.666.96 

6.LL3.7S 

12,203.56 



6,565.06 
20,5JO.?3 

» • 



62,172.58 

966.55 
312.00 
tt.860.17 
135.00 
316.00 

175,766.30 



7,800.0k 

39,155.76 

9,663.60 

6,153.73 

» J.l- 

13.733.79 

7,258.78 

,753.01 

7,237.79 



7.175.60 

tf.t61.7l 
3»:i.5l 

798,956.63 



3 '.,137.23 
S71.33b.92 

3^.528.66 

L3.725.Ui 
IfklO.769.3J 



11.921.15 

66,812.78 

7.567.35 

5/26.63 

16,996.06 
6,557.39 
7.U68.98 
7.695.7$ 

12.203.58 



lb,662.27 
6.565.06 

?0,i.30^3 

171.b66.6li 



v.172.58 
9W..&5 
33i. 

9i.660.17 

115.00 

216.00 

175.X4.5k 



7.*KX)*0b 
39.156.76 

9,663.4,0 

yif|i9| 

'■• I,', i 

13,7*1.77 
7,7%6.7b 

8,753.01 
7,310.61 



%72.*- 
.OMI 

too.* 



>J,K3.T1 

115,621 ♦?« 

My j. I 

.41 

12.35* .3* 

ftt*?10.61 



libit .00 
',|7<.«00 




5.156.98 
,>1*.00 
^•69 




:„,6*8%t» 

312.00 

I5.65b.00 

LJ6.00 

Plfl.vX) 

21,^649 



llfWU* 
3bbOO.OO 

l,i>X).06 



I, 607. 



6 

2.8U.21 
661,712.68 

l : t a :' 

jn.tb9.6I 
lb.332.8b 

362.303.63 
26.726.08 

1.068.936.72 



10,6*2.56 

38,636.78 

7.0C7.35 

7,686.96 



10,667.58 
1,' 33.39 
9,9i'S.56 
6,069.06 

16,921.99 

12b.5'7.16 



66.60 
71,706*99 

76.206.17 

166,7"7.81 



27,7.^.76 
6,21,3^0 

?»' 

7,926.68 
7,f5e.T8 

5,0*7.01 
1,610.79 



366 



330^66*00 
163.511.36 



171»15Un 
13,33.06 

52l.Ll7.36 



3.398.67 
19,218.39 



7.C30.91 



2.6H.31 

6.636.33 

3,389.38 

73,626.53 



3,, .3.1- 

J8.103T09 

7b.398.90 



13.0n.36 
3.121.70 
2,726.86 
6.29U59 



665.60 



i 



. 



mt«fi«id 



3prU*fl»ld 



MU 



v 3- 



•anmorifi ace mtiq» 



3,202.7b 
3,275.56 



ill 

In 

ttttafield 
MM 

UMOP fl I - DAI PRACTICAL 



I MMf 
F«U Hiv»r 



Unll 

fertfc Aims . ChtfUa H. 



PittoffttM 

SUnr UIm Clonal 



I 
TOTAL 

mm f 1 1 . mufti practical 



67.00 

7b.u0 
113.85 
625.61 



5,961.69 
7,622.bb 



Sprlagflald 



OMOP til 1 • DAI ARKA TIC JHCAl VOCATXOBAL 3t'»OLf 

Mnsni 

•11 Hlw 



-ri oro 



lJ.726.Ui 

6,b; 3.* 

796.10 

15,538.50 

2,129.57 

b,616.07 



U 



PMP 



ll,l2b.8? 
7,b«7.50 
8.5?2.b7 
6,000.00 

10,1:5.1? 

20,670.bb 
9,01*2.07 

223,526.19 



12,596.80 
J>2.(V 
105.00 
100.79 

13,151t.67 



31.3bb.96 
37,823.58 
20,279.86 
2b.00b.77 
13,565.51 
32,959.75 
22,028.13 
16,67U89 
16,099.69 
1,600.00 
63.3*7.99 
19,393.91* 
5U,c67.66 

353,390.66 



958.50 
2,ll*5.b7 

3,103.97 



bS,035.1l 
J ,l 3.8B 
13.899.7b 
30.7S1.01 
20,683.2b 
17,995.09 

25,115.53 



21,275.69 

lb.680.70 

il.12b.87 

7,167.50 

8,522.1*7 

6,000.00 

10,125.12 

20,670,** 

12.2bb.81 

5,97l*.99 

226,601.75 



12,596.80 

io5.oo 
100.79 

13,15i».67 



37,823.56 

20,279.86 
2b,071.77 
13,639.51 

33,073.60 
22,653.71 

i6.!:7b.t<9 

16,099.69 

1,800.00 

lf,3tJ.9« 

60,829.35 

361,013.10 



958.50 
1.11*5 .b7 

3,103.97 



58,761.25 

10,3?3.2i» 
20,363.12 
31,51*9.U 
36,221.71* 
20.12b.66 
29,731.60 



I 

5,267.00 



I 



2.370.00 
1,707.00 
2,3*7.00 
b,582w08 
2,133^08 
2,236.16 
6,285.25 
i,97b.9f 

67>97.I3 



J. 1 



•VMI 



270,08 

10,13! .<C 

2,6J}..M 

2,397.50 

22,131 .00 

22,024.13 

8,703.3b 

1,060.00 

i/«;.oo 

bb,*li.70 

U,*t.38 

l.M.Tb 

, . --: 



19J>.60 
l»C90.5O 

l,b6j).10 



18,8l*i.oo 
6,80l>.00 

1.0*5.00 

16,011.00 
«V>17.93 



16,0 8.69 
ll.6yt.70 
8,75b.87 
5,780.50 
6,175.1.7 
l,l*l?.CO 
7,992.12 
18,1*31.28 
2,756.82 



» .) 



11,713.19 
352.08 
105.00 
100.79 

12,301.06 



31,3k.96 
37,b l.S« 
I0.lbh.86 
21,373.56 

n,i6e.oi 

10,821.75 

8,17U55 
15,039.62 

18,93^.29 
13,b06.56 
36,502.92 

2Ui.L62.66 



765.90 
87L.9T 

1,61*0.8? 



26,191.11 
9,523.21* 
7,099.7b 

29.70^.01 
b,672.2b 

11,991.09 

P2,b9/.60 



367 



8,OOb.35 

5,8b7.35 
b,377.1*b 

VB3L 

709.')0 
3,996.06 
9,217.1b 
1,378^1 



77,91*.20 



5, 71. V 

176.0b 

52.50 

50.b0 

6,150.53 



15.672.b8 

18.776.79 

5,077^3 

10,686.78 

5,58b.ai 

5,1*10.88 

b,085.T8 
7,519.81 

9,b67T65 

6,7034*28 

18,251.1*6 

107,231.35 



382.95 

*3T.*9 



13,095.55 
b,761.6f 
3.5b9.87 

lb,853.01 
2,338.12 
6.b97.S5 

U.2L8.80 



i 



IP ill ( 



T7TA1. 




iw m%^B^9 



PltWfUld 



•■■•It 
-••tfiftld 



MM 

849W' Dsjr IaiusirUl 



LrU* jv lo*iH§l4 
lrla* Trad* r«. 

lofcatrlal Jo art *> t* 
PirWUai too or*Uvo Tm*» 



•Cf lootobold Art* School* 
Ajrto 
raoticU krX 
Acrioolwra aohoa&t 



Jloiritottfo 

o ( 

8] 



i ,380o08 

,j ... 

8$,»3fc.37 



HO.** 



11,163*39 

796,9U«23 

L10.5? 

15.696.52 



Lfoaii.10 

1,760,3s 

9,u*.?o 

13,832.7a 

20o2» 
3.275.S6 

7.~& 

35,17117 
11,133.39 

•' , . •• - 



13.62fe.lt 

62,fe2$.16 

101.71 .18 
23,220.0* 
9T,0»8.73 

fa76,760.97 



2,oO3.50 
2,3*3.62 

1,81|0.00 
2.532.00 

1,707.73 
?,27*.1C 
7,vs>0.*6 
l,*l,.00 
3,339.60 
1.250.21 
1^3o.75 
1*650.16 

39.319.67 

8,808,661.16 

,7fei.97 

lit, 353.98 

769,727.00 

fctfJUJ 

27l».876^f 



Ua3.6A8.6t, 

33c»ei6.je 

793,«*1.36 
1,«11,£>6.$$ 

169,769.98 

, .) 

■ >, • .!> 

13,151.. 

3,3,3*0.66 

3,103.97 

•76,760.97 

39,319.67 

, J90,29Q.*<? 



62,fe2$, 
U»,92fe.1 

117,09$, 
28,$76, 

118,1*3 

$62,195.] 



W.J 
5, 
2, 

••J 

1,1 

2,532, 

1,707.71 

2,27*.! 

V 

, i . 
3,896.5j 



*,i i ?, 

Ut,353.! 

785^2] 

MM 
%tv 

•30,313.; 
277,019. 

i5i,ooia: 

•5*2,093.3 

3?7.0<>, 

1,336,827.< 
17M66.4 

17$,' 

296.801.') 

li.lSo, 
J61, 13. 

3,103.5 
562,195.1 

, J. 



3,*53.S>3 

l,li7o.47 
•0,118 .20 

r-6.U3.1t 
I8f,5?7.9l 



33.50 

•J2.0C 

it** 



1.233.2* 
2,200.00 

1,6**.7C 
•05.60 

3,339.60 
751.80 



l.ul 0,905.28 
3,200.00 

3,166.20 
1W.71U.09 

30.00 

2Mit.ii 

•M.51 . 

TM*0.3l 

16.00 

IV< .: 
131.60M9 
8t$,710.81 

, . 

i . 

• ) ■ ..-■ 

1^63.10 

i.-:y. Ml 



!■.«., V. 1} 2,88«,:79$.$6 



i » Ml 

-■ . L. 

:,,.. ;..u 
23,7204* 



• FH^*W^^»W9 



2.1*7.50 

, . 
1.50W32 
1,570^0 
2,£> 32.00 

.i-.- 

1» • 

~ 1 

i.nt.j$ 

. 9 



7,)S1,7S5«M 

11,195.78 

6fe9.016.91 

fe.Wfc.53 

!;-3, '?7.>1 

3*.l9fe.30 

200,636.28 

T70.lt 

. . 1 

:, . 3 
305, . « 

661,732.68 
i,Ofe2,8jL. 
;.., ... 
1^,797.61 
1S^28.J6 
12,301^6 

'" . • >' 

V 1,0.17 

tffc.l' ».06 

, .1 

12,fcl6,075.3 



7 
6,312.10 



'MiH 



6,725.02 
30,7tMt 

11,610.02 
5,307.71 

U7.08USI 



325.27 

1,073.7$ 

985.7$ 



237A 

37^$ 
3,172^8 



;,3 ■.-■' 



>,-:■, ■ . J 

2,270.99 
S.$92.92 

32I»^08J,7 

236,863.97 

192,077.16 
100,316.20 

39>.fcO 

27,713.93 

JM,? 72.63 

: » >. 
330,866.00 

521^17.36 

73.lt.--6.53 

71^398.90 

n.91i».20 

6,1^0^3 

1 7.23l.» 



U7,08U$$ 
12,32^07 

6,219,l85.n 



Table (to. 3 - Consolidated ftraary of Receipts and tuxponditurea by School* 
in Citiea, Totna, Countiee, Mid Re.lona - Vocational function 
School Xaar ending June 0, 1964 



365) 



u r :■ 



1 1 II 



mm i ■ wm ■ 



la, 2c , Ill lb, 3 
2a, in 3, VII 1 



Abin-ton -IU3 

Adane - III lb 

kf awam - III 3 

Anherst-Pelhan Rag. Ill 3 

Andover - III 3 

Appenaquat Tieg. I 

Arlington - I la, 

Athal - III 3 

Attloboro - I la 

Auburn - III 3 

Avon - I la 

Bametable - I Is, 2c , III lb, 

»i IV lb, 3 
Badford - 111 3 

Balohertown - III lb, 3 
Balnont - I la, ill 3 
Beverly - I la, 2a, 2c 

3, V la 
Billerloa - III 3 
Boston . I i« lb, lb , le, 2a, 
2c 1 , 2d, III 3, IV lb, V la, 
3, VI 1 
Bourne * III lb, 3 
Bralntrca - III 3, V la 
Bridpewnt r • HI 3 
Bristol County -IV U, 3 
Brockton - I la, 2c , 2d III 3, V la 
Brookline - III 3 
Burlington - HI 3 
Can, rid*a - I la. III Is, 3 
Canton - 111 3 
Charlton - III lb, IV lb 
Chatham - 111 3 
Chalaaxord - III 3 



111 lb. 



EXPENDITURES 



Capital 

&cp«ndlturaa 



700.22 
16,035.10 

1,212.78 



1,926.73 

.04,799.53 
1,329.15 

8,035.44 



4,1^.^ 

2,001.73 

325.53 



3eW 



1,630.00 
6,0U«65 
5,893.03 
4,276.00 
3,695.00 
63,218.16 

175,329.37 
2,893.30 

123,066.74 

5,113.80 

19,913.69 

126,123.80 

6,655.49 

4,856.66 

86,441.10 

165,545.20 
4,005.00 



2,190,372.2i, 

13,. 46.82 

13,145.25 

1,344.00 

4%1T>.04 

121,753.65 

37,143.48 

3.38&U43 

84,910.50 

5,222.00 

12,329.30 

1,888.21 

3,9 ».84 



Tuition end""" 
Traneportation 
(raid to other 
nchool district 



6,322.35 

230.47 

18,242.75 

3,293.20 

2,823.92 

21,754.56 

2,341.18 

16,447.58 
4,363.30 

141.60 

1,353.85 

18.535.68 

1,591.53 

1,332.31 

4,850.06 



6,298.10 

7,184.55 

15,968.46 

4,170.60 

5,771.48 
2,153.83 

12,299.74 
3,205.12 

4,556.43 
4,579.17 
4,579.17 

4,133.30 



Tscar 



8,002.35 
6,272.12 

24,135.73 
4,^76.00 
6,9^8.20 

63,918.38 
194,133.39 

24,653.36 
126,620.70 

21,561.38 

24,277.49 

128,192.13 

8,009.34 

23,392.34 

492,832.16 

163,206.66 
8,855.06 



: ,204,705.78 
20,431.37 
29,113.71 
5,514.60 
437,309.81 
129,526.66 
39,522.84 
15,681.17 
88,115.62 
9,778.i»3 
14,709.24 
6,^67.38 
o, ,4.64 



RECEIPTS 



income 

Received 

by schools 



82.00 

56.00 

805.X 

1,904.00 

228.00 

21,527.19 

33,785.32 

6,955.76 
503.00 
545.45 

12^33.48 

1,026.50 

320.00 

11,637.07 

23,769.75 
337.00 



224,774.14 

743.X 

3,975.00 

111..- 

73,850.00 

35,639.15 

3,683.30 

4,292.00 
294.00 
540.00 
300.00 

3,341.60 



State Ralabur&enent 
(Mat Maintenance, 
TuiUon, and 
Tranaport*ti jn ) 
Tabic 34 



3,960.18 

3,lft.06 

11,665.40 

1,186.00 

3,38u.l0 

20,845.49 

69,683.98 

12,326.68 

59,226.08 

10,529.20 

11,8 6.02 

54,894.86 

3,491.43 

11,982.72 

38,197.79 

71,553.88 
4,234.03 



985,948.12 

9,844.19 

12,569.36 

2,701,81 

179,664.52 

45,9*2.99 

17,807.01 

7,840.58 

41,911.81 

* 9 742.22 

7,U2.47 

3,Oi3.69 

2,346.53 



■foTaT" 

incoo* 



4,042.18 

3,164.06 

12,470.40 

3,090.00 

3,608.10 

42,372.68 

108,469.30 

12,326.68 

66,181.84 

11,03^.20 

12,411.47 

67,725.34 

4,517.93 

12,302.72 

49,8)4.66 

95,323.63 

4,6-1.03 



1,210,72236 
10,587.19 
16,544.36 
2,812.81 
253,514.52 
81,532.14 
21,490.31 



Net coat to 
Citiea, Towaa, 
Counties, and 
■agiona 



46,203.81 
5,036.22 
7,662.47 
3,333.69 
5,688.13 



3,960.17 

3,10b.06 

U, 665.38 

1,186.00 

3,380.10 

21,545.70 

85,719.09 

12,3*4.68 

60,438.86 

10,529.18 

11,866.02 

60,466.79 

3,491.41 

11,069.62 

442,997.30 

72,883.03 
4,234.03 



•§3,989.11 

9,8^4.18 
12,569.35 

2,701,79 
183,7^^.9 

47,944.72 
18.032.53 

7,*o;» 

41,911.81 

4,742.21 
7,026.77 

3,083.69 
2,346.51 



i 






»p e - I 1ft, 2c 1 , HI 3, 
f la 

Oeaeeni-Carllftle Re* - HI 3 
- Ill 3 

- I la, III lb, 3 
-111 3 

Reg* - I 1*, 



-HI 3 
-III 3 
- Ill lb, 3 
-III 3 
■tew • 111 3 
E>eeea - III lb, 3 
iMOt • HI 3 
sees Cownt* - I lb, 1U 3, 
If In, i, V la, fl 1 

..verett - 1 la, 111 la, 3 
PaU River - I la, lb, lb 1 , 3a 1 , 
III 1«, lb, 3, n 1, fll 1,2 
falawuth • III lb, 3 
Fltehburg - I 1«, U\ 2a, 2d, f 

Faatere - HI lb. 3 

rraamajhea - I la, la 1 , 2a 1 , TII 2 

Fraiklla - 111 3 

Frontier n, g , - HI 3 

OerRfter - 111 

■focestir - 1 lag |a {tin Mtnle 

ni 3 

OreeaflelR - 1 la, 2a 1 , 111 3 

:raal«n - KO ]e, , M lb 

Raaarer - III 3 

aawdch • 111 3 

Htvfrhlll • 1 la, 2a, 2a 1 , 2d, 

IU lb, 3 
»a.-:hr a - Hi 3 
felbreek - IU 3 
Ho yoke - 1 la, 2a, 2«1, d 

Redeea - 1H lb, 3 

■all - IU 3 

Kiag miip beg. - 1 u t aa 1 , 

2d, III lb, 3 
Lawrence - I 2a , 2c, IH 3, *l 1 
Lee - 111 lb 
Lena*. - IH 3 
1 — aa l ev r - I la, la 1 , 2a 1 , 21 

IU 3, ¥U i, 2 
Lexia r ?ton - HI 3 

"tViiA' rl 1 ! "• lu u - 

baeenbarg - IH 3 

*«*■- J **• !•• a* 1 , 2d, IH 3, 

VII 1, 2 

Wahar, Ralph C M Rag* - HI 3 
"•!*•» - l la, ael, 2d, f U, 3 



147*30 
95U44 






652.00 
1,137 .6)9 

14.270.76 



54*95 
277.00 
149.50 



5,376.24 



1>,0J1.^4 

2,347.71 



1,713.94 
94J.35 



7,597.19 

324.00 

V .... 
613.44 



1 V, . 
10,373.9? 

Ra»f ...0? 
661.00 

56,3*0.57 

540.20 
1,024.00 
6.044.38 
1,948.— 
2,534.90 
9,920.23 



700,979.84 
238,110.48 

•90,000.54 
6,248.56 

99,042.26 

13,767.23 

114,552.48 

3,502.42 

1,737.00 

7.255.13 

110,554.65 
129,586.27 

U,193.33 
3,361.00 
2,141.00 

396,922. 1 

2,857.00 

2,29% X? 

232,537*44 
7,177.72 
2,476.05 

79.959.93 

66, 55--. 56 

5.170.14 

705.00 

131,71 .29 
10,292.78 

ft <.,987.31 
1,884.10 

377.143.29 
2,518.73 



18,550.77 

6,1X04 

6,473.41 

606.04 



T*V3 

1,704.75 

2,392.40 

43,473.23 

,95 .»6 

2,151.95 



3.507.98 

466.80 
68.80 

11,036.64 
6,586.25 
3,567.37 
4,413.16 

14.H9.47 

3,865.10 

1,340.55 
8,791.79 
1,059.69 
5.562.52 

4,717.34 
9.838.66 
8,275.23 

7, 531.04 
6,796.78 
4.759.87 



18,629.19 

i.7^.55 

5.853.70 
7,172.91 

22,791.57 
3,636.40 

4.919.4 
13.598.15 



208,061.63 

10,373.93 

U,4**1.64 

35,?>4.76 

1,267.04 

57.332.01 

1,32 .43 

l,72ii.75 

8.436.78 

45.421.23 

24.439.16 

10.765.4* 

2,936.95 

701,631.84 
2*2,755.95 

304,738.10 
6,317.36 

110,133.65 

20,630.48 

118,269.35 

7,915.58 

1,787. 

21,37-60 

U9,7?5.99 

130.926.82 

19.985.12 

4.4^0.69 
TaltLafl 

4U.642.09 
12,695.66 
10,565.23 

242.416.19 

13,974.50 

7,235.92 

81,678.89 

6,1 .*, 
6,164.34 

2,504.55 

145.169.18 
17,665.69 

348,102.81 

5,521.20 

387,151.91 

2,51*. 73 



l.', 634.46 

2,299.00 

2.328.90 

471.35 



17,1*2.53 
540.20 

69.80 

*J2.>, 
223.00 
463.00 

a7.oo 

127.497.37 

21,752.50 
13,566.41 



6,140.72 

1,723*00 

22,879.39 

255.60 

1,457.00 
3,870.10 

5,053.60 
59,146.16 

1.419.00 
1,195.00 

,... , . 

114,6^2.25 

1,420,00 

75.60 

37,018.81 

300.00 

? . 

6,7*).63 
6,086.01 



21,297.56 
3,819.50 

34,426.04 

;70, 

42.746.12 

234.00 
lo,2..-.31 



94,213.59 
4,0^7.47 
4.576.37 

19.96^.06 
633.52 

19,5 9.02 
RR0OI 

l,^' . j 
4,183.49 
22,940.43 
12,461.36 
5.151.25 
1.444.98 

286.7lM.24 
109.932.99 

135.950.41 
3.15 .68 

51.969.11 
9.315.25 

47.620.23 

3.829.99 

165.00 

6,752.26 

54.6d3.09 

35.890.34 

9.459.15 

1,612.90 

3.690.26 

143.499.01 

5.637.83 

5,2m*.82 

101,524.15 
6,837. 

3,256.47 

35,589.56 

39,767.40 
3,082.17 
1,252.21 

51,137*22 
6,923.10 

146,676.45 
2,325.60 

16 ,658.32 
1,142.36 

49,605.^4 



H3,848*05 
6,336.47 
6,905*27 

20,439.41 
6j3*52 

36,781.55 

910.32 

1,364.38 

4.253*29 

23.222.43 

12,684.38 

5,614.^5 

1,491.98 

414,238.61 
131,665.49 

154.516.89 
3.158.68 

58,109.19 

U.038.25 
70,499.62 

4,085.59 

1,622.00 

12,622.36 

59,736.69 

95,036.50 

10r87«i.l> 

2,*>7.90 

4,014.26 

258,141.26 
7,057.83 
5,32^.42 

13., . 
T,137.25 
3,979.47 

44,370.39 

45.85J.U 
3,082.17 
1,252.11 

79,434.78 
10,742.60 

13l,I08W»9 
3,195.60 

21 ,404.44 

1, 76.36 

62,837.75 



370 



94.4l3.58 
4,037.46 
4,576.37 

15.U5.35 

6,3*52 

20,550.46 

390.U 
1,364.37 
4,183.49 
22,198.80 
H,804.78 
5,15U24 
1.444.97 

287.393*23 
Ul.070.46 

150,221.21 
3,1**68 

52,024.02 
9,592.23 

47,76^.73 
3,129.99 

165.00 
8,7> -.24 

60,059*30 

35,890.32 

9,106.97 

1.612.79 

3.690.^6 

II ,50 ^83 

5.637.13 
5,2**.81 

113,872.53 
6,837.^5 
3,2^6.45 

37,308.50 

*,.-76.7* 
3.082.17 
1.2>-.27 

65.734.40 
6.923*09 

167.000.39 
2,325.60 

174,747.47 
1,14*.37 

50,~Li.b4 



371 



t r • III 3 

Marliore • I la, 2c*, 2u, 

111 I, 2 
Itamhfleld - XIX 1* 

- X la, 2e*, 2a, UI 



J, t la, VII X, 2 

ft Itom - in 3 

Rlt.UN - III 3 
B*sl oro - III | 
WLUord - in 3 
Willi* - III 3 
Hilton - XXX 3 
n» - III 3 
itwefcat • I 1* 

IMtt Me* ■ III lb, 3, 
XV lb. 3 . 

lav «4ford • I la, 2*>, UI 
la, 3, m 1, 2 
Nowturrpart - III Xb 
bv Salon • I la. Ill la, IV 

•nvto - : u, ,», 1*6* . I, 

iii 3, vu i 

roUr Count/ • XV la, 3 
law - IU lb, 3 
North Ada** • MaCaui - I la, 

us ais »x x 

forthanpton • I la, 2c 1 , 

UI la, 3, IV la. VI I 
Worth Attlfrt oro - UI 3 
North* rid, a • I la, la*, IU 

lb, 3 
Borth trookflald • III lb, XV 

lb 

Horth loading • III 3 
NorwaU • III 3 
Norwood • I lb, IU 3, U 1 
Old ftoehaater lac • III 3 
Palawr - III lb, 3 
•aatody - I la, V la 
Planoar Valla/ a* t . - HI 3, 

If Xb 
Pittaflald - I la, 2a, 2t* # 

2d, UI lb, 3, V la, 3, VI 1, 

VII 1, 2 
; Igraoath • III 3 
Prorlneetovn • X la. fn*, 

IU lb, 3 



, .1? 
2,265.0b 



MU 3 



**•*• I 
778.23 

1,257.92 

9,301.22 

9,3-' .v 



3,667.63 
!2,2U».72 

72.59 



1*863.51 

lii6.32 

191.35 
2,11*5.29 



l,6hft.J0 

96*68: . 

I0,95b.53 

160*595.05 

1**356.50 

5.6*5.81, 

1*0 5.27 

1**639.78 

1,125.00 

5*57«.10 

2,i*U».75 

29,OOl*.hO 

2S,3ii2.36* 

S91,187.2» 
16,8 9.6* 

82,706.17 

|*&.17 

508,617.03 

lii,8$0.30 

330,827.09 

316,378.67 

3*1*77.92 

H ,08fUi 

7,116.78 

l»,515.oO 

1,515.-0 

138,823.00 

2,060.00 
12,136.72 
6f*051t.67 

•,738.98 



326,098.97 
2,U30^0 

25*626.95 



h 



125.10 

6,550.23 
3,tli.08 

*,181.0* 
11,113.21 
1 f - . 
U.,31.3.63 

6,221.68 
716.10 

M60.37 

6^28.30 



l*.56t.%0 
6,1*31.90 

538.50 

1,592.55 



9,836.08 
7,918.96 

10*6*8.71 

1*.2*9.13 

6,1*56.11 

609.30 

2,725.37 

15*560.69 
2.556.91* 



» • 

:..,'v>..l- 



1,773.20 
1> ,139.1*1 

267, 2*1.17 
15,*69.71 
2h,527.78 
15,399.10 
U.Q61.*6 

1.6*1.10 
12,038 M 

6*6*3.05 
29*00*.1»0 

25,657.01 

613,655.1.5 
21t,019.77 

8b,502.5i> 

336,21*9.91. 

517,923.05 

lii,850.30 

•0**l*9lt.72 

3*6**29.*7 
11,396.68 

31,510.72 

11,3*5.91 
10,371.11 

2,3?U30 
113,1*11.68 

2,060. 
27,719.1*1 
!:?,7 7.93 

,73 .y 



329,28h.57 
7»*3S.70 

27*97*.2* 



nOO.uo 
39,000.95 



1*3,110.8% 

1,2 5.00 

166,00 



2W.00 
1,507.00 

751.1*0 
3,? 2.10 

6,561.57 

137*6*1.67 
5,012.67 

61,981.78 

-58,372,15 
90,107.1*3 
1,261.63 

11*3,677.89 

131,031.12 

219.1*0 

690.73 

2,767.02 
1,196.25 

617.36 
1*9,750.11* 

U3.00 

6,273.69 
207.20 



36,027.11 
1*26.00 

2,539.57 



32*11605 

6,693.31 

110,8 3?.65 
7,102.36 
12,170. 9 
7,667.56 
5,310.71* 
7 '8.05 
5,265.71* 
l*,0l*5.81i 
12,661.15 

10,9*7.89 

219»O5*.10 
9*U*.Ui 

10.6*1.1*5 

131*, 288. 29 
209,251*.8O 
6*79*.33 

93**7*«6* 

97.591.81, 
1*,758J*7 

17.023.71 

6,096.31 

**t87.*b 

853.W 

1*5,899.12 

973.SC 

13*059.71 

39,668.96 

!*,602.22 



11*5*533.06 

3,5<*».85 

11,614.69 



1,116.60 

71,U7.10 
6*6v3.31 

153,9U3.1i9 
6,367.36 

12,356.89 
7,731.56 
5,750.71. 
1,01*3.05 
6,772.71. 
li,797.21» 

16,1*3.25 

17*529.*6 

j66*69So71 
U.,127.11 

72,563.23 

l§2,669 y, 

? • .362.23 
6,055.96 

237,35?.50 

tit ,622.96 
*,977.87 

17,711*^*1* 

8*863.33 

6*083.69 

1*1*70.81* 

95*61*9.26 

1,086.50 

13*059.71 

1*7*91*2^5 

**809.*2 



183,560.19 
3,930.65 

lz*,181».26 



59*022.31 
6*693.30 

113,097.66 

7,102.35 

12,170.«9 

7,667.51* 

5,310.72 

79" rf* 

5*165.73 

l»,0t*5.8l 

12,66105 

6*117.55 

2*6,959.68 
9*696.66 

11,939.36 

U.3.589.SO 

218,560.82 

6,79t*.3* 

167,11*2.22 

119,806.51 
6*109.01 

17*096.26 

2*502.56 

1».887.*2 

85306 

1.7,762.62 

973.50 

ll*,659.70 

39,615.26 

3,929.56 



11*5,72*4.38 
3,5 Jt.85 

13,789.98 



Quincy - I la, 2c 1 , 2d, III 3, 

? la, VII 2 
Randolph • I la. III 3 
Beading • III 3 
Rahoboth - III 3 
Revere - III 3 
Rockland - III 3 
Sales - I la, 2c 1 , III lb, 3, 

¥ la 
Saugus - Ill lb, 3* V la 
Seituate - III lb, 3 
Shelburne - III 3, IV lb 
Silver Lake Reg. - I la, III lb, 

3, IV lb, VI 1 
Soaereet - III 3 
•ewrrille - I la, 2c 1 , III lb, 

3, V la, VI 2 
Southbrid^e - I la, 2a, 2c 1 , 

111 3 

South Hadley - III 3 
South Shore - I la, 2c 1 , VII 1, 2 J 
Spencer - III 3 
Springfield - I la, lb, lb 1 , 2a, 

2c 1 , 2c2, 2d, III la, 3, 

V la, VI 1, 2, VII 1, 2 
Stockbrid L e - IV lb 
Stoughton - III 3 
Svaapecott - III 3 
Svaneea - I la. III 3 
Taunton - I la, 2c 1 , 2d, III 3, 

VI 1 

Tewkabury - III lb, 3 

Truro - 111 3 

Wachuaett teg. - III lb, IV lb, 3 

Wakefield - III 3 

Waltham - I la, la 1 , 2c 1 , III 3, 

V la, VII 2 
Ware - III 3 

Warehaa - I la. III lb, 3 
Webater - I la, 2c 1 , III 3 

ell eley - III 3 
Meat Brldgcvater - III lb, 3 
Weatfield - I la, la 1 , 2a, 2c 1 , 

in 3, VII 2 
fceatport - III lb, 3, IV lb, 3 
west Springfield - III 3 
Weeteood - III 3 
Weyaouth - I la, 2c 1 , 2d, III 3, 

V la, VII 1 
whitnan-danaon Reg. - III 3 
Wilmington - III 3 
Winchondon - III lb, 3 
Woburn - III 3 



2 

7,U55.U9 



10,672.20 
221.97 

1,0^2.00 



5,U62.1U 
7,6U0.1U 

U5.OlU.23 

3U,600.73 



103.28 
1,0137.96 

12,260.62 

238.93 

661.70 

2,096.68 
9,189.96 



28U,8U5.17 

27,2UU.5U 

U,2U2.00 

821.25 

2,383.00 

3,630.07 

109,276.56 

19,015.06 

7.0U2.12 

7,501.79 

73,0U9.h9 
3,578.56 

237,710.80 

121,512.18 
2,305.18 

252,li78.25 
1,223.00 



I,103,3u5.u3 

8,680.68 

2,985.73 

2,636.00 

15,959.66 

98,81^.1,6 

8,391.83 

U70.00 

228,899.91 

6,200.42 

239,636.13 

975.00 

26,962.81 

6U,U59.1U 

9,711.39 

ll,30fc.81t 

268,650.66 

12,760.37 
3,1*15.39 
5,315.00 

259,735.61 

U,2U3.00 

3,7U5.10 

15,181».70 

7,275.60 






12,568.1i7 

12,672.89 

5,011.35 

680.99 

23.51U.U8 

1.915.8U 

2,95U.U1 
9,250.23 
2,013.00 
2.778.U7 



1,906.10 
8,306.77 

3,306.89 

22,170.86 

17,150.07 



253.00 

17,367.37 

2,028.13 

1,522.95 

l,059.«O 

11,369.75 

2,058.90 

10,657.10 

3,602.8U 
17,915.30 

1,36U.52 
11,U67.Q5 

3,OU9.95 

6,091.12 

13,360.U7 

6,531.97 

20,261.78 

738.52 

10,057.19 

6,787.37 

6,183.07 

13,770.97 



30U,869.13 

39,917.U3 

$.253.35 

1,502.23 

25.097.U8 

5,5U5.91 

122,903.17 

28,U67.26 

9,055.12 

11,332.26 

73,OU9.U9 
5,U8U.66 

251,U99.71 

135,U59.21 

2U,U76.0U 

297,U92.U8 

18,373.07 



1,137,9U6.16 

9,133.68 

20,353.10 

U,66U.13 
17.U82.61 

100.007.1U 

19,761.56 

2,526.90 

23,987.87 

17,057.72 

255,1*99.59 
18,890.30 
26,566.26 
76,787.89 
12.76l.3U 
17,395.96 

28U,107.81 

19.292.3U 

23,677.17 

6,063.52 

278,982.76 

U,2U3.00 

10,532.U7 

21,367.77 

2I,OU6.57 



38,773.80 

PlU.05 

1.092.0* 

50.00 

300.00 

199.00 

7,676.65 

5,253.00 

189.00 

6,2U6.50 

6.6U8.65 
31.80 

1U,91U.0U 

6,602.75 

1,360.00 

86,755.51 

U15.50 



309,609.3U 

7,3U7.29 

U69.UO 

1,092.00 

1,057.20 

2U,776.0O 
23U.OO 

U,562.00 
l,95U.OO 

30,112.7U 

975.00 

1,780.76 

16,207.66 

5,U02.O0 
1,076.50 

20,760.22 

732.00 

1,031.00 

562.00 

U7,606.12 

738.00 

195.00 

3,677.28 

U72.50 



i29.319.92 
20,577.08 

U,?i3.n 

872.72 

13.U56.6U 

2.730.61 

52,277.17 

11,506.15 

U,U33.06 

U.350.77 

31,295.98 
2,726.U3 

115,5i»1.78 

60.608.18 
11.5U8.02 

82.e6l.37 
8,978.78 



396,668.13 

U.373.16 

10,255.13 

1,786.07 

8,212.7? 

37.562.9U 
9,763.60 

1.26U.1.5 
9.7UU.52 
7,551.86 

106,563.15 

9,265.66 

13.31U.9U 

30,2U3.56 

3,679.68 

8,159.73 

130,625.U6 

9,6UU.98 

11,323.09 

2,760.76 

111,092.35 

1,752.50 

5.160.7U 

8,8U5.25 

10,267.0U 



168,093.72 
21,1,11.13 

5,605.51 

922.72 

13,756.6U 

2,929.61 

59,953.82 

16,759.15 

U,622.06 

10,597.27 

37.9UU.63 
2,758.23 

130,U65.82 

67,210.93 

12,928.02 

169,616.86 

9,39U.28 



706,U77.U7 

11,720.U5 

10.7UU.53 

2,878.07 

9,269/92 

62,3U0.9U 
9,997.80 
1,26U.U5 

1U.306.52 
9,505.86 

136,675.89 

10,2U0.66 

15,095.70 

U6,U51.2U 

9,081.68 

9,236.23 

151,385.68 

10,376.98 

12,35U.09 

3,322.76 

158,700.U7 

2.U90.50 

5,363.7U 

12,522.53 

10,759.5U 



372 



136,775.U1 

18,506.30 

3,UU7.8U 

579.51 

12,1U0.6U 

2,616.30 

62,9U9.35 

11,728.11 

U,U33.06 

73U.99 

35.10U.86 
2.726.U3 

121,033.89 

68,21,8.28 

11,5U8.02 

127,875.60 

8,978.79 



U31.U68.69 
2,586.77 
9,608.57 
1,786.06 
8,212.69 

37,666.20 
9,763.78 
1,26U.U5 
9,681.35 
7,551.86 

118,823.70 

6,6U9.6U 

13.U70.56 

30,336.65 

3,679/66 

8.1 9.73 

132,722.13 

8,915.36 

11.323.08 

2,760.76 

120,282.29 

1,752.50 

5,168.73 

6,8U5.2U 

10,2^7.03 



ur • 1 1«, lb, ?«*, M* 
III U, 3. 19 lb, vx l # 
711 1, 2 

• III 3 



Kl 



c«*t to pl«c«a p«ylac tuittoo 
aad ta» tr«aar«rtatlon f or. 



T'JTU. - All 



TOTAL* 



I I6k,277,52 
962,61*6.39 



9*2,6*6. *9 



, ,-'-.: 



l,227.76?.0l| 
3,S?1.51 



1>. 



UU9.S0 
3,bb6.1& 

y?U,ffej.*3 
L,i3b,« . ■ 



i5,3x>,t9Ubt 
3io,us*oe 



,700,703.50 



2,0Sf ,265.26 




3i9,ieo.b* 

6*0.30 



17,277,321.0b 



l,i3b,bO2.03 



1 , , . 



3l0,Ut«0t 



I,S6b,?93.56 



UMbf«* 



2,«9,2S$.«* 15,7^,635.15 1 J,0o9,2i, J.02 



liS6.30U.27 
3.13S.67 



2,664,793.561 6,777,16l.L5 



575,J6$.36 



776,26b*! 

3, ts.n| 

•,606,955.01 



575,3"S.36 



• VfcM* 



' . . 



6lb,20?.30 
3,X39.7f 

9,671.162.80 

2.556.770 



I 9,.U. 1 



7,297 ,5b6.£l l^ie«,)UO,37 7,279*966.70 



125, 



10,366,739.63 1 7,JSS HS.32 



373 



374 



Table No. 3A - Tabulation of State Reimbursement for Vocational Education 

for Maintenance , Tuition, and Transportation for the 
Year Ending June 30, 1961*. 



School 



City, Town, 
County or Region 



Maintenance 



Tuition Transportation 



Total 



Abington 

Acton 

Acushnet 

Adams 

Agavam 

Alford 

Jtraesbury 

Amherst 

Amherst-Pelham Regional 

Andover 

Apponequet Regional 

Arlington 

Ashburnham 

Ashby 

Ashfield 

Ashland 

Athol 

Attleboro 

Auburn 

Avon 

Ayer 

Barnstable 

Barre 

Becket 

Bedford 

Belchertown 

Bellingham 

Belmont 

Berkley 

Berlin 

Bernardston 

Beverly 

Billerica 

Blackstone 

Blandford 

Bolton 

Boston 

Bourne 

Boxboro 

Boxford 

Boylstom 

Brain tree 

Brewster 

Bridgewater 

Brimfield 



799.00 



2,992.82 
2,5W*.02 



1,186.00 
1,733.50 

20,81*5.1*9 
68,272.02 



l,l*li9.1*0 

58,055.1*9 
2,305.1*0 
9,68U.12 

51*, 821.06 



2,8ll*.50 
2,268.33 

37,1*02.02 



70,887.72 
1,809.00 



982,799.06 
6,251.91 



l*,585.13 
616.50 



2,669.85 

677.63 

23,953.85 

115. 21* 

8,182.50 

10,960.72 
3,726.91* 

1,31*5.73 

1,370,1a 
369 # 90 
60b.76 

2,662.61 

2,122.75 
5,81*5.98 

690.60 
7,113.18 
1,837.65 

258.50 

70.80 

2,865.71 

103.88 

51*5.73 

6,951.87 

81*2.70 

795.77 

3,21*9.68 

1,1*91*. 38 

773.13 
616.88 

2,075.53 

1,079.26 

3,323.22 

262.98 

2,713.63 

2,U38.67 

289.00 

681.50 

1,778.59 

7,123.95 
309.90 

1,600.78 
1*05.29 



U91.33 

152.87 

7,329.38 

638.68 

1,91*5.58 
77U.23 

300.87 

Tl.55 
76.00 

133.55 

921*.50 

620.26 

5,031.30 

1*79.99 
810.62 

3i*l*.25 



1,391*. 25 
52.50 

131,20 
2,762.52 

228.10 

593.08 

1,263.80 

397.85 

1*9.28 

31*9.50 

566.55 

2,188.30 

78.00 

1*35.1*3 
1,153.61 

198.25 
160.1*0 
573.08 
860.28 

U81.53 
8l*.50 



3,960.18 

830.50 

31,283.23 

3,108.06 
11,665.1*0 

12,926.30 

1*,501.17 

1,186.00 

3,380.10 

20,31*5.U9 

69,683.98 

1*1*5.90 

738.31 

3,587.11* 

2,71*3.01 

12,326.68 

59,226.08 

10,529.20 

11,866.02 

258.50 

5U,89l*.86 

1*,259.96 

156.38 

3,1*91.1*3 

11,982.72 

1,070.80 

38,197.79 

3,81*2.76 

2,758.18 

1,170.98 

71,553.88 

l*,23l*.03 

1,61*5.81 

5,511.52 

31*0.98 

985,91*8.12 

9,81^.19 

1*87.25 

8la.90 

2,351.67 

12,569.36 

309.90 

2,701.81 

1*89.79 



;75 



City, Town, 
County or Region 



Maintenance Tuition Transportation 



Total 



Bristol County 

Brockton 

Brookfield 

Brookline 

Buckland 

Burlington 

Cambridge 

Canton 

Carlisle 

Carver 

Charlemont 

Charlton 

Chatham 

Chelmsford 

Chelsea 

Cheshire 

Chester 

Chesterfield 

Chicopee 

Chilmark 

Clarksburg 

Clinton 

Cohasset 

Colrain 

Concord 

Concord-Carlisle Regional 

Conway 

Cum.^ington 

Dal ton 

Danvers 

Dartmouth 

Dedham 

Deerfield 

Dennis 

Dighton 

Dighton-Rehoboth Regional 

Douglas 

Dover 

Dracut 

Dudley 

Dunstable 

Duxbury 

East Bridgewater 

East Brookfield 

Eastham 

Easthampton 

East Longmeadow 

Easton 

Edgartown 

Egremont 

Erving 

Essex 



179,661.52 
1*3,057.25 

16,730.09 

1,690,71 

1*0,309.2$ 

2,L*6k.OO 



5,952.50 
791*. 10 
279.62 



81,938.20 



i*,037.i*7 



1,1*80,55 
1M31.35 



330.50 
19,599.02 

512.00 



2,987.29 



833.00 

1,155.95 
1*,732.62 



369.00 



2,631,61 

1,820.39 

1,013.19 

2,37U.15 

5,278.77 

1,3U9.86 

1,606.22 

86.25 

3,695.65 

716.33 

995.02 

1,158.31 

1,7B1.53 
11,181*.00 

3,31*6.57 
1,1*01.71 
2,721.52 
8,963.1*0 

189.73 
li, 607.U* 

328.30 
1,900.65 

300.85 

2,1*19.36 
1,1*61.81 

702.25 
2,861.32 
1*,250.23 
8,930.97 
1,768.23 

360.00 

210.89 

31*7.87 

51*5.75 

2,372.13 

10,669.56 

13.20 

1,018.00 

1,658.01 

1,751.^5 
1*96.10 

17,91*0.71* 

9,677.52 

352.38 



1,862.68 
1,075.98 



251* .10 

1,807.91 

63.73 

871.10 
252.70 
672.00 

3,087.50 

251*.5o 

19U.95 

1,131.25 

285.38 

706.1*0 

781.67 

1,228.50 

1,853.50 

311.99 



1,106.95 
83.50 

66.07 

1,588.16 
922.00 
122.1*0 
231*. 50 

1,1*86.1*8 

2,301.95 
569.02 

92.13 

1*2.25 
306.63 
116.13 
816.79 

178.20 

31*2.00 

1*70.80 

658.00 

U,l66.^ 

1,627.91 

66.^5 



61*2.00 



179,66li.52 

1*5,91*2.99 

3,628.30 

17,807.01 

2,37U.15 
7,81*0.58 

1*1,911.81 
l*,7l*2.22 
86.25 
6,783,15 
970.83 
7,11*2.1*7 
3,083.69 
2,31*6.53 

11,890.1*0 
1*, 128.21* 
2,630.21 
1,575.02 

9l*,213.59 

189.73 
5,7Hu39 

1*11.80 
1,900.65 

366.92 
1*,037.1*7 
1*,007.52 
2,383.81 

82U.65 

1,576.37 

19,968.06 

11,232.92 

2,337.25 

360.00 

633.52 

19,599.02 

390.12 

l,36l*.38 

2,1*88.26 

11,1*86.35 
13.20 

1* ,183 .1*9 
2,000.01 
2,22iw85 
1,151*. 10 
22,9h0j*3 
12,161.38 
5,151.25 



2,50L.68 
1,U*1*.98 



37ft 



City, Town, 
County or Region 



Maintenance 



Tuition Transportation 



Essex County 

Everett 

Fair haven 

Fall River 

Falmouth 

Fitchburg 

Florida 

Foxboro 

Framingham 

Franklin 

Freetown 

Frontier Regional 

Gardner 

Gay Head 

Georgetown 

Gill 

Gloucester 

Goshen 

Gosnold 
rafton 

Granby 

Granville 

Great Barrington 

Greenfield 

Groton 

Groveland 

Hadley 

Halifax 

Hamilton 

Hampden 

Hancock 

Hanover 

Hanson 

Hardwicic 

Harvard 

Harwich 

Hatfield 

Haverhill 

Hawley 

Heath 

Kingham 

Kinsdale 

Kolbrook 

Holden 

Holland 

Holliston 

Holyoke 

Hopedale 

Hopkinton 

Hubbardston 

Hudson 

Hull 

Huntington 



286,71*1.21* 
108,179.00 

135,717.08 

3,12i*.28 

1*6,1*50.78 

6,022.12 

1*5,836.51 

1,623,11 

165.00 
1,692.52 



52,750.51 



35,220.06 
5,063.25 



1,033.00 

909.00 
11*1,11*0.31 

718.50 
1,107.20 

97,759.33 



3,138.86 
876.53 



1,681.39 
Jii,132.6l 

233.10 

3k. 10 

1*, 252 .06 

21*9.29 
2,195.01 
1,603.10* 
1,873.19 

1*37.76 

l*,530.I*l* 

2,750.96 
1*23.18 

1,51*9.77 
1,212.25 

9,170.52 
1,857.60 
1,900.88 

2,809.97 
526.10 
170.1*0 

1,891.35 

3,918.85 
283.60 
506.1*2 

3,730.01; 
2; 5.00 
353.18 

2,631.07 
1,521.18 

61.75 

1,662.51 

3,638.59 

1,1*19.30 

U52.63 

1*37.60 

3,889.95 

333.1*5 
3,582.72 

2,656.1*3 

520.50 

61*2.70 

3,1*91.82 

2,151.66 

2,361.55 
777.80 

2,669.99 
1,968.21* 

3,097.71 



72.60 
935.67 



1,266.27 

1,096.09 

180.25 
333.39 
560.88 

2,1*79.30 

51*3.68 

382.78 
678.08 

1,616.83 
169.18 
517.69 

1,1*19.93 
11*1*. 18 

33.25 
62.50 

1*77.05 

1*3.75 
225.03 

73.60 
171.72 

1,351.73 
526.50 
183.00 

1,118.75 
633.50 
939.37 
170.00 
308.70 

1,029.38 
87.20 
551*. 90 
232.1*3 
157.00 
56.88 
273.70 
51*2.25 
611*. 65 

2,01*3.30 
728.1*0 
1*11.70 

3,017.11 



Total 

286,71*1.21* 

109,932.99 

15,068.31 

135,950.1*8 

3,158.68 

51,969.11 

21*9.29 

9,315.25 

1*7,620.23 

3,829.99 
998.61* 

165.00 

8,752.26 

3, 291* .61* 

1*23.18 

51*, 683. 09 

1,890.33 



11,087.35 
2,026,78 

2,1*18.57 

i*,229.90 

35,890.31* 

203.65 
1,953.65 
9,1*59.15 

233.60 

550.17 
:,955.07 

298.60 
1,612,90 
3,982.80 
2,Oh7.98 

21*7.75 
3,690.26 

1*,322.09 

11*3,1*99.01 

622.63 

71*6.30 

5,637.83 

1*20.65 

5,2l»l*,82 

2,888.86 

677.50 

699.58 

101,521*. 85 

2,693.91 

2,976.20 

2,821.10 

6,337.25 

3,256.1*7 

6,111*. 82 



. 37 



City, Town, 










County or Region 


Maintenance Tuition 


transportation 


Total 


Ipswich 


„„„- 


1,309.20 


205.88 


1,515.08 


King Philip Regional 


35,569.56 


— 


mm> 


35,589.56 


Kingston 


~ 


70.85 


mm 


70.85 


L&keville 


— — 


I1V6.O8 


318.00 


79k .08 


Lancaster 


~ 


1,623.01 


1,L?6.78 


3,119.79 


Lanesboro 


mmm 


1,859.1*0 


551.93 


2,1*11.33 


Lawrence 


30,233.1*3 


8,057.22 


1,1*76.75 


39,767.1*0 


Lee 


2,585.07 


366.65 


110.15 


3,062.17 


Leicester 


mmm 


5,126.38 


h«9.25 


5,916.13 


Lenox 


352.50 


51*0.20 


359.58 


1,252.28 


Leominster 


55,210.37 


2,6314.35 


292.50 


58,137.22 


Leverett 


—— 


1>522.39 


1,191.60 


2,713.99 


Lexington 


3,236.6U 


3,058.58 


627.38 


6,923.10 


Leyden 


~ 


200,00 


89.00 


9.00 


Lincoln 


— 


78.00 


mmm 


78.00 


Littleton 


™ 


533.32 


151.73 


685.55 


Longmeadow 


— 


3,582.28 


1*50^5 


J*, 032. 73 


Lowell 


U*5, 280.66 


1,011.1*9 


381*. 30 


lL-6,676.ii$ 


Ludlow 


— 


23,79l*.86 


3,31*0.50 


27,135.36 


Lunenburg 


507 # 1;0 


1,170.25 


61-7.95 


2,325.60 


l&rm 


167,198.61 


1,973.21 


u86.50 


169,65B.32 


Iornnfield 


~— 


891*. 03 


78.50 


97?.53 


Mahar, Ralph C, Regional 


l,ll»2.36 


_ 


— - 


1,1142.36 


Maiden 


1*2, 606.36 


6,300.97 


I4l8.ll 


1*9,605.1*1* 


Manchester 


59U.Q5 


62.55 


™ 


656.60 


Mansfield 


wmm 


2,?'.-3.1*2 


71*1.25 


3,681. .67 


Marblehead 


_ 


1,185.30 


mm 


1,185.30 


Marion 


_ 


2,791.70 


1,177.27 


3,968.97 


Marlboro 


28,81.1.03 


2,11*7.06 


1,128,06 


32,116.15 


Marshfield 


5,lol*.27 


l,H6.51* 


363.50 


,693.31 


Mashpee 


MM 


31.13 


... 


31.13 


Mattapoisett 


— 


2,205.25 


51*3.08 


2,828,33 


Maynard 


mm 


752.50 


507.50 


1,260.00 


Medfield 


mmm 


596*60 


183.63 


780.23 


Medford 


108,7l»2.12 


2,025.73 


6h.80 


110,832.65 


Medway 


mmm 


850.09 


126.16 


976.25 


Melrose 


l,51i5.75 


5,276.82 


279.79 


7,102.36 


Mendon 


_ 


519.11 


T0.66 


659 77 


Merrlmac 


— - 


1,800*98 


198.10 


1,999.08 


Methuen 


2,629.92 


7,561; .77 


1,776.20 


12,170.t9 


Middleboro 


krtjk 


5,253Jb6 


1,918.1*6 


7,667.56 


Middle field 


wa 


mmm 


mm 


mmm 


Middleton 


•M 


80.1*0 


mm 


80.1*0 


Milford 


2,199.89 


2,51*5.17 


565.68 


5,310.71* 


Millbury 


— 


8,159.09 


978.72 


9,137.81 


Millis 


U<0.00 


317.80 


1(0.25 


793,05 


Killville 


_ 


l,19l*.5l 


1*U*.70 


1,609.21* 


Milton 


2,035.55 


3,103.66 


126.53 


5,265.71* 


Monson 


— • 


3,?3?.36 


1,000.00 


1*,?3?.36 


Montague 


831.68 


2, 05!;. 62 


1,159.51* 


ii,Ol*5.31* 


Monterey 


— — 


«• 


— . 


Ma 


Montgomery 


-— 


i*75.~ 


165.00 


6I4O.OO 



* >.- 



S78 



City, Tcwn, 










County or Region 


Maintenance Tuition 


Transportation 


Total 


Nahant 


„u, m 


1,197.140 


51.63 


l,2li9.03 


Nantucket 


12,861.15 


mmm 


_ 


12,861.15 


Narragansett Regional 


10,917.89 


mmm 


— 


10,91*7.89 


Natiek 


— - 


li,391.79 


710,68 


5,102.1*7 


Needham 


•MM. 


7,3H*.75 


1,820.1*5 


9,135.20 


New Ashford 


— 


•M— 


mmm 


mmm 


New Bedford 


226,772.90 


1,26)4.0 


1,016.60 


229,051.10 


t\e\i Braintree 


•M 


71 . 


257.63 


1,006.52 


Newbury 


— 


1,7614.39 


155.85 


1,920.21 


Nevburyport 


5,898.1 4 9 


2,1*58.25 


757.70 


9,11)4.10* 


New Marlboro 


™ 


Dwl*0 


— 


Hi .1*0 


New Sal cm 


10,1*12.20 


127.00 


1142.25 


10,681.1*5 


Newton 


133,192.01 


787.50 


8.78 


13)4,268.29 


Norfolk 


_ 


1*83.63 


115.20 


598.83 


Norfolk County 


209,2^1.80 


+M 


~ 


209,251.80 


rlorth Adams 


6, 791*. 33 


— 


— 


6,791.33 


Northampton 


92,673.79 


3,860.1*6 


1,057.59 


97,591.81* 


North Andovui* 


— —■» 


1,5U5.58 


W2#2$ 


1,997.87 


North Attleboro 


1,629.26 


2,1*81.39 


6I47.82 


U, 758 .1*7 


Northboro 


•M 


3,03h.25 


633.85 


3,668.10 


Northbridge 


11,699.35 


U,005.36 


1,319.00 


17,023.71 


North Brookfield 


3,971.7)4 


1,267.5? 


857.00 


6,096.31 


Northern Berkshire Regional 93,h7lu6l 


MM 


_ 


93,1*71* .61 


Northfield 


-«- 


6U2.08 


325.00 


967.08 


North Reading 


1,659,38 


2,893.91 


331.15 


14,887.1*1* 


Norton 


— 


1,818.13 


31*6.20 


2,16U.33 


Norwell 


1*1*8.81 


296.65 


108.00 


853.1*6 


Norwood 


Ui,536.l3 


1,200.09 


162.60 


1*5,899.12 


Oak Bluffs 


_ 


mmm 


•HIM. 


mmm 


Oakham 


mmm 


375.90 


33.75 


1*09.65 


Old Rochester Regional 


973.50 


mmm 


™ 


973.50 


Orange 


— 


13,173.68 


6,210.10 


19,68)4.08 


Orleans 


-— 


226.75 


595.00 


821.75 


Oti« 


_ 


156.81 


153.00 


309.81 


Oxford 


mmm 


U,397.66 


1,002.60 


5,1400.26 


Palmer 


6,069.36 


6,510.35 


1,250.00 


13,859.71 


Paxton 


™ 


1,117.73 


1*21.00 


1,84*1.73 


Peabody 


38,390.149 


1,261.97 


16.50 


39,668.96 


Pelham 


mmm 


719.66 


1)49.18 


868.81* 


Pembroke 


mm 


969.35 


126.25 


1,095.60 


Pepperell 


mmm 


28.05 


mmm 


28.05 


Peru 


mmm 


•»* 


mmm 


mmm 


Petersham 


mmm 


2,509.50 


1,981.75 


1*,)491.25 


Phillipston 


mmm 


633.U5 


2148.00 


88l.)45 


Pioneer Valley Regional 


i*,602.22 


mmm 


— 


14,602.22 


Pittsfield 


ll*l*,035.95 


1,01*9.63 


14U7.50 


115,533.08 


Plainfield 


mmim 


101.75 


51*. 18 


155.93 


Plainsville 


mmm 


i«« 


— 


mmm 


Plymouth 


1,002.30 


1,957.30 


5)45.25 


3,5014.85 


Plympton 


— 


7^4.65 


123.00 


197.65 


Princeton 


mmm 


339.61* 


138.50 


528. Ik 


Provincetown 


ll,6Ui.69 





_ 


Il,6l4l4.69 



379 



Cit7, Town, 










'County or Region 


Maintenance Tuition 


Transportation 


Total 


Quincy 


123,035.68 


i*,99l*.79 


1,289.1*5 


129,319.92 


Randolph 


13,205.25 


6,336 MS 


1,035.38 


20,577.08 


Raynhaa 


-- ~ 


1,818.33 


36.18 


l,881*.8l 


Reading 


1,575.00 


2,505.68 


632.83 


1*, 713. 51 


Rehoboth 


385.63 


31*0.1*9 


11*6.60 


872.72 


Revere 


1,01*1.50 


11,757 .2U 


657.90 


13,1*56.61* 


Richmond 


mm 


3,693.38 


™ 


3,693.38 


Rochester 


mm 


3,076.56 


3,508.03 


6,581*.59 


Rockland 


1,715.51 


957.92 


57.15 


2,730.61 


Rockport 


■M 


1,079.00 


372.76 


1,1*51.76 


Rove 


mm 


25.80 


mm 


25.80 


Rowley 


™ 


2, 550.82 


763.00 


3,313.82 


Royal3ton 


mm 


368.09 


112.75 


1*80.81* 


Russell 


— - 


l*,2l8.Ui 


l,281i.h5 


5,502.59 


Rutland 


mm 


1,853.79 


61x7.00 


2,500.79 


Sales 


$0,799.96 


1,205.22 


271.99 


52,277.17 


Salisbury 


mm 


3,603.98 


635.95 


t*,239.93 


Sandisfield 


mm 


22.00 


mm 


22.00 


Sandwich 


— 


130.65 


72.00 


202.65 


Saugus 


6,881.03 


3,81*7.31* 


777.78 


11,506.15 


Savoy 


mm 


mtm 


mm 


mm 


Scituate 


3,1*26,56 


925.50 


81.00 


1*,1*33.06 


Seekonk 


mm 


2)j5.82 


mm 


21*5.82 


Sharon 


mm 


1,279.1*9 


li90.20 


1,769.69 


Sheffield 


mm 


77.00 


mm 


77.00 


Shelburo© 


2,961.53 


1,389.21* 


—- 


1*,350.77 


Sherborn 


■M 


793.1*0 


139.00 


932.1*0 


Shirley 


tM 


1,511.25 


893.00 


2,l*Ol,.25 


Shrewsbury 


*M 


8,09U.23 


577.20 


8,671.1*3 


Shute3bury 


~ 


969.66 


31*1.00 


1,310.66 


Silver Lake Regional 


31,295.98 


— 


mm 


31,295.98 


Somerset 


1,773.38 


921* .95 


28.10 


2,726.1*3 


Somerville 


111,398.39 


a, 153. 39 


™ 


115,551.78 


Southampton 


— 


5,235.56 


1,708.95 


6,91*1*. 51 


Southboro 


•M 


2,779.93 


579.1*1 


3,559.31* 


Southbridge 


58,951.73 


1,156.25 


1*97.20 


60,608.18 


Southern Berkshire Regional «— 


mm 


mum 


■»«•«» 


South Hadley 


162.59 


10,076.1*1* 


1,008.99 


11,51*8.02 


South Shore Regional 


82,861.37 


mm 


MM 


82,861.^7 


Southwick 


mm 


7,375.11 


2,636.1*1* 


10,011.55 


Spencer 


l|03.75 


7,337.78 


1,237.25 


8,978.78 


Springfield 


396,868.13 


mm 


— 


396,868.13 


Sterling 


— 


1,776.83 


1,1*0U.18 


3,181.06 


Stockbridge 


l*,2h6.66 


75.50 


51.00 


!*,373.16 


Stone ham 


mm 


5,H11.19 


737.1*8 


6,11*8.67 


Stoughton 


1,21,8.17 


7,1*13.98 


1,592.98 


10,255.13 


Stow 


mm 


23.55 


-— 


23.55 


Sturbridge 


mm 


1,189.05 


582.00 


1,771.05 


Sudbury 


mm 


925.63 


306.75 


1,232.38 


Sunderland 


mm 


1,607.85 


2,12l*.22 


3.732.07 


Sutton 


— 


2,628.18 


6Ll.fl 


3,269.99 


Swampscott 


772.00 


81,2.32 


171.75 


1,786.07 


Swansea 


7,1*51.21* 


673.15 


88.33 


8,212.72 



380 



City, Town 
County or Region 



Haintenance 



Tuition 



Transportation Total 



Taunton 

Templeton 

Tewksbury 

Tisbury 

Tolland 

Topsfield 

Towns end 

Truro 

Tyngsboro 

Tyringham 

Upton 

Uxbridge 

Wachusett Regional 

Wakefield 

Wales 

Walpole 

Waltham 

Wars 

WSarsham 

Warren 

Warwick 

Washington 

Watertown 

Wayland 

Webster 

Wellesley 

Wellfleet 

Wendell 

Wenham 

Westboro 

West Boylston 

West Bridgewater 

West Brookf ield 

Westfield 

Westford 

Westharopton 

Westminster 

West Newbury 

Weston 

Westport 

West Springfield 

West Stockbridge 

West Tisbury 

Westwood 

Weymouth 

Whately 

Whitman 

Whitman-Hanson Regional 

Wilbraham 

Williamsburg 

Williamstown 

Wilmington 



37,033.21* 
14,078.92 



235.00 



9,7t*l*.52 
2,123.31 



10t*,76l.73 
12,591.03 



21* ,125.73 
2,15U.70 



5,lll*.17 
123,91*5.22 



6,378.99 
1,192.20 



2,391.50 
106,063.75 



1,752.50 



1*67.1*5 
1,629.26 
1*,1*80.90 



221.10 
705.90 

1,029.1*5 

2,1*61*.53 

3U.00 

2,761,91 
2,913.03 

1*,1*37.68 

838.95 
1*,286.39 
1,615.79 
6,8ll*.l*5 

585.91 
1*,379.13 

685.00 

8,178.19 

3,691.57 

U,669.23 

1,368.80 

39.60 

3,12lwU5 

810.72 

1*62.11* 

2,180.10 

2,197.61 

U,365.11 
5,983.26 
1,1*1*5.85 
1,761.30 
2,520.78 
25.13 

973.1*5 
2,1*89.11 
9,38U.9h 

913.80 

327.50 
U,519.27 
3,396.1*3 
2,335.06 



1,775.05 



6,21*8.77 

1*,029.55 

11*5.1*0 

2,861u56 



62.25 

1*1*1* .00 

1,203.98 



6i*.50 

11*2.20 

72.80 

122.25 

867.00 

762.33 

990.87 

25U.50 
1,118.0b 

185.63 
2,1*51.21 

138.00 
1,1*01.85 

51*8.30 

629.13 

708.59 

1,1*1*8.60 

156.18 

960.00 

78.00 

72.90 

537.95 

81*7.95 

l,77l*.70 

696.98 

325.78 

851.50 

950.73 

283 .1*3 
776.88 

715.95 
86.00 

1*1.76 

509.33 

1,112.31 

819.97 

36U.98 
1*1*1.11 

529.13 



37,562.91* 
2,073.26 
9,763.80 



288.60 
81*8.10 
1,261*.1*5 
2,537.33 
156.25 
3,628.91 
3,675.36 

9,7l*l*.52 
7,551.86 

1,093.1*5 
5,i*0U.l*3 

106,563.15 
9,265.66 

13,3H*.9l* 
5,780.98 
1,233.30 

8,807.32 

1* ,1*00.16 

30,21*3.56 

3,679.68 

39.60 

U, 101* .1*5 

888.72 

535.01* 

2,718.05 

8,159.73 

6,139.81 

130,625.1*6 

1,771.63 

2,612.80 

3,1*71.51 

25.13 

1,256.88 

9,6!*1*.98 

11,323.09 

999.80 

2,760.76 
111,092.35 
l*,508.7l* 
3,155.03 
1,752.50 

6,613.75 

1*,1*70.*6 

H*5J*0 

5,168.71* 



381 



City, Town, 
County or Region 



Winchendon 

Winchester 

Windsor 

Winthrop 

Woburn 

Worcester 

Wbrthington 

Wrenthara 

larmouth 

TOTALS 



Maintenance 



5,7*3.71 



3,1401.55 
1*58,079.52 



1,1*15.61 
6,263,897.59 



Tuition 



1,605.29 

1,31*8.09 

1,661.65 
6,396.36 

22U.75 
715.53 
381.73 
708.56 



Transportation 



1,1*86.25 

121.08 

72.30 

256.83 

1*89.13 

1,21*6.50 

218.1*2 

1,011* .50 



Total 



>•*. 



*5 



8,81*5 

1,969.17 

72.30 

2,118.1*8 

10,237.01* 

l*58,30l*.27 

1,992.03 

1,100.15 

3,138.67 



825,998.76 207,650j*6 7,297.51*6.81 






s 








• r 



*Ti 






| 

I 



I 

■ 






MAfMUht UtMUK 









«► 



~A»* 



■J . -■;?■ 



» 






«**.■> u*y 



2 



* 



■ 



i^iHtfl Mj 



3 



UUf 



-2 

■ 



• 



- » 



- 



■ 
1 



ft*" 



i 



H I I II — —W H 



-.-*■ 



■ 



Bj 

• 

-9 



OK 
M 









I 






\ 



383 I 



Table Ho* 6 • 



Vital » 



tatistioe by Typ«» of Schools and Department* for School 
Tear Ending Juno 30, 196u. 



1963 • X96lt 




£ 



6 



2 



CROUP I la - BOTSt DAT INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS 



Appenequet Regional 

Arlington 

Attleboro 

Area 

Bamo table 

Belmont 

Beverly 
Boa ton 



Chicopoe 

Dartmouth 

Digbton-Rabcboth Reg. 

Everett 

Fall River a Btrnan 

Fitcbburg 



Gloucester 

Greenfield 

Haverhill 

Holyoke 

King Philip Regional 

Leominster 

Lowell 

Lynn Shoe 

I^mn Trade 

Maiden 

Karlboro 

Bedford - 

Hantucket 

Sew Bedford 



62 

137 

160 

26 

106 

77 

160 

137 

277 

1*3 

69 

no 

338 
10it 
106 
135 
205 
526 
259 

70 
201 
356 
111 
287 
132 
103 
2hh 

27 
509 



23 
27 
16 
1 
27 
21 
16 
1L0 

1*9 
12 



72 
6 

— 
25 

5 

117 



78 
11 

18 

53 
1*1 
10 
1U 

1*9 
150 



58.9 
128.2 

153*3 
21.2 

93.0 

56.3 

12*8.6 

1*109.0 

116.6 

210.2 

1*1.3 

65.L 

201*6 

323.1 

95.2 

103.0 

128.3 
176.1 
1*92.0 
2U.9 

62.5 
179.0 
31*6.8 

50.6 
272.1 

131.2 
89.6 

223.7 
25.8 

1*73.5 



56.8 
119.6 
Ul.7 
22.5 
86.0 
50.8 

lUi.7 
960,0 
109.6 

191.3 

39.1 

63.7 

187 Ji 

312.2 

89.9 

98.8 

119.6 

160.2 

1*67.5 
191.1 

59.6 
167.3 
335.7 

ltl.6 
252.1 
111.6 

82.1 
211.1* 

2i*.7 
152.8 



11* 

16 

20 

6 

15 
16 

29 

185 

23 

31 

u* 
ii* 

62 

67 

22 

29 

2* 

28 

61 

27 

U 
ft 

69 
7«i 
ft 
27 
22 

51 
7 



l 

3 
2 






k 

12 

17 
9 

18 

137 
21 

18 

1 

$ 
12 

52 

- 11 
7 ~ 



M 

1 

23 
2 

39 



6 

5 
8 
1 
3 



1 

3 
2 



6 

1*0 
1*2 

1 

21* 
23 
17 
11* 
22 
11* 
22 



(SOUP I U - B€X5< OUT ZHDOSTIUAL SCHOOLS (continued) 



:-Jev Salem 



Korth Ados* • ^eCana 

Northampton 

Korthbridge 

Pesbocfcr 

PUtsfield 

Province town 

Quincy 



Silver Lake Hegionel 

Sowerrille 

Southbridge - Cole 

South Shore 

Springfield 

Swansea 

Taunton 

Malthas 

Warehtn 

Webster - imrtlett 

Westfield 

**eyaouth 

Voroester 



Total for type 
of school 



35 
306 

276 
2% 

16 

91 
299 

32 
277 

32 

ui> 

72 
297 
155 
169 
926 

20 

97 
269 

27 

IS 

226 
291 

711 



i. 



35 
95 
26 

17h 

1 

3 

29 

h 

hi 

8 
16 

299 

* 

26 

39 

31 

lift 
112 



32,8 

871.5 
251.8 
256.0 

Hi .2 

85.0 
2?8.7 

31.9 
251.0 

22,9 
lOluO 

63.9 
269.1: 
H*5.7 

162a 

807.2 
17.« 
*>.2 

2».3 

26.0 

80.5 
«5.8 
U .1 
651.5 



31.3 

2I46.9 

236.9 

211.0 

13.2 

79.7 

256.6 

29.2 

235.1 

19.6 

99.1* 

59.9 

210.8 

138.2 

15fc .5 

738.ii 

17.1 

att.i 
216.9 

2k .2 

75.5 
215.0 
251.3 
6U.1 



h 
53 

22 



11 
3 



— 2 

8 — 

78 — 

6 — 

66 k 

6 ~ 

30 e* 

13 h 

US 5 

9 e* 

100 — 

3 1 

16 3 

U U 

5 3 

22 — 

22 2 

6fl t 

131 2 



384 



JL 



3 
16 
32 

15 
2 

20 

17 

29 
12 
11 

5 

19 
23 

15 
197 

I 

32 
« 

7 
21 

53 

50 



llt578 2,325 10 f li&.i» 9,676.0 2,002 196 1,361 



0800? III 1 - 



• TTi^ C - 






I PRXPASUTOftX (pots) 



Fitchburg 

Leonine ter 

Lynn 

Korth Adaoe • HoCamt 

Waltham 

Westfield 

Total for type 
of school 



16 
23 

37 

n 

85 
57 



36« 



15 
20 



16 



93 



tef 

17.2* 
32.9 
57.1 
51.2 
57.1 
U7.9 



7.5 
U.O 
27.0 
19.9 
U5.8 

U3.U 
ii6.u 



— — 10 



31 
1*5 



272.5 



231.0 — 



7y 



f 

20 
2 



70 



ORTOP I lb - » OaT IHDUSTRIAL schools 



«■• 



Boston 
£eeex County 
Fall Kiver - Binan 

Springfield 
Worcester - Fanning 

Total for type 
of school 



265 
1*0 

55 
1U 
209 
251 



23 

2 

83 

13 
118 



223.0 
3 7 .0 
31.0 

103.0 

190a 
231.1 



193.0 
3i:.0 
29.9 
96.1 

171.6 

212a 



hi 
36 
22 

65 

61 

n 



21 
3 
6 



937 



269 



821.2 



737.0 3tt 30 



19 
U 

3 
10 

25 
11 



138 



(sump i v» • mrt mm * mm c - tkkm m&mkWBx (girls) 

I | 3 !j_ 

J|_U . J IIIILI il l - '• ~ * r- - - *" ' 






6 



385 



Boston 
Fall River 
Springfield 

Total for typo 
of ocbool 



h 
31 



U.O 
31.0 
21.0 



i*.0 
26.2 
17.0 



— ~ 11 



63 



16*6 



U7.2 



— 11 



«cop x lc - aKsraiAL bspaethekts 



WWW— > IB ll I' 1 ' ■!■— »— ^■'■T' i ' 
■MfNMMW" «*W »Wf|i« H — i n 



»«wMM««H«N 



Boston - 



Brighton 
Charleston* 
Dorchester 
Eaat Bootcn 
Hyde Pork 



South Boston 



2G3 
222 

137 
61 

?? 

? 

63 



1 
3 



259.0 
209.0 
123.0 
59.0 
70.0 
83.0 
52.0 



2h2.G 
2 6.0 
115.0 
52.0 
71* .0 
80.0 
U7.0 



1 



— 1 



Total for typo 

Of School 



950 



868,0 



616.0 



20 



•■ ■ ■ » ■■ 

•MMMMM 



3 

11* 

8 
10 



106 



———I I I'll ' M K— W— 



0H0UP I 2a - PARM1HR COOPWUTm TR4DF SCK00U 



Arlington 3 

Beverly 31 

Beaton • Brighton %k& 

Charles town 118 

Dorchester Hit 

Eaat Beaten 9$ 

ffrde Park 103 

Roakury 138 

Sooth Boetam 56 

Fitchbarg 10 

HavarliUl 63 

Holyoko 22 

Pittefield 3fe 

Southbrldge 36 

Springfield 108 

*e*tfield h2 

Total for typo 

of aehool 1,137 



1 
13 

1 

5 
2 
2 

3 



31 

8 

5 
3 

6 

26 



1.6 
30,5 

IfeS.Q 

105.0 

10C.0 

92.0 

76.5 
116*0 

.0 

-•? 
55.5 

21*6 

l£.3 



I M 

al.8 
12.0 



1.5 

30*0 

131.0 

101.0 

100.0 

89.0 

75.2 

11C.0 

h$.0 

9.7 

53.3 

fcO.7 

15.3 

27.li 

28.8 

12.9 
ItO.O 



3 

12 

62 
17 
2S 

3U 
38 
9 

21 

10 
60 
10 
16 
3* 
17 
3$ 
U2 



2 
2 



2 
2 

10 

lc ? 

« 
12 

2 



— 1 



U3 



960.2 



920,8 555 



&1 



1 ri&fi 

mem xu • m»«s wmxm xxmmxxi scbqom 

1 * ? 1* 5 6 7 

Apponequet Regional 3li 10 3**.0 33.1 — — — 

Itrnstable 75 37 59*0 1*7.7 — — 32 

Beverly 81 35 57.6 16.1* — — 31 

801 121 598.0 It26.0 _ — 21^3 



Brockton 11*2 ft 116.0 102,5 — — 38 

Chicopee 319 29 191.7 U*2.8 — — l6u 

Dighton*8ehoboth Regional 17 10 16.9 l6.lt — — — 

Pall River 107 22 78.2 09*6 — — ^6 



63 U2 37.5 31.3 — — 18 

Oraenfield 205 ItO 18U.S 156.7 — 22 

Haverhill 333 2lt2 22«.9 175.3 — — 122 

Selyetee 96 29 .6 1*3.9 — — 50 

Slug Philip Kegional 29 17 2lt.7 22.1 — — 7 

Lawrence 128 % 93«li 73*7 «• m 66 

Leeeiinetar 59 37 39a 29.5 — — 29 

Lowell Hit — 88.0 62.0 



Lynn Shoe 115 76 59.2 1*5.8 — — ~ 

lyon Trade 301 ?28 210.6 176.1* — — 57 

Walden lt3 12 lt0.1 26.7 — — 19 

Marlboro 100 28 75«b 59.6 — — 36 



Bedford 129 56 55Ji 3U.3 ~ — 10t 

How Bedford 517 235 350.0 302.0 ~ — 221 

Kewton 161 53 90.7 69.8 — — 63 

Borth Adams * HcCaw 112 — 67.2 50.7 — — 6* 

ftorthanpton 61 20 61.0 52.0 — — 7 

Pittafield 177 25 11*8.1 116,2 — — 37 

ProYincetowa 1*2 — 31.9 32.6 — — 7 

Quiaejr 217 UiO 172.0 l&.l 



Sale* 1*7 27 35.8 26.9 — — It 

SemenriUe 153 25 92.0 75.7 — — 1*7 

Southbridgs 76 31 Mi .9 314.9 — — 37 

South Shore 118 h} 77.7 65.2 mm mm 51* 

Springfield 761 311* 1*99#0 1*05.0 — — 388 

Swansea & — &.0 1*7.3 — — — 

Taunton 71 17 39.2 30.2 «+ 35 — 

Weltha* 55 11 31.8 25a — — 21* 



Kestfield 37 6 33^* 31.7 — — 7 

weyaeuth 100 36 78.0 63.0 mm mm 39 

Worcester 1,110 380 850.0 668.0 ~. — 331 

Total for typ* 

of school 7,160 2,1*81* 5,099.8 1,071.1* — 35 2,536 

-■--" - -" ■ *— • — ' - arn ' -1 r— r ■ - -i n rr ■tti 1 1 m irrrr i r r 1 run " mi n - mm n m i ii i i nn . mi ii.ii.h rri i i i i m ■■ i m i n.iw i m 

Wj i ii M i n iiww^iiiwi. )iw wn amm+mmm »—« i nnnm mm < m i> m \ »»mmmmmm * ■ m — mmm ti*m\m «. — . niiw i w « w iP nm« i > i wmm m mw* \ \t t m tm% mnm mr « hwihh. ii •-*•****, mmmmmmwut u \ m . i \ \ tmmmmmmmmmwm 

mm 1 ti 2 * vmxm rum tvmsios schools (mm) 

1— »—— urn ■ im .<—■»— »«———»»— m i 11 . n 1 1 1 mi . mmmm — mmmmmmmm n i n ■ n ■ i , . , i i i i 

Springfield 10 10 20.0 20.0 mm «m» — 

fetal for type ' 

of school 20 10 £0.0 20.0 — — 



urn i"i 'i"i 1 " in 11 ' 'i 1 t 1 t;t U '.v. 



GROUP I 2d - ETCHING APPfUMICESHXP SCHOOLS 



oci y 



2. 



k. 



Boston 

Boston Journeyman 

Brockton 

Fitchburg 

Haverhill 

Eolyoke 

Sing Philip Regional 

Lawrence 

Leominster 

Lowell 

Lynn 

Marlboro 

Modford 

Newton 

Pittefield 

Quincy 

Springfield 

Taunton 

Weymouth 

Worcester 

Total for typo 
of school 



1,616 

h03 

96 

IS 
hi 
hk 
18 
39 
23 
52 

153 
15 
32 

128 
52 

110 

59 

183 
26 

17 
112 



1,051 
252 

50 
33 
31 
12 

13 
6 

18 

76 
5 

19 
9h 
& 

15 
37 

101 

18 

9 

Ui 



i,ua.u 

316.1 
57.1 
20.8 
27.9 
32.9 
15.8 

27.3 
17.3 
11.0 

115.5 
15.0 

25-7 
68.5 
U2.5 
91.2 

50.5 

Da.o 

U.o 

13.lt 

77.0 



1,206.0 
26U.7 
L0J» 
18.2 
19.6 
28.8 
13.0 
21. 3 
U.2 
31* .0 
92.9 
11.3 
18.0 
15.2 
30.9 
83.2 
13.8 
113.0 
9.2 
9.2 
57.0 



5 
10 



309 

UtO 

hi 

25 

15 
11 

8 
15 

9 
11 
25 

5 
16 
90 

9 
U» 
18 
58 

1 

lil 



3,261* 1,928 2,651.9 2,176.9 



15 875 



III la - DAT HOUSEHOLD ARTS SCHOOLS 



Cambridge 
Everett 
Fall River 
Lowell 
Hew Bedford 
Mew Sales 
Horthampton 
Springfield 
Worcester 

Total for type 
of school 



35 


— 


27.5 


22.3 


13 


2 


6 


13 


mm 


11.5 


10.0 


h 


— 


2 


32 


1 


29.7 


26.0 


6 


3 


3 


133 


13 


116 J* 


106.6 


SI 


11 


19 


292 


87 


261.8 


2L3.U 


39 


12 


35 


20 


19 


18.7 


17.6 


6 


mm 


1 


72 


39 


60.0 


55.0 


U 


mm 


16 


73 


h 


66.2 


58.9 


— 


mm 


la 


86 


IB 


8U.5 


76.8 


12 


— 


9 



758 



181 



676.3 



616.6 1L2 



28 



105 



GROUP III lb - Dal BCtttRHCLD ARTS DKPAHT1OTTS 



Adams 


9 


Apponequet Regional 


M 


Barnstable 


32 


Belchertown 


12 


Beverly 


12 


Bourne 


22 



9.0 


8.L 


7 


1 


mm 


35.5 


33.8 


— 


— 


1 


29.9 


27.3 


13 


mm 


h 


12.0 


10.8 


6 


mm 


— 


10.5 


10.1 


— 


— 


2 


19.1 


17.7 


— 


mm 


2 



OftOUP XII lb - DAI KftMMMi ARTS BKPARTMSiTS (continuad) 



388 



Charlton 

Dartmouth 

Dtixbury 

Fall aivwr 

Falmouth 

Foxboro 

Hadlsy 

Havarhill 

Hudson 

ling Philip Rsgional 



Marahfiald 

aarragansett Regional 

Rawburyport 

North Adams 

Northbridgs 

Hort Brookflsld 

Palmar 

Pittafisld 

Pro vines town 

Salsm 

Saugus 

Soituats 

Silver Lake Regional 

Somsrrills 

Tsvlcsbury 

Wachusstt Bmglonal 

Wareham 

Wast Bridgswatsr 

¥sttport 

Winchnndon 

Total for typs 

of school 



15 

28 

21* 

21 
33 
32 

37 

1*1 
71* 
22 
22 

1)4 

1*0 
28 
liil 
25 
22 
8 
li2 

N 

12 

61 
36 

10 
36 

63 
30 
12 
20 
21 
35 
31 



1*9 
7 



U.9 
26.0 
21,6 
20.2 
30.0 
28.0 
31.0 
39.8 

Hi .3 

17.8 
U.O 
35.1* 
23.2 
126.3 
21.2 
17.1* 
7.3 
36.0 
81.8 
10.1 
60.3 
32.9 
30.1* 
30.9 
1*5.8 
21* .0 
12.0 
19.0 
21.0 
32.9 
28.5 



11.1 
21* .6 
18.5 
11. 
30.0 
28.0 

32.9 
37.6 
62.9 
12.1* 

16.3 

12.0 

33.5 

21.7 

115.5 

19.9 

16.2 

7.2 
3**.0 
67.7 

8.8 
55.0 

29a 

31.1* 
28.7 
1*3.8 
23.6 
11.2 
18.0 
17.0 
30.1 
26.5 



1 — 
3 — 



3 — 



U — 

1 — 
11 — 

7 — 
13 — 

15 m 

k 6 

3 — 

2 *» 

1 1 
U 2 

5 - 

— 6 

8 ~ 
it - 

2 ~ 

9 — 

2 — 



5 



1 

2 



3 
1 

h 

10 
7 
I 
3 
6 
6 
% 



I 

'o 



16 

1 
1 
9 

3 
3 
2 

9 



16 

i* 

1 

11 
2 



1,286 



63 l t lii0.8 



l,0l,?.3 



11*7 19 



198 



OB0G? HI 3 • BfI»I»0 PRACTICAL ART ^LS 



Abington 116 

IgtHMI 377 

Aahsrst-Pelham Bsgional 162 

Andovsr 168 

Apponsqust Regional 116 

Arlington 781 

Athol 112 

Auburn 233 

Barns tabls 168 

Bedford 315 

Belchertotm 19 

Belmont 202 

Beverly 391 

Billeriea 205 



3 

9 
19 
11 

19 



7 
17 



1,6 



90.ii 
317.6 
113.3 
151.5 
109.5 
710.6 
UC.O 

215.3 

uia* 

315.0 
15.0 
199.0 
296.7 
161.9 



71.9 
260.7 
110.6 
12U.2 

91.0 

576.3 
10U0 

193.1* 
ltf*.8 
272.0 
15.0 
163.7 
269.9 

155.1* 



3S< 



ORO'JP III 3 - CVSNIKO PRACTICAL ART ECKOOt (oontlnuwJ) 

1 2 3, 



I 6 



Boston 


1,5^1 


— 


1,316.0 


1,(2*5.0 


Bourne 


93 


h 


89.3 


80.0 


Braintree 


18$ 


mm 


l6h.0 


156.0 


Bridgewater 


81 


i 


68.0 


57.9 


Brockton 


367 


31 


269.3 


228.1* 


Brooklins 


1,139 


72 


739.6 


618.9 


Burlington 


201 


— 


199.0 


iei.9 


Cambridge 


3U 


1 


I81i.0 


119.0 


Canton 


322 


32 


267.0 


222,0 


^^9 4Vk WJ*lH^Wi 


61i 


~» 


6*U 


hkJk 


Chelssford 


271 


7 


271.0 


181.0 


Chicopee 


1.02i» 


16 


829.9 


667.7 


Concord-Carlisle Regional ii8U 


«8 


219.2 


211* .9 


Danvers 


391 


35 


326.0 


309.0 


Dartmouth 


11*0 


mm 


.0 


130.0 


Dighton 


li6 


— 


M.9 


35.S 


Douglas 


30 


13 


2ii.7 


26.0 


Dover 


27 


** 


26.0 


25.5 


Duxburr 


58 


2 


5o.o 


31.1 


Kaathaapton 


253 


6 


213.9 


211. 3 


♦#^W(i» *^ *«W^SSB&^^WP ^WwS*^^^^P 


117 


6 


90.5 


75.0 


Ems ton 


N 


«M 


65.9 


62.0 


Inn 


A 


10 


12.7 


38.0 


Essex bounty 


1,61*2 


— . 


1,376.0 


1,123.0 


Kverett 


200 


*» 


166.1 


126.3 


Fall Elver 


258 


20 


222.7 


178.5 


Falmouth 


65 


— 


&.3 


52.7 


Foxboro 


191 


Ml 


186.0 


161) .0 


Franklin 


201 


12 


15U.3 


131.6 


Frontier Regional 


UO 


M 


83.5 


83.0 


Gardner 


368 


26 


v . 


92.0 


louoester 


187 


— 


115.5 


131.2 


Greenfield 


281 


19 


22k .0 


171.0 


Hadley 


10 


— 


35.5 


29.2 


Hanover 


168 


10 


118.9 


98.k 


Harwich 


120 


21- 


101.0 


79.9 


Haverhill 


100 


21 


95.1» 


6li.w 


Hinghan 


190 


— 


175.1 


17li.6 


f'olbrook 


117 


«■> 


103.9 


ab.2 


Rolyoke 


6ei 


98 


592.0 


506.0 


Hudson 


ni 


mm 


87.2 


86.3 


Hull 


129 


— 


129.0 


68.1 


King Philip Eegional 


122 


35 


U2.5 


103.2 


Lawrence 


61*0 


107 


5l7.li 


5li».5 


Lenox 


bo 


— 


ito.o 


29.0 


Leoainster 


331 


61 


276.6 


21*0.3 


Lexington 


36U 


12 


331.8 


281.9 


Lowell 


562 


26 


382.9 


336.1 


Lunenburg 


115 


« 


99.0 


76.L 


Lynn 


6k$ 


1*7 


527,0 


136.0 


Hahar, Kalph C. f Reg. 


61 


10 


72.8 


68.9 


Manchester 


66 


mm 


56.6 


51.5 


Bedford 


632 


8 


5b2.0 


U67.0 



390 



0RO9P III 3 • %W*XM PRACTICAL ART SOfTOOtS (continued) 

I 2 2 



b 



Kelroae 

Methuen 

Mlddlebor© 

Kltford 

Mlllia 

Milton 

Montague 

Narraganaett Regional 

New Bedford 

North Aetata 
Northampton 
North Attleboro 
Korthbrldge 
Horth Rea din g 
Harwell 



Old Hocheeter Region* 
Palmar 

Pioneer Valley Regional 
Pittsfleld 
Plymouth 
rovincetown 
Qulncy 
Randolph 
Raadlng 
Rehoboth 
Revere 
Rockland 

Ulm 

Saugua 

Scituate 

Shelburne 

Silvar Lake Regional 

Sejeeraet 

Sonenrllle 

Southbridge 

South liadlay 

Spencer 

Springflald 

Stoughton 

Svaapeeott 

Sveneea 

Taunton 

Tewkabury 

Truro 

Wakefield 

Walthaa 

Ware 

Parana* 

Wabatar 

Wellealey 

Veet Drldgevater 

Weetfield 



253 

186 

71 

236 

m 

2bb 
1104 

75 

1,30b 

699 

95 

103 

16b 

64 
19b 

66 
339 

77 
114 

98 
506 
202 

b2 
91*5 
272 
171 

51 

138 

269 

bl8 

371 

63 

55 

110 

140 

5ob 

11*2 
67 
2,165 
176 
148 
151 

y*i 

23b 

25 

381 

390 

bo 

92 
86 

605 
101 

576 



1 
253 

Hi 

14 

28 

9 

16 
6 
6 
2 

2b 
65 



43 



18 

13 

bl6 

1 
37 
15 
52 



58 
1 



23 
127 



76 



222,0 
157.2 

71.0 
20b.8 

5b.9 
195.0 

69.0 

56,3 

1,020.7 

59bJt 

82,0 
103.0 

141.3 
b8,7 

167.2 
58.5 

290.0 

73.9 
87.0 

78*5 
1*62.2 
188.0 

36.3 
81*7.1 
223.0 
157.7 

1*5.8 
125.8 
213.2 
37b .5 
338.9 

59.6 

b6.b 
110.0 
126,7 
bTO.O 

120.9 

116.9 

59.9 

1,855.0 

71.6 

130.8 

135.3 

373.5 

217.0 

19.0 

368.6 

373.2 

38.0 

65.7 

72.5 

571.6 

90.8 

519.0 



160.0 

13b.2 

b3.9 

186.8 

b6.5 

191.6 

58.0 

53.2 

8bb.3 

1*58.1 

82.0 

90.0 

10b .9 

b3.b 

135.1 

bb.7 

27b J* 

57 J* 

70.6 

58.7 

b03.6 

163.0 

29.3 

707.2 

21b .2 

13b.5 
36.8 

111.7 

181.3 

295.7 

252.8 

56.3 

36.9 

96.0 

118.8 

b09.b 

98.6 

91.9 

b8.7 

1,515.0 

60.7 

9b.7 

120.6 

319.7 

198.0 

16.0 

321 .b 

338.2 

33.0 

59.8 

63.2 

b5l.8 

81.9 

509.2 



391 



ORDU? XXI 3 - KYINIiiO PRACTICAL AST SCHOOLS (continued) 



Westport i*9 

West Springfield 191 

*isotwood 277 

weyaouth 633 
«/bitaan-Hanaon Regional 306 

tfinchendon 117 

tfoburn 391* 

Worcester 1,099 

Tanaoutn lU* 



Total for typs 
of school 



36 
19 

U 



38.0 
177.0 
227.9 
593.0 
260.3 
156.0 
102.5 
367.0 
553.8 
113.0 



31.1* 
171.0 
180.0 
$72.0 
203.1 
155.9 

83.9 
311.0 
926.5 
lOtuO 



38.017 2.758 31,550.6 26,896.2 — — — 



GBO0F IV la - DAI AGRICULTURAL SCHOOLS 



Bristol County 
Sseex County 

Horfclk County 

Total for type 
of aohool 



20b 

120 

31* 

281 

26 



m 



192.2 


178.8 


25 


309.5 


280.0 


1*6 


31.1 


30.5 


7 


196.6 


181.1* 


36 


23.0 


22 .0 


2 



u* 

ft 



751.* 



692.7 116 — 



GROUP IV lb * DAI AORXCULTUIUL D&PABTKmS 



Barnstable It 

Boston 97 

Charlton 22* 

Hadley 26 

Karraganottt Regional 39 

forth Hrookfield 25 
Pioneer W..ley Regional 29 

Shelburne 13 

Silver Lake Regional 33 

Stockbridge 20 

Vachuastt Hegional 33 

Weatport II 

Worcester 1*0 



15.5 


13.9 


2 


92.0 


90.0 


22 


22.1 


22.0 


1 


28.0 


25.1* 


U 


38*0 


36.6 


3 


23.6 


15.8 


1 


27.7 


26.L 


a 


13.0 


12.5 


3 


31.0 


29.0 


9 


19.0 


18.9 


2 


28.7 


26 »6 


5 


18.0 


17.1 


2 


35.0 


33.8 


9 



1 

7 
T 

1 



Total for type 
of school 



1*17 



391.6 



368.0 67 ~ 



27 



"ili« 



GROUP 17 3 - EVnWt AORICULTUUL BKFAXntEXtS 
J 1 i 



A 



i 



I« 


Com- 


Far« 


rolled 


pleted 
course 


owner* 


# 


mm 


10 


10L 


mm 


2 


11 


mm 


1 


16 


mm 


5 


20 


— 


15 



Pare f«r« Fare ^ion- 
Tenants Part* 1 abor- Kareers 
ners era 



Bristol County 
Essex County 
llsrrsgsnsstt Regional 
Wachusett Regional 
Wastport 

Total for type 
of school 



203 



36 



1 



2 
1 
2 

7 



12 



39 
101 

3 



11*8 



GRODT V la - F 



A.' 



OTRATIV1. 



TE 0CCUPATI0KS SCHOOLS 



With- 
No. of drawele Other 
Grade* in led* With* 

trained drawals 

_£g£ 



En- 
roll* 



No, of Average 

VonWteal* Kember- 
ship 



Average 

Atten- 






Beverly 

Boston 

Braintree 

Brockton 

Chloopee 

Essex County 

Kitchburg 

Lowell 

Kalden 

f£m%^M Gmmmmmlk 

Peabody 

Pittsflsld 

Quinsy 

Sale* 

Saugue 

Sonerville 

Springfield 

Walthae 

^eynouth 

Total for type 
of school 



20 
106 
18 
20 
16 
18 
29 
21 
16 

Ul 
62 
18 
16 
23 
lit 
20 

19 
20 

23 



u 

7 



19.8 
103.3 

ie.o 

19.2 

15.8 
17.6 
26.7 
19.7 
16.0 
Ii0.2 
61.0 
17.6 
16.0 
22.0 

13.9 
20.0 
17.0 
17.0 
22.0 



18.8 
98.6 
17.7 
17.6 
lii.5 
17.0 
27.0 
16.7 

9.3 
38.2 

55.9 
16.1 
15.1 
22.0 
12.9 
18.7 

15.1 
15.0 
21.0 



20 
79 
U 
11 

18 
28 

a 

16 
u0 



16 
16 

20 

lb 
l: 
2 

19 
22 



3 
1 



5 
2 



2 

1 

\ 



t 

1 
1 



522 



12 



5€t*.8 



1*67.5 392 



21 



<ac up v 3 • &wmn*a vwmsmvtm oemmnom schools 



Boston 
Lowell 
Halden 
Fittsfield 

Total for type 
of school 



l,t*15 

35 

65 

110 



1,625 



211* 



1,292.0 

35.0 

65.0 

110.0 



1,173.0 

35.0 

65.0 

110.0 



315 



— 66 



217 1,502.0 1,383.0 315 — 



66 



group vi 1 • or practical kursl. ogls 



n 



6 



393 



-1 



Boston 
s«ex County 

Fall River 

Lavr«mce 

Lowell 

Berth Adaas - KoCann 

Rorthajoptoa 

Ftoreood 

Pitta field 

Springfield 

Taunton 

Worceeter 

Total for type 
of sehool 



80 
71 
58 

51 

38 
28 
26 

l»7 

U6 

ISO 

67 
120 



36 

n 

29 

3 

15 
39 
21 

79 
38 
91 



56.0 
69,0 
51.6 
J«2.5 
31.9 
20*8 
23.0 
21.2 
31.1 
110,0 

1*2.3 
92.3 



51.0 
68.8 
19.7 

ia.8 

29.7 
19,8 

22,0 
20.5 

29.5 

105.7 

1*1.0 

6JU.0 



35 
30 

10 

lh 

20 
18 
10 
131 
27 
72 



1 
1 
2 



18 

6 

9 

11 

U 

I 

10 

1U 

19 

5 

27 



rat 



uu3 



>'y*.o 



566.5 357 



US 



GROUP VI 2 - ttfi&ftiG PRACTICAL KURSINa SO& 



SoMorrllla 
Springfield 

Total for typo 
of school 



35 
116 



151 



M 



L8 



35.0 
88,0 



31 # 2 — — — 

73.0 — — 16 



123.0 



10J4.2 — — 



U6 



DROOP VII 1 - DAT AREA TSCHKCAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 



I w 



■ l»lll.l I 



i urn 



Arlington 


16 


20 


U2.lt 


39.6 


U 


— 


6 


Fall River 


13 


2 


12.9 


12.6 


3 


1 


2 


aiv*^KA)(lVVWr 


36 


U 


31.9 


29.2 


3 


1 


3 


Lynn 


35 


2 


33.8 


31.6 


15 


«*) 


— 


tfarlbor© 


37 


lii 


31* .9 


32.5 


20 


mm 


{ 


Medford 


60 


10 


57.8 


51.8 


18 


2 


How Modford 


25 


6 


23.li 


22.8 


12 


mm 


e* 


Mevten 


7 


3 


7.0 


6.6 


3 


mm 


mm 


nttaflald 


165 


It 


163.2 


156.5 


36 


mm 


3 


South Shore 


19 


3 


16.6 


15.8 


8 


mm 


2 


Springfield 


135 


57 


122.5 


112.5 


59 


mm 


21 


Waynouth 


12 


mm 


38.6 


36.3 


mm 


mm 


5 


Worcester 


121 


u 


109.5 


98.7 


h£ 


2 


13 


Total for type 
















of aohool 


711 


171 


691.7 


6fc9.5 


236 


6 


62 



-31*4 



GROUP VII 2 • EVEKXff- AREA TECHNICAL VOCAflQHAL 8CK0CUI 
1 2 J k 



JL 



O 



Fall River 

Framlnghem 

Leowinster 

lyuu 

Bedford 

Kev Bedford 

Pittefield 

Quincy 

South Short 

Springfield 

WalthS* 

fcest/ield 

Worcester 

Total for tyoo 
of school 



15 


3 


13** 


159 


108 


10?.$ 


37 


13 


Me9 


ft 


38 


V. 


U 


26 


31.6 


1* 


13 


33 Ut 


30 


mm 


2?.l 


1U 


56 


99.7 


36 


12 


2r.6 


s 


28 


59.0 


15 


7 


*.r 


UO 


12 


35.8 


76 


1*7 


63.0 



-17 



372 



13.0 
92.9 

?i.9 

61.9 
2lul 
30.6 
25.7 
61.5 

21.5 

7.3 
33.8 
51.0 



60^.1 



517.2 — _ 



3 
1»8 
Hi 
13 

y 

17 
2 

58 
13 

n 

8 
12 



|f| 



GRAsD TOtALS 



Boy*» Day Industrial U,57o 
Boy** Trade Preparatory 361 
Qirl* 1 Day Industrial 937 

Girls 1 Trad* Preparatory 63 
Industrial Department* ffk 
Part-time Cooperative 

Trade 1,137 

Men 1 * Evening IndU9trial7,l60 
Evening Trade Extension 

(Women) 20 

Evening Apprentieeahip 3,261 
Day Household Art* Schooli 758 
Day Household Art* 

Departments 1,286 

Evening Practical Art 38,017 
Day Agricultural School* 965 
Day Agricultural 

Departaent* 1*17 

Evening Agricultural 

Departments 203 

Part-tiM* Cooperative 
Distributive Occupa- 
tions School* 522 
Evening Distributive 

Occupations schools 1,625 
Day Practical ^rsing 7*2 

Kvening Practical Cursing 151 
Day Area Vocational "Li 

Evening Area Vocational 81? 



2,325 


lo,i*j&«i» 


9,676.0 


2,002 


196 


1,361 


93 


272.5 


2314.0 


— 


79 


70 


269 


1#1 


737.0 


m 


30 


138 


— 


56.0 


17.2 


mm 


— 


11 


6 


86c .0 


816.0 


** 


20 


106 


113 


960.2 


920.8 


555 


8 


63 


2,l*!j 


5,09?. 8 


1,071.1* 


ee 


35 


2,536 



10 

l f 92n 
18* 

63 

2,75B 



12 

217 
h03 

171 
372 



20.0 
2,651.9 

676.3 

1*1*0.8 

31,5<n.6 
751*^ 

391.6 



20.0 

2,176.9 

616.6 

1,01*7.3 
26,8^^.2 

692.7 

368.0 



lii? 

11*7 

116 

67 



5&u8 

1,502.0 
59? .0 
123.0 

605.1 



167.5 392 



1,363.0 

566.5 

10n.2 

6U9.5 
517.2 



3tf 

236 



15 

2 

1? 



105 
19$ 

99 
2? 



21 

11*5 
M 

62 

269 



GiUKD rrfSAXS 



71,757 U^i53 59,719.3 52,013.0 k,673 Ul»5 6,198 



i n im» ii 



3*35 



TAIL* HU. 7 FUKBAL SMITH HUGHES AMD CfeOBOE 1ABIW FUMD3 
tate and Local Matching Dollar for Dollar 

nouim - &x. ^uiivJH^ - a tchimg runs 

school Xear ~nded Juno 30, 1964 



Type - Vocational education 



B- lance - July 1, 1963 
oceipts t 

>ndth Hughes Funds 
George Barden Funds 



Agriculture 



Distributive 
Oeeupatie 



Trad* & 

industrial 



lis .cries 



»r ctical 
Nurse 



rea Voc; tlonal 
Title VIII 



Teacher 
Training 



46,955.00 10,496.75 93.175.25 

39,347.51 67,291.09 101,767.97 193,397.26 



7,000.00 



9,420.35 



73,888.65 



1,852.08 



243,075.92 



28,834.00 
75,048.17 



Totals 



18,272.43 



179*461.00 
799,316.57 



Total .trail able 

Balance en Hand, June 30, 1964 



36,302.51 



67,291.09 112,264.72 287,072.51 7,000.00 



83,309.00 
4,901.54 



249,923.00 103,882.17 



997,050.00 
4,901.54 



Expended 7-1-63 to 6-30-64 



36,302.51 



67,291.09 112,264.72 287,072.51 7,000.00 



78,407.46 



249,928.00 103,832.17 



992,143.46 



Analysis of xrendltureo 

Returned to V ashington 

tate Adminietration 

State Supervision aid 
To eher-Training 

Local Schools 



6,024.37 



80,278.14 



8,741.38 



6,788.33 



33,628.13 



3,J00.00 



58,5^9.71 105,476.39 253,444.38 3,200.00 



16,650.71 



61,756.75 



8,734.37 103,882.17 



241,193.63 



3,800.00 
134,449.46 

803,899.00 



TO;' L~ 



Jt to end Local 
latching Funds 



86,302.51 



67,291.09 112,264.72 287,072.51 7,000.00 



73,407.46 



249,923.00 103,882.17 



792,772.00 134,234.00 1,059,330.00 8,035,322.00 4,774.00 206,066.00 



403,136.00 



992,148.46 



52,242.16 17,822,824.16 



396 



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